The revolution in technical education in England starts here.

These are not just words. A high quality, world-class technical education system, which learners and employers can trust in and be proud of, is the foundation of a successful and productive country.

We know that the new T Level qualifications, which the Institute will be responsible for, must raise standards, and maintain them. The Sainsbury Report envisaged two pathways for learners who didn’t want to take an academic route – apprenticeships and T Levels – and recommended the development of a framework of 15 routes to skilled employment so learners could choose the best path.

The occupational maps provide this framework and they must be clearly defined, easy to navigate and accessible.

We asked you in December 2017 to work with us to ensure the maps are fit for purpose. We needed your views and feedback, drawing upon your expertise in technical education and employment, from the classroom to the boardroom.

We consulted with you to ensure accuracy, to identify skilled occupations not already captured or any occupations that should be moved to different clusters or pathways.

The results of that consultation are included in this document. Thank you for your feedback and your candour.

And what have we found? For starters, and reassuringly, there is certainly general support for the maps and the dual apprenticeship/T Level pathways. There was still some lack of understanding about the purpose of the occupational maps, and in particular what is meant by an occupation. There was also some confusion about the difference between an apprenticeship and a T Level – in particular the difference between on the job training/work experience study. In addition, you have voiced concern about how the maps will remain current and forward-looking.

The analysis of the 386 responses is now complete. The Institute’s route panels, as owners/stewards of their maps, have reviewed them and made decisions about the changes needed. We can now present the revised occupational maps, together with an overview of what the consultation told us.  This includes how the maps will be digitalised and kept up to date and their role in prioritising standards for review and standards for development.

Your feedback and input will ensure that we determine the skills and training expected to be delivered as part of each separate qualification for years to come.

The occupational maps will be the driver of the new technical education system. So thank you again for all your responses. Your feedback and input will ensure these maps work for everyone – for employers to be able to tap into greater and more diverse talent and for learners to get the skills they need to flourish in an ever more competitive workplace.

Sir Gerry Berragan, CEO, Institute for Apprenticeships

1. Executive summary

This section provides a high-level summary of the Government’s response to the public consultation on the occupational maps.

Occupational Maps

Occupational maps document all the skilled occupations that can be achieved through an apprenticeship or Technical Level (T Level) qualification. The occupations are grouped together to show linkages between them and possible routes for progression.  For the purposes of the maps, an occupation is defined as a set of jobs whose main tasks and duties are characterised by a high degree of similarity. 

The occupational maps provide the basis for the Institute’s future development of T Level qualifications, and will also provide a useful guide for individuals considering technical education and employers interested in offering it. They are owned, and will be reviewed regularly, by the respective route panels, made up of industry and assessment experts, to ensure they remain accurate, up to date and forward looking.

A Glossary of the terms used when referring to the occupational maps can be found in Annex C.

Consultation  

From December 2017 to February 2018, the Institute undertook a public consultation to assess the accuracy of the occupational maps.  In particular, this focused on whether all relevant occupations are included and whether they are organised in the most appropriate way. This document provides a route-by-route analysis of the 386 consultation responses received, and the Institute’s commentary on how it has addressed proposed changes. Any relevant changes have been made in the revised occupational maps that accompany this consultation.  A full list of the organisations that responded to the consultation can be found in Annex B.

Overall, the responses revealed general support for the occupational maps, the occupations listed and the way in which they are organised, as well as the dual apprenticeship and T Level pathways. Respondents recognised the value of the occupational maps for individuals, employers and training providers.

Next Steps

An updated version of the maps is published on the Institute’s website alongside this consultation response. These maps are live documents and will be updated regularly to ensure they remain an accurate reflection of the occupational route. route panels will regularly review the maps and they will be updated on a quarterly basis.

The maps will continue to play an important part in the development of T Levels. T Levels will be based on standards within the pathways and will initially be introduced at Level 3. There are, however, certain routes, pathways and clusters that the Post-16 Skills Plan identified as being appropriate solely for apprenticeships.

In the coming months we will make further improvements to the maps to clearly show the opportunities for progression.

2. Background

In July 2016, the Government published the report of the Independent Panel on Technical Education (the Sainsbury Report) and the Post-16 Skills Plan. The Panel made 34 recommendations on how to reform the technical education system, to ensure that individuals can develop the technical knowledge and skills needed by employers and industry. The Government accepted all of the recommendations in the Post 16 Skills Plan and brought forward the Technical and Further Education Act 2017 (‘the 2017 Act’).

One of the Panel’s recommendations was for a framework of 15 routes to skilled employment (see Annex A). This became the basis of the creation of 15 occupational maps, detailing the skilled occupations in each route for which apprenticeships or Technical Education level (T Level) qualifications can be developed. T Levels are new classroom-based technical qualifications that will be available alongside apprenticeships, as part of a high-quality technical education offer. Government has recently published its response to the consultation on T Level Implementation, and this consultation response sits alongside it.

Occupational Maps

Each occupational map details the occupations in a particular route that can be achieved through an apprenticeship or T Level qualification.  An occupation is defined as ‘a set of jobs whose main tasks and duties are characterised by a high degree of similarity’[1].   The occupational maps group occupations at different levels, with related knowledge, skills and behaviours into pathways. Within each pathway, occupations at the same level are grouped into clusters. 

The UK economy is dynamic, so the occupational maps are intended to be live documents and will be updated regularly as occupations evolve and new ones emerge.

To ensure occupational maps remain up-to-date, each map is owned by a route panel, made up of industry experts.  You can find out more about the route panels here. They have responsibility for ensuring the maps remain up to date as new apprenticeship standards are approved and existing ones reviewed.  route panels will also set the strategic direction of the route, identifying additional occupations that need to be developed where appropriate. 

 Consultation

The Institute for Apprenticeships (referred to in this document as ‘the Institute’) took responsibility for the occupational maps in November 2017.  As part of our commitment to the employer-led development of apprenticeship standards and T Level qualifications, we conducted a public consultation (from December 2017 to February 2018) to assess whether all the relevant occupations are included in the maps, and whether these are organised in the most appropriate way. We published the proposed maps online, alongside a survey for respondents to complete. The consultation generated 386 responses from a wide range of organisation types and individuals, spanning professional bodies, employers, further education colleges, training providers and assessment organisations. A series of ten consultation events were also held across the country, covering both T Levels and the Occupational maps, with over 500 people attending. A full list of organisations that responded to the consultation is included in Annex B.

These responses were analysed by the Institute, with oversight from the route panels. This document responds to the key comments received, first by answering some general queries and then by responding to comments on each of the occupational maps in turn. Each of the 15 occupational maps have been updated in line with this, and  to reflect the progress made in developing and approving standards since the maps were last published. The updated maps are published alongside this document.  

[1] Resolution Concerning Updating the International Standard Classification of Occupations  (2007); International Labour Organisation.

3. Summary of the consultation responses received and analysis undertaken

Consultation responses received

The consultation generated 386 responses. A breakdown of the respondents by category is provided below:

Table 1: Total consultation respondents by type

respondent type graph

Table 2: Total consultation respondents by Occupational Route

respondents by route graph

Analysis undertaken

The Institute reviewed and analysed all responses received for each occupational map. Responses were grouped under the two core themes of the consultation – identification of a new occupation and suggestions to move an occupation to an alternative map or to an alternative pathway or cluster within a map.

It was not possible to undertake the same level of analysis on the new occupations identified by respondents without the additional detail which is provided by trailblazers when they submit an occupation proposal to the Institute for approval. An alternative evaluation has, therefore, been used. There will be an opportunity for route panels to review each occupation in detail once an occupation is provided by a trailblazer.

For those responses identifying a potential new occupation, research was undertaken to establish whether it was a valid occupation, in line with the Institute’s quality statement and occupational requirements. The Institute has a set of requirements that must be met, as part of the apprenticeship approval process, for an occupation to be judged appropriate for an apprenticeship standard or T Level. The occupations proposed for inclusion in the maps have been assessed against these requirements, as far as the available evidence has allowed.  The Institute’s requirements for an occupation are listed below on page 9.

Responses suggesting moving an occupation to an alternative map were checked against existing standards, in both suggested maps, to determine if there were similarities and to identify best fit. In instances where it was not clear where the occupation was best suited, the respective route panels were asked to review the knowledge, skills and behaviours to confirm the allocation.

The feedback from the respective route panels was reviewed and confirmed by the Approvals and Funding Committee (a subcommittee of the Institute’s Board). In addition, the maps reflect decisions on occupations made by each route panel and the Approvals and Funding Committee since November 2017.

4. General Questions on the Occupational Maps from the Consultation

A number of common queries were raised in the responses relating to:

  • the purpose of the Occupational maps,
  • the definition of an occupation,
  • the treatment of occupations that span multiple route s and
  • how the maps will be kept up to date.

These are clarified below:

 Purpose of the Occupational Maps

A number of respondents asked for clarification on the purpose of the maps. Occupational maps document all the skilled occupations that can be achieved through an apprenticeship or T Level qualification in each of the 15 occupational routes (see Annex A for details). The maps group occupations with related knowledge, skills and behaviours into pathways, making it easier to see the opportunities for career progression within that particular route. Within each pathway, occupations at the same level are grouped into clusters, to show how skills learnt can be applied to other related occupations. 

The occupational maps will provide a useful guide to show the technical education options available for individuals, as well as employers and training providers who are interested in offering it. In addition, they provide the basis for the development of T Level qualifications, which will cover all of the occupations listed on the maps at Level 3, apart from those identified by the Post-16 Skills Plan  as being appropriate solely for apprenticeships. The T Levels will be initially developed at level 3 and will cover all occupations within the respective pathway.

For further information on the T Level programme, please refer to the Government Response to Implementing the T Level Programme, which has been published alongside this document.

Definition of an Occupation

An occupation is defined as a set of jobs whose main tasks and duties are characterised by a high degree of similarity.  The Institute has a set of requirements, used as part of the approvals process, which must be met for an occupation to be judged appropriate for an apprenticeship standard or T Level. The occupations proposed for inclusion in the maps have been assessed against these requirements, as far as the available evidence has allowed.  The Institute’s requirements for an occupation are for it to be:

  • Transferable to a range of employers
  • Sufficiently broad, deep and skilled to require at least a year of employment and training, with 20% of this being off-the-job
  • Capable of providing full occupational competence for new entrants
  • Recognised and stand-alone

Further information on the Institute’s occupational requirements can be found on our website.

3.3 Treatment of Occupations that Span Multiple Route

Where occupations have knowledge, skills and behaviours that span across multiple routes, the respective route panels will have the opportunity to review and comment on the apprenticeship standard to determine which route is the most appropriate.

An occupation will only appear once across the occupational maps. It will be placed in the map which has the best alignment with its knowledge skills and behaviours.

3.4 Keeping the Occupational Maps up to Date

Each route panel, made up of industry experts, will play the central role in ensuring that the maps remain current and forward looking as they review and approve new apprenticeships. They will also regularly look at strategic issues facing the industries covered by the map.

 

5. Responses to each occupational map

See responses to all the occupational maps

or select the occupational map that you are interested in below.

  1. Agriculture, Environmental and Animal Care
  2. Business and Administration
  3. Care services
  4. Catering and Hospitality
  5. Construction
  6. Creative and Design
  7. Digital
  8. Education and Childcare
  9. Engineering and Manufacturing
  10. Hair and Beauty
  11. Health and Science
  12. Legal, Finance and Accounting
  13. Protective Services
  14. Sales, Marketing and Procurement
  15. Transport and Logistics

Full occupational map consultation response

6. Annex A: The 15 Routes to skilled employment

 

The 15 Routes to skilled employment, as identified by the Sainsbury Review, are:

  1. Agriculture, Environmental and Animal Care
  2. Business and Administration
  3. Care Services
  4. Catering and Hospitality
  5. Construction
  6. Creative and Design
  7. Digital
  8. Education and Childcare
  9. Engineering and Manufacturing
  10. Hair and Beauty
  11. Health and Science
  12. Legal, Finance and Accounting
  13. Protective Services
  14. Sales, Marketing and Procurement
  15. Transport and Logistics

7. Annex B: List of Organisations that Responded to the Consultation

Organisation

Aberdeen Sports Village

Accenture

Access Creative College

Accrington Rossendale College

Active IQ

Active Nation

Adrow Ltd

Agriskills Forum

AHDB

Ambassador Theatre Group

AoC Sport

Arm Ltd

Armonia

Aspire Housing

Association for Project Management

Association of Chartered Certified Accountants

Association of Colleges

Association of Corporate Treasurers

Association of Employment and Learning Providers

Association of Licensed Multiple Retailers (ALMR)

Association of Sound Designers

Aston University Engineering Academy

Atos

Awarding Organisation

Barmcote Dental Practice

Barnet Southgate College

BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT

Beau Sejour Leisure Centre (States of Guernsey)

Bedford college

Berkshire College of Agriculture

BESA

Big Creative Academy (post 16)

Bishop Burton College

Blackburn College

Blackpool and The Fylde College

Blue Cross

Bridgwater and Taunton College

Bristow Helicopters Limited

British Army

British Association of Landscape Industries

British Beer and Pub Association

British Fashion Council

British Florists Association

British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM)

British Library

British Marine

British Printing Industries Federation

British Wheel of Yoga

Brooksby Melton College

BT

Cadcoe

Canterbury Christ Church University

Cardiff Metropolitan University

Chair of the Engineering and Manufacturing, Manufacturing Process Panel

Chameleon School of Construction Ltd

Chartered Institute for the Management of Sport and Physical Activity (CIMSPA)

Chartered Institute of Horticulture

Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx)

Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development

Chartered Institute of Plumbing & Heating Engineering

Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply

Chartered Management Institute

CIBSE

CITB - the Construction Industry Training Board

City & Guilds

Compliance (Air and Water) Limited

Confor: Promoting forestry and wood

Construction & the Built Environment Education Advisory Committee.

Cornwall College

Craven College

Creative & Cultural Skills

Creative Skillset

CREST International

DCMS

Defence Equipment & Support

Design Council

Digital Care Consultancy

Double Negative

Dudley MBC

Dyson School of Design Engineering

Early Childhood Studies Degrees Network (ECSDN)

East Durham College

ECITB

Edens Education Ltd

Edge Hill University

Energy and Utility Skills

Engineering Council

English Heritage Trust

Erewash Borough Council

Esh Training Solutions

Everybody Sport & Recreation

Everything Training Consultants Ltd

Expertina Ltd

Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University

Fareham College

Fashion Retail Academy

FDQ

Flowers by Nattrass

Food and Drink Federation

Football Association

Forestry Commission England

Foster + Partners

Framestore

Freedom PT Training

Fusion Hair and Beauty Consultants Ltd

Fusion Lifestyle

Future Fit Training Ltd

futureCodersSE CIC

Garden Organic

Gateshead College

Geo Strategies Ltd

Goldsmiths - University of London

Goldsmiths' Centre

Greencore Foods

Greenkeepers Training Committee Ltd

Greenwich Leisure LTD

group x training

GTA England

HALF Fish

Hartpury College

Health Education England

Highway Electrical Association

Historic England

Historic Royal Palaces

ICAEW

idverde

IEMA institute of Management and Assessment

Institute of Certified Bookkeepers

Institute of Conservation

Institute of Export & International Trade

Institute of Science & Technology

Institute of Swimming

Institute of the BFA (Training & Education arm)

Institute of The Motor Industry

IQL UK

ITEC North East

Jemini Oxford Ltd

Joseph Chamberlain 6th Form College

Jubilee Hall Trust

KEITS Training Services Ltd

Kingston Maurward College

Land-Based Engineering Training and Education Committee (LE-TEC)

Landex ' Land Based Colleges Aspiring to Excellence'

LDN Group

leadinthewater.com

Leeds Collge of Building

Leisure-net Solutions Ltd

London Borough of Newham

London Institute of Banking and Finance

Long Road VI Form College

Manufacturing Technologies Association

Melanie Webb Flower School

Middlesex FA

MOLA

Morgan Sindall Construction and Infrastructure

Myerscough College

National Archives

National College for Motorsport, part of Bedford College Group

National Day Nurseries Association

National Education Union

National Farmers Union

National Hairdressers Federation

National Heritage Ironwork Group,   and GW Conservation

National Land Based College

National Skills Academy for Financial Services

National Skills Academy for Food and Drink

National Skills Academy for Rail

National Theatre

National Trust

NCFE

Nelson and Colne College

Nest Studios Ltd

New College Durham

New College Pontefract

Newcastle College

NextGen Skills Academy

NOCN

North Lancs Training Group

North West Leicestershire District Council

North West Regional College

Northern Regional College

Not Just Bouquets

Nuffield Health

NWRC

One Dance UK

Pearson

People 1st

Pet Industry Federation

Places for People Leisure

Plymouth City Council 

Plymouth Marjon University, / University of St Mark and St John

Pm Training

Portsmouth College

Powell Dobson Architects Ltd.

Propertymark Qualifications

Queen Elizabeth Hospital King's Lynn NHS Foundation Trust

RCVS

Reaseheath College

Traiblazer Apprenticeship Forestry Sub Group

Revenue service

RG Specialist Solutions Ltd

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Royal Forestry Society

Royal Horticultural Society

Royal Navy

Royal Society of Biology

Royal Society of Chemistry

RSPCA  (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals)

Saipem

Sarah's Designs, Florist Studio

SCC

SCL Education Group

Scunthorpe United Community Sport & Education Trust

Semta

Skills for Care

SLM Ltd "Everyone Active"

Society and College of Radiographers

Society for Editors and Proofreaders

Solent University

Space Engineering Services

Sport England

St Brendan's Sixth Form

Sunderland College

T level Financial Panel

T level Legal Panel

T Level Panel Construction BSE Pathway

T Level Panel Healthcare Science

T level Science Panel  (Combined Response)

T2 Consulting

Tarmac

Tate

Technician Apprenticeship Consortium (TAC)

Thatch Advice Centre

Thomas Cook Airlines

Towards Vision

Truro & Penwith College

Tyne Metropolitan college

UAL Awarding Body (a department of University of the Arts London).

UK Screen Alliance

UK STEM Ltd

ukactive

Uniper Technologies Limited

United Kingdom Fashion & Textile Association (UKFT)

Unity Software

University of Bolton

University of Central Lancashire

University of Cumbria

University of Derby

University of East London

University of Northampton

University of Sheffield / Dental Schools Council

University of Warwick

University of Wolverhampton

Vets4Pets

Victoria & Albert Museum

Virgin Active

W A Livesey - Independent Consultant

Watford Borough Council

Welsh Grooming Academy

West Malling Flowers Ltd

West Nottinghamshire College

White Light Ltd

YMCA Awards

York Conferences Ltd

8. Annex C: Glossary

Apprenticeship Standard: An apprenticeship standard describes the occupation it addresses in terms of the knowledge, skills and behaviours required to perform the role effectively. Some standards can cover more than one occupation – and these are often included as core and options

Cluster: Each Occupational Map is divided into pathways and then clusters. A cluster  brings together occupations with similar training requirements at broadly the same level.

Core and Options: Core and options within an apprenticeship standard help to avoid having multiple standards with very similar knowledge, skills and behaviours with a singular specialism. These standards define the core knowledge skills and behaviours, and then provide options with the knowledge skills and behaviours required for the specialism. On the map the standards are in bold, with the options underneath.

Occupation:  An occupation is defined as a set of jobs whose main tasks and duties are characterised by a high degree of similarity.  The Institute has a set of requirements, used as part of the approvals process, which must be met for an occupation to be judged appropriate for an apprenticeship standard or T level. The occupations proposed for inclusion in the maps have been assessed against these requirements, as far as the available evidence has allowed. 

The Institute’s requirements for an occupation are for it to be:

  • Transferable to a range of employers
  • Sufficiently broad, deep and skilled to require at least a year of employment and training, with 20% of this being off-the-job
  • Capable of providing full occupational competence for new entrants
  • Recognised and stand-alone

Each occupation is allocated a level, which should reflect the content of its knowledge, skills and behaviours. Level 2 is an intermediate level, equivalent to that of a GCSE.  Level 3 is an advanced level, equivalent to that of an A-Level. Levels 4 and 5 are higher levels, equivalent to that of a foundation degree or above. Levels 6 and 7 are degree levels, equivalent to a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree respectively.

  • Technical Occupations are the skilled occupations that a school or college leaver would be entering and are typically at level 2 or 3. T-level qualifications will be developed for many of the occupations shown at this level.
  • Higher Technical Occupations require more knowledge and skills acquired through experience in the workplace, further technical education or a higher apprenticeship, and are typically at levels 4 or 5.
  • Professional Occupations show only degree apprenticeships and occupations where a clear progression from higher technical occupations has been identified. They are typically at Levels 6 and 7 and do not cover all professional roles.

Pathways: On each Occupational Map, pathways are used to provide further groupings of occupations with similar KSBs within each route, and give an indication of possible career progression.

Route panels: These are 15 sector-based panels of industry experts (one for each map) who review and make considered determinations on whether or not to approve new or revised occupations, occupational standards, assessment plans and funding bands. They bring a strategic perspective across each route and effectively ‘own’ the route map.

Occupational Standards: These detail the knowledge, skills and behaviours required for a particular occupation and can be divided into the following categories depending on their level of development:

  • Decommissioned standards is an apprenticeship standard where development that has stalled for a considerable period and the Institute no longer provides support. This can happen for a variety of reasons, such as employers not being able to commit to develop a standard, or having disbanded, or there is no longer a need for the standard.
  • Published standards are standards that are fully developed, and delivery of the standard can begin. However the Assessment Plan has yet to be approved, and no funding band has been allocated. They are amber on the Occupational maps.
  • Standards approved for delivery are fully developed standards, including having an approved assessment plan, and a funding band allocated. They are ready for delivery by employers. They are green on the Occupational maps.
  • Standards in development. This is where the proposal to develop the standard has been approved by the route panel, and the Trailblazer Group is developing it. They are red on the Occupational maps.
  • Standards (occupations) awaiting development. These are standards/occupations where the route panel has identified an employer/industry need, however a Trailblazer Group has yet to be formed to develop it. These standards provide a future focus to the maps, and will be added to as route panels identify employer/industry need. They are black on the occupational map. 

Trailblazer Groups: These are groups of employers that come together as the creators and early adopters of new apprenticeship standards. Focused on the specific knowledge, skills and behaviours for their sector, they work together, supported and guided by the Institute for Apprenticeships, to develop new programmes of learning that will directly impact their workforce.