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Craft assistant

This apprenticeship is in development and is subject to change

Why is this apprenticeship not ready for delivery?

An apprenticeship is only available for delivery when both the standard and assessment plan is approved and a funding band (core government contribution) has been assigned to the standard.

How can I get involved?

If you'd like to get involved and contribute to the development of this apprenticeship, please read about developing standards and assessment plans. You can email the trailblazer contact using the details on this page.

Key information

  1. Status: In development
  2. Ticked Proposal approved
    Ticked Occupational standard approved
    Ticked End-point assessment plan approved
  3. Reference: ST0919
  4. Level: 3
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 18 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Route: Creative and design
  8. Date updated: 27/01/2023
  9. EQA provider: Ofqual
  10. Review:

    This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

This apprenticeship has options. This document is currently showing the following option:

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Contents

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in a range of settings including specialist craft businesses, design studios, production workshops, restoration and conservation businesses, training establishments, cultural institutions such as museums, galleries and heritage sites, corporate businesses, and the natural environment. Employers are typically known to be micro businesses and SMEs. However, craft assistants can occasionally be found in larger organisations in the public, private and charity sectors. Craft assistants may also progress into freelance work or operate as sole traders once sufficient skills and experience are gained.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to design and deliver hand-crafted products. Craft assistants make, service, restore or conserve individual hand-crafted items and do so for customers, clients, public or private collections or the built or natural environment. Craft assistants will work with a range of materials such as textiles, moldable and rigid materials, paper, glass, clay etc. Typically, the businesses craft assistants are employed by specialise in a selected craft and an individual in this role will achieve occupational competence in that craft. Craft assistants provide technical support to ensure new or existing items, to be made or restored by hand, are designed, developed, and created in line with company and client requirements. Increasingly, the integration of digital technologies across this sector will support production processes while retaining unique craft qualities through hybrid manufactured and handmade production. Craft assistants must adhere to the organisation’s confidentiality requirements and understand basic copyrighting and intellectual property arrangements. Working with discretion, taking positive action in response to feedback, being solution focused, and maintaining awareness of the bigger picture, including budget and broader resource constraints and environmental impacts and ways to reduce these, are essential to a craft assistants approach.

In their daily work, craft assistants are expected to work collaboratively with other designers and craft practitioners, customers, clients, wider team members such as administrators, distributors, marketers, retailers, suppliers and external stakeholders. Craft assistants work to agreed deadlines as part of a team but are expected to work with autonomy once sufficient skill and knowledge is obtained. Whilst training, craft assistants work alongside, and under the instruction of, a master craftsperson and are sometimes responsible for creating component parts of a product that the master craftsperson would use to finish the product.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for effective client communication, demonstrating sound project management and project delivery skills. They will be competent in the processes, materials, and tools used to create the specified hand-made products of the business they are employed by. Craft assistants will demonstrate a sound understanding of sustainable practices including the sourcing, use, disposal, recycling and reuse of materials across the craft industry.

Craft assistants are responsible for maintaining the workspace and its contents in line with the business’ standards and health and safety requirements. They will also assist with the creation and managing of databases, client and customer information, and ongoing ordering and control of stock.

Craft assistants would be expected to have an understanding of working with customers and clients and may also be expected to liaise with them throughout the making process to aid in any relevant item aftercare.

Typical job titles include:

Assistant maker Ceramics technician Craft technician Design assistant Junior craft practitioner Studio assistant Workshop technician

Core occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Utilise technology as an enabler to make hand crafted items within the social, cultural, economic, technological and environmental contexts impacting craft.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K14 K21

S2 S3 S5

B1 B2 B4 B5

Duty 2 Make products or component parts of products by hand in line with the settings quality standards, confidentiality policies and intellectual property requirements.

K1 K2 K8 K18

S1 S3 S5 S15

B1 B2 B4 B5

Duty 3 Focus on sustainability, research and develop green production techniques, processes and the use of recycled materials.

K7 K20

S3

B2 B5

Duty 4 Maintain equipment and the workspace, and store tools in line with the settings standards and health and safety requirements.

K8 K10 K12 K21

S4 S5 S6

B1

Duty 5 Record and control materials, items, stock, products and suitably store these to maintain their fitness for use.

K10 K12

S4 S10

B1

Duty 6 Order or recommend materials and tools in line with the settingss procurement policies and processes following stock management procedures as needed to achieve value for money.

K10 K11 K12 K17

S8 S10 S11

Duty 7 Follow agreed plans, designs or brief to aid the successful creation of a specified hand-made product within time and cost constraints.

K7 K9

S7 S9 S12

B4

Duty 8 Manage customer and client expectations by maintaining regular communication and delivering effective project management, budget tracking, troubleshooting, project delivery and timekeeping.

K9 K13 K16 K17

S7 S8 S9 S11

B3 B4 B6

Duty 9 Utilise technology to communicate, market and sell hand-made items effectively.

K14 K15 K17 K19

S11

B3 B6

Duty 10 Provide excellent and inclusive service and relationship management to a diverse range of customers and clients .

K9 K13 K16 K17

S11

B3 B6

Duty 11 Package and present products in line with the settings standards, procedures an customer or client requirements.

K15 K19 K20

S12 S13

B3 B6

Option duties

Ceramicist duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 12 Make, service, restore, and or conserve ceramic items for customers, clients public or private collections.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K14 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K32 K33

S1 S2 S3 S5 S14 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S21

B1 B2 B4 B5

Duty 13 Manage the planning or design process for hand-made ceramic products.

K8 K9 K22 K26 K31

S7 S9 S14

Duty 14 Work with customers and clients to understand their requirements, creating technical or other drawings and plans (by hand or digital) for the product as needed.

K9 K13 K17 K22 K31 K32 K33

S7 S11 S14 S20 S21

B3 B4 B6

Duty 15 Create samples or prototypes to assist in the creation of hand-made ceramic products.

K14 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K32 K33

S1 S2 S3 S5 S14 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S21

B1 B4 B5


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Craft industry: the impact on places, communities, and society, and importance to individuals. Back to Duty

K2: Key technological developments in the history of your chosen craft. Back to Duty

K3: The financial environment of the craft sector: external factors impacting it, the economic contribution craft makes. Back to Duty

K4: The different types of craft businesses and support organisations. Back to Duty

K5: Craft industry income streams such as public and private subsidy, teaching. Community outreach, and product sales. Back to Duty

K6: Craft and well being settings such as schools, hospitals, residential care homes, community outreach projects, historical sites and workplaces. Support that craft makers can provide. Back to Duty

K7: The environmental impact of your chosen craft. The steps being taken by craft makers and businesses to operate in a more environmentally sustainable way such as sourcing of materials, sustainable production and distribution processes. Back to Duty

K8: The types of hand and machine operated tools used by craft makers within your chosen craft. The crafts or materials they are typically used for. Back to Duty

K9: The project lifecycle: the design brief or specification. Factors that aid project success: customer and client liaison, team working, budget management, project mapping (production scheduling) and problem solving. Back to Duty

K10: Stock management and recording systems. Back to Duty

K11: Types of suppliers. Supplier research and sourcing methods. Supplier choice factors: financial competitiveness, environmental sustainability, and quality. Back to Duty

K12: Storage for tools, materials and products. Back to Duty

K13: Stakeholder management key principles. Back to Duty

K14: How digital tools and technology may be used to support productivity and delivery: CAD (computer-aided design) and 3D printing. Back to Duty

K15: The different routes to market such as physical retail, online retail, commissions, selling events (markets and fairs), galleries and exhibitions, open studios and catalogues. Back to Duty

K16: Communication techniques: verbal, written, and digital; use industry terminology. Back to Duty

K17: Communication channels: specialist networking, social media, press, open studios, web Back to Duty

K18: Fundamentals that apply to copyrighting and intellectual property and how to protect craft items from external exploitation. Back to Duty

K19: Quality assurance, inspection, and sampling methods. Back to Duty

K20: The properties, environmental impact, and benefits of eco-friendly or recycled materials used in packing. Back to Duty

K21: Health and Safety; regulations: the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), the Health and Safety At Work Act (HASAWA), the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR), and manual handling as applicable to your craft activities. Back to Duty

K22: Ceramic item manufacture key factors: use and function, size, shape, ergonomics, fitness for purpose, and production scale. Back to Duty

K23: The types of clay used to make ceramic items, their properties, and suitability for use such as: white earthenware, red or iron terracotta earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, bone china and fine bone china. Back to Duty

K24: Characteristics and states of clay for industrial or studio production such as: slip, wet clay, leather hard, bone dry, bisque fired, glaze fired, post firing techniques, and vitrified. Back to Duty

K25: Clay preparation methods such as: wedging, kneading, pugging and filter pressing. Back to Duty

K26: Ceramic production techniques such as throwing, slab work, coiling, press moulding, slip casting, jigger and jollying, ram pressing and high pressure casting. Back to Duty

K27: Ways that decorations can be applied to ceramic items such as: stamping, embossing, sprig work, brushwork, glaze, decals and sgraffito. Back to Duty

K28: Kiln and firing types such as: electric kiln, gas fired kilns, and wood or coal fired reduction firing. The use and effect of different temperatures. The stages of firing including bisque and glaze firings. Back to Duty

K29: The types and properties of glazes. Which to use for the type of clay or material being used. The use of pigments and underglazes, biaxal and triaxal glazes, and glaze recipes. Back to Duty

K30: The different production processes: batch production, limited run, and mass production. Back to Duty

K31: Uses for ceramic products such as personal, public, commercial, industrial and bespoke commissions. Back to Duty

K32: Design principles such as line, texture, size, shape, form, colour, volume, proportion. Back to Duty

K33: Read drawings and interpret prototypes or models. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Select and use tools and equipment. Back to Duty

S2: Use technology as an enabler to make hand-crafted items, models or prototypes. Back to Duty

S3: Identify sustainable techniques to make hand crafted items. Back to Duty

S4: Store tools and materials, ensuring they are protected from damage when not in use. Back to Duty

S5: Follow health and safety procedures. Back to Duty

S6: Clean, maintain and prepare the craft workspace or workshop. Back to Duty

S7: The roles, responsibilities and interdependencies of different parties in a project and your role within this. Back to Duty

S8: Identify costs. Deploy controls to enable effective budget management. Back to Duty

S9: Manage projects on time and budget. Maintain reputational standards and mitigate legal risks. Back to Duty

S10: Conduct stock control and liaise with suppliers. Back to Duty

S11: Communicate with stakeholders, colleagues or customers. Back to Duty

S12: Follow quality assurance procedures. Back to Duty

S13: Select packaging for craft items to protect them whilst in transit. Present items as per the organisation’s or client or customer needs. Back to Duty

S14: Make ceramic items, prototypes or models in line with the brief. Consider: purpose, end user, market, and budget. Back to Duty

S15: Use specialist tools and equipment required for specific purposes. Back to Duty

S16: Apply design principles to the making of ceramic items, in line with the brief including shape, size, proportion, colour and finish. Back to Duty

S17: Select and use clay or material for the ceramic item being made. Back to Duty

S18: Use making skills for example hand building, sculpting, throwing, casting, moulding, and tool crafting or equivalent. Back to Duty

S19: Select and use finishing techniques or glazes to be applied to the final ceramic product. Back to Duty

S20: Assess the finished ceramic item against the brief and the production schedule including efficiency and wastage, quality, budget. Back to Duty

S21: Use drawn plans (hand or digital), prototypes or models to aid the making of a hand-made ceramic product. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Puts safety first. Back to Duty

B2: Committed to keeping up to date with new technologies and industry best practice. Back to Duty

B3: Acts in a way that builds and maintains positive relationships with colleagues and others. Back to Duty

B4: Takes ownership of work. Back to Duty

B5: Sources solutions and seeks to continuously improve and develop. Back to Duty

B6: Acts in a professional and ethical manner, embracing equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the craft assistant apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Craft assistant apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 18 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a craft assistant. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 3 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - project with questioning:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 3 - observation with questions:

  • fail
  • pass

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme (typically 18 months)
The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence.

End-point assessment gateway
The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the occupational standard as a craft assistant
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must achieve all of the qualifications listed in the Craft assistant occupational standard ST0919 relevant to their chosen option.

The apprentice must have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

For the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit a Portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment (typically 3 months)
Grades available for each assessment method:

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Project with questioning

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Observation with questions

  • fail
  • pass

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction
Re-sits and re-takes



  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: pass
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically 3 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically 6 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 3 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think their apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard. The apprentice will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit Portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 15 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records
  • work products for example: images of models, protypes, finished products
  • drawings, models or prototypes
  • workplace policies and procedures
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the interview. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the interview. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The observation assessment must take place at the stage when the apprentice can be observed in their working environment and able to demonstrate their making skills being applied to the product.

The rationale is to ensure resource and material efficiency and to enable the apprentice to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this method whilst the apprentice is undertaking the "making skills" element of their project.

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the interview, an independent assessor asks the apprentice questions.The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

  • it allows for assessment of KSBs that do not occur on a predicable or regular basis and may not naturally be assessed as part of the project,
  • it allows for testing of responses where there are a range of potential answers,
  • it is a cost effective, as whilst seeking assurance of competence across a range of KSBs, it does not require the independent assessor to directly observe all of them, reducing their time cost and cost of materials.

Delivery

The interview must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the interview.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to cover the following topics:

  • history
  • business management
  • project management
  • customer relations
  • product management

The EPAO must give an apprentice 2 weeks notice of the interview.

The independent assessor must have at least 1 week(s) to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the interview.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The interview must last for 60 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the interview by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 10 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required. The independent assessor must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The interview must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The interview can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The interview should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Project with questioning

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must start after the apprentice has gone through the gateway. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The project with questioning is a discrete assessment method. The observation must take place at the stage when the apprentice can be observed in their working environment and able to demonstrate their making skills being applied to the product. This is resource efficient and allows the apprentice to demonstrate the KSBs related to making skills at the most suitable time during the development of the product.

The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship. The EPAO must confirm that it provides the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • project with a project output
  • question and answer session

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

  • it allows for a range of craft based activities to be demonstrated,
  • it allows for assessment of KSBs that do not occur on a predicable or regular basis and may not naturally be assessed as part of the practical assessment.

Component 1: Project with a project output

Delivery

The project with questioning must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The apprentice’s project can be based on any of the following:

  • in response to a commission
  • a client request
  • an idea or opportunity

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable.

The project output must be in the form of a product.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. They must complete the product for EPAO review by the end of week 7 of the EPA period. The observation assessment must take place at the stage when the apprentice can be observed applying making skills to the product. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within this period, to plan and complete their project. The apprentice must complete their project and the production of its components unaided.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project which could include technical internal or external support. However, the project output must be the apprentice’s own work and reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm that the project output(s) is the apprentice’s own work when it is submitted.

The product must include at least: an output of a ceramic product, using hand skills for the majority of the making process and includes at least the use of drawings or a prototype or model.

The apprentice must:

  • make a ceramic product using a range of techniques and suitable materials,
  • devise a strategy for firing to ensure successful completion,
  • present appropriate proposals for transportation packaging.

Component 2: Question and answer session

Delivery

The EPAO must give the apprentice 1 weeks notice of the presentation or question and answer session.

Apprentices will be required to answer questions based on their project output.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to ask questions in relation to the underpinning knowledge, skills and behaviours where the project deliverables do not provide sufficient evidence to meet the grading descriptors.

The questioning should cover:

  • budget setting and management,
  • supplier and stock management,
  • project management,
  • customer relations and communication,
  • sustainability,
  • quality assurance.

The independent assessor must have at least 1 hour to review the project and project output(s) in advance of the question and answer session to allow them to prepare questions.

The question and answer session will be arranged by the EPAO in consultation with the employer and apprentice. The question and answer session should take place on a one-to-one basis, either face-to-face or via online video conferencing.

The question and answer session must last for 30 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the total time by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete their last point or respond to a question if necessary. The question and answer session must allow the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs at the highest possible grade.

The independent assessor must ask at least 6 questions. They must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The independent assessor must use the full time available for questioning.

Those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to show with the product can instead be covered by questioning, although these should be kept to a minimum.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The project components must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs demonstrated in the product and presentation
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The question and answer session must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises). The question and answer session should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The question and answer session can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the project with questioning:

  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Observation with questions

Overview

In the observation with questions, an independent assessor observes the apprentice in their workplace and asks questions. The apprentice completes their day-to-day duties under normal working conditions. Simulation is not permitted. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The employer must liaise with the EPAO to schedule the observation within the 7 week project timeframe. This is to ensure assessment of the KSBs mapped to the observation assessment method.

Rationale

The observation assessment must take place at the stage when the apprentice can be observed in their working environment and able to demonstrate their making skills being applied to the product.

The rationale is to ensure resource and material efficiency and to enable the apprentice to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this method whilst the apprentice is undertaking the "making skills" element of their project.

Delivery

The observation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the observation with questions.

The independent assessor must only observe one apprentice at a time to ensure quality and rigour. They must be as unobtrusive as possible.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 1 weeks notice of the observation with questions.

The observation must take 2 hours.

The independent assessor can increase the time of the observation with questions by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete a task or respond to a question if necessary.

The observation may be split into discrete sections held on the same working day.

The EPAO must manage invigilation of the apprentice during the assessment, to maintain security of the EPA, in line with their malpractice policy. This includes breaks and moving between locations during the working day.

The independent assessor must explain to the apprentice the format and timescales of the observation with questions before it starts. This does not count towards the assessment time.

The independent assessor should observe the following during the observation:

1. The apprentice applying making skills.

2. The apprentice preparing, maintaining and cleaning the workspace.

3. Adherence to health and safety procedures.

4. The apprentice using and storing tools.

These activities provide the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is to test the breadth and depth of knowledge for each task. To ask questions where a KSB is not directly observed.

The independent assessor must ask questions. Questioning can occur both during and the observation. The time for questioning is included in the overall assessment time. The independent assessor must ask at least 4 questions. To remain as unobtrusive as possible, the independent assessor should ask questions during natural stops between tasks and after completion of work rather than disrupting the apprentice’s flow. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must ask questions about KSBs that were not observed to gather assessment evidence. These questions are in addition to the above set number of questions for the observation with questions and should be kept to a minimum.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The observation and responses to questions must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs observed
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The observation with questions must take place in the apprentice’s normal place of work (for example their employer’s premises or a customer’s premises). Equipment and resources needed for the observation must be provided by the employer and be in good and safe working condition.   

Questioning that occurs after the observation should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the observation with questions:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Grading

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
(Core) Industry, contexts and settings
K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K18 B2 B5

Describes the different craft business and organisations and

explains the support craft makers can provide in wellbeing settings and the impact of craft on communities, society and individuals.

K1, K4, K6

Describes the financial environment of the craft sector and craft industry income streams. 

K3, K5

Explains the fundamental requirements of copyright and intellectual property and how to protect craft items from external exploitation.

K18

Explains the key technological developments of their chosen craft , how they keep up to date with new technologies and industry best practice and how they seek to continuously improve and develop

K2, B2, B5

Explain the environmental impact of your craft and the steps being taken to operate in a more sustainable way 

K7

 

Evaluates the financial environment of the craft sector: external factors impacting it, the economic contribution craft makes.

K3

Evaluates the steps being taken by craft makers and businesses to operate in a more environmentally sustainable way.

K7

 

(Core) Stakeholder Management
K13 S7

Explains key principles of stakeholder management and how stakeholder interdependencies are managed throughout a project.

K13, S7

 

 

 

No distinction grading criteria.

(ceramicist) Clay
K23 K24 K25

Describes the properties of the different types of clay used to make ceramic items for different purposes and the different clay preparation methods.

K23, K24, K25

 

Justifies the type of clay used to make particular ceramic items and evaluates the clay preparation methods.

K23, K24, K25

 

(ceramicist) Production
K26 K28 K29 K30 K31

Explains the different ceramic production techniques and processes and the various uses for ceramic products

K26, K30, K31

 

Describes  the types and properties of glazes, pigments and underglazes and the types of clay and materials they are used for. 

K29

Describes the different kilns and firing types, the stages of firing and the use and effect of different temperatures. Explains about kiln and firing types and the effect of temperature. Explains the stages of firing.

K28

 

 

Evaluates the different production processes and techniques. 

K26, K30

Evaluates their use of a particular type of glaze and the outcome achieved

K29

 

Project with questioning

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
(Core) Project management
K9 K14 K15 K19 S8 S9 S12

Explains the project lifecycle and different routes to market. Explains how they identify costs and deploy effective budget management techniques to deliver projects on time and on budget to maintain reputational standards and mitigate legal risks.

K9, K15, S8, S9

Explains the digital tools  they use to support productivity.

K14

Explains how they sample, quality assure and inspect products.

K19, S12

 

Evaluates the different routes to market: physical retail, online retail, commissions, selling events (markets and fairs), galleries and exhibitions, open studios, catalogues.

K15

 

Evaluates the impact on reputational standards and mitigating legal risks of incorrectly identifying costs and not deploying effective budget management to manage projects on time and budget.

K9, S8, S9

 

 

(Core) Stock management
K10 K11 S10

Explains the types of suppliers and how to conduct stock control.

K10, K11, S10

 

No distinction grading criteria.

(Core) Communication
K16 K17 S11 B3 B6

Explains the communication channels and techniques they use to communicate with stakeholders to build professional and positive relationships.

K16, K17, S11, B3, B6

No distinction grading criteria.

(Core) sustainability
K20 S3 S13

Uses sustainable techniques to make and deliver hand crafted products. Selects and uses suitable packaging to protect the product in transit, considering the environmental impact of packaging.

K20, S3, S13

 

No distinction grading criteria.

(Core) Making
S2 B4

Uses technology as an enabler to make hand crafted items, models and prototypes, taking ownership of work.

S2, B4

 

No distinction grading criteria.

(ceramicist) Production
K22 K27 K32 K33 S14 S16 S19 S20 S21

Reads drawings and uses plans, prototypes or models to aid the making of a product taking into consideration purpose, end user, market and budget. Applies design principles and decorations to the making of a ceramic product. Assesses the finished ceramic item against the brief and production schedule.

K22, K27, K32, K33, S14, S16, S19, S20, S21

Demonstrates skilful application, of selecting appropriately to meet design principles (with considered or thoughtful execution.) of the design requirements and justifies their choice of making skills and decorations 

S16, S17

Reflects on plans for the product and evaluates any changes needed to their approach to the finished ceramic item against the brief and the production schedule.

S20

Observation with questions

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
(Core) Tools
K8 K12 S1 S4 S6 S15

Prepares the workspace, selects and safely use hand, specialist  and machine operated tools and equipment. Stores tools to ensure they are protected from damage Cleans and maintains the workspace.

K8, K12, S1, S4, S6, S15

 

(Core) Health and safety
K21 S5 B1

Follows health and safety regulations, putting safety first.

K21, S5, B1

(ceramicist) Making
S17 S18

Selects and uses clay or material to make a ceramic item. Demonstrates making skills to achieve the task.

S17, S18

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the apprenticeship grade of:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the: interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, project with questioning and observation with questions in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they will be awarded an overall fail. 

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall merit, the apprentice must achieve a pass in the interview supported by a portfolio of evidence and a distinction in the project and questioning or the apprentice must achieve a distinction in the interview supported by a portfolio of evidence and a pass in the project and questioning . To achieve an overall EPA distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in all assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Project with questioning Observation with questions Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Pass Merit
Pass Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Pass Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

An apprentice who fails one or more assessment method(s) can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

An apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 6 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

An apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements 
  • undertake the EPA  

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA 
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan 
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis 
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:  

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner 
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO) 
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship 
  • understand the occupational standard 
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA 
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan 
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working 
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA  
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading 
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA 
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible 
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer 
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace 
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders 
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes 
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used) 
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually) 
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy 
  • verify the identity of the apprentice  
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan 
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA 
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation 
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan 
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • attend induction training 
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship  
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan  
  • assess the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan  
  • make the grading decisions 
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner 
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures 

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must: 

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard 
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan 
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning 
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA 

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to how the EPAO ensures valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. The EPAO must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section:

The EPAO must also:

  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 3 gained in the last 5 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
    • meet the following minimum requirements:

      they should have practised their occupational experience within the last 3 years. their skills and knowledge may be supported by academic experience.

  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider.

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

Professional body recognition is not relevant to this occupational apprenticeship.

Mapping of KSBs to assessment methods

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1: Core.

Craft industry: the impact on places, communities, and society, and importance to individuals.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K2: Core.

Key technological developments in the history of your chosen craft.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K3: Core.

The financial environment of the craft sector: external factors impacting it, the economic contribution craft makes.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K4: Core.

The different types of craft businesses and support organisations.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K5: Core.

Craft industry income streams such as public and private subsidy, teaching. Community outreach, and product sales.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K6: Core.

Craft and well being settings such as schools, hospitals, residential care homes, community outreach projects, historical sites and workplaces. Support that craft makers can provide.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K7: Core.

The environmental impact of your chosen craft. The steps being taken by craft makers and businesses to operate in a more environmentally sustainable way such as sourcing of materials, sustainable production and distribution processes.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K8: Core.

The types of hand and machine operated tools used by craft makers within your chosen craft. The crafts or materials they are typically used for.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K9: Core.

The project lifecycle: the design brief or specification. Factors that aid project success: customer and client liaison, team working, budget management, project mapping (production scheduling) and problem solving.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K10: Core.

Stock management and recording systems.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K11: Core.

Types of suppliers. Supplier research and sourcing methods. Supplier choice factors: financial competitiveness, environmental sustainability, and quality.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K12: Core.

Storage for tools, materials and products.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K13: Core.

Stakeholder management key principles.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K14: Core.

How digital tools and technology may be used to support productivity and delivery: CAD (computer-aided design) and 3D printing.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K15: Core.

The different routes to market such as physical retail, online retail, commissions, selling events (markets and fairs), galleries and exhibitions, open studios and catalogues.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K16: Core.

Communication techniques: verbal, written, and digital; use industry terminology.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K17: Core.

Communication channels: specialist networking, social media, press, open studios, web

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K18: Core.

Fundamentals that apply to copyrighting and intellectual property and how to protect craft items from external exploitation.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19: Core.

Quality assurance, inspection, and sampling methods.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K20: Core.

The properties, environmental impact, and benefits of eco-friendly or recycled materials used in packing.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K21: Core.

Health and Safety; regulations: the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), the Health and Safety At Work Act (HASAWA), the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR), and manual handling as applicable to your craft activities.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K22: Ceramicist.

Ceramic item manufacture key factors: use and function, size, shape, ergonomics, fitness for purpose, and production scale.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K23: Ceramicist.

The types of clay used to make ceramic items, their properties, and suitability for use such as: white earthenware, red or iron terracotta earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, bone china and fine bone china.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K24: Ceramicist.

Characteristics and states of clay for industrial or studio production such as: slip, wet clay, leather hard, bone dry, bisque fired, glaze fired, post firing techniques, and vitrified.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K25: Ceramicist.

Clay preparation methods such as: wedging, kneading, pugging and filter pressing.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K26: Ceramicist.

Ceramic production techniques such as throwing, slab work, coiling, press moulding, slip casting, jigger and jollying, ram pressing and high pressure casting.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K27: Ceramicist.

Ways that decorations can be applied to ceramic items such as: stamping, embossing, sprig work, brushwork, glaze, decals and sgraffito.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K28: Ceramicist.

Kiln and firing types such as: electric kiln, gas fired kilns, and wood or coal fired reduction firing. The use and effect of different temperatures. The stages of firing including bisque and glaze firings.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K29: Ceramicist.

The types and properties of glazes. Which to use for the type of clay or material being used. The use of pigments and underglazes, biaxal and triaxal glazes, and glaze recipes.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K30: Ceramicist.

The different production processes: batch production, limited run, and mass production.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K31: Ceramicist.

Uses for ceramic products such as personal, public, commercial, industrial and bespoke commissions.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K32: Ceramicist.

Design principles such as line, texture, size, shape, form, colour, volume, proportion.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
K33: Ceramicist.

Read drawings and interpret prototypes or models.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
Skill Assessment methods
S1: Core.

Select and use tools and equipment.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S2: Core.

Use technology as an enabler to make hand-crafted items, models or prototypes.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S3: Core.

Identify sustainable techniques to make hand crafted items.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S4: Core.

Store tools and materials, ensuring they are protected from damage when not in use.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S5: Core.

Follow health and safety procedures.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S6: Core.

Clean, maintain and prepare the craft workspace or workshop.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S7: Core.

The roles, responsibilities and interdependencies of different parties in a project and your role within this.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S8: Core.

Identify costs. Deploy controls to enable effective budget management.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S9: Core.

Manage projects on time and budget. Maintain reputational standards and mitigate legal risks.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S10: Core.

Conduct stock control and liaise with suppliers.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S11: Core.

Communicate with stakeholders, colleagues or customers.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S12: Core.

Follow quality assurance procedures.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S13: Core.

Select packaging for craft items to protect them whilst in transit. Present items as per the organisation’s or client or customer needs.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S14: Ceramicist.

Make ceramic items, prototypes or models in line with the brief. Consider: purpose, end user, market, and budget.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S15: Core.

Use specialist tools and equipment required for specific purposes.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S16: Ceramicist.

Apply design principles to the making of ceramic items, in line with the brief including shape, size, proportion, colour and finish.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S17: Ceramicist.

Select and use clay or material for the ceramic item being made.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S18: Ceramicist.

Use making skills for example hand building, sculpting, throwing, casting, moulding, and tool crafting or equivalent.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S19: Ceramicist.

Select and use finishing techniques or glazes to be applied to the final ceramic product.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S20: Ceramicist.

Assess the finished ceramic item against the brief and the production schedule including efficiency and wastage, quality, budget.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
S21: Ceramicist.

Use drawn plans (hand or digital), prototypes or models to aid the making of a hand-made ceramic product.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1: Core.

Puts safety first.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
B2: Core.

Committed to keeping up to date with new technologies and industry best practice.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3: Core.

Acts in a way that builds and maintains positive relationships with colleagues and others.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
B4: Core.

Takes ownership of work.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning
B5: Core.

Sources solutions and seeks to continuously improve and develop.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B6: Core.

Acts in a professional and ethical manner, embracing equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Back to Grading
Project with questioning

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence - Discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Industry, contexts and settings
K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K18

B2 B5

Craft industry: the impact on places, communities, and society, and importance to individuals. (K1)

Key technological developments in the history of your chosen craft. (K2)

The financial environment of the craft sector: external factors impacting it, the economic contribution craft makes. (K3)

The different types of craft businesses and support organisations. (K4)

Craft industry income streams such as public and private subsidy, teaching. Community outreach, and product sales. (K5)

Craft and well being settings such as schools, hospitals, residential care homes, community outreach projects, historical sites and workplaces. Support that craft makers can provide. (K6)

The environmental impact of your chosen craft. The steps being taken by craft makers and businesses to operate in a more environmentally sustainable way such as sourcing of materials, sustainable production and distribution processes. (K7)

Fundamentals that apply to copyrighting and intellectual property and how to protect craft items from external exploitation. (K18)

N/A

Committed to keeping up to date with new technologies and industry best practice. (B2)

Sources solutions and seeks to continuously improve and develop. (B5)

(Core) Stakeholder Management
K13
S7

Stakeholder management key principles. (K13)

The roles, responsibilities and interdependencies of different parties in a project and your role within this. (S7)

N/A

(ceramicist) Clay
K23 K24 K25

The types of clay used to make ceramic items, their properties, and suitability for use such as: white earthenware, red or iron terracotta earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, bone china and fine bone china. (K23)

Characteristics and states of clay for industrial or studio production such as: slip, wet clay, leather hard, bone dry, bisque fired, glaze fired, post firing techniques, and vitrified. (K24)

Clay preparation methods such as: wedging, kneading, pugging and filter pressing. (K25)

N/A

N/A

(ceramicist) Production
K26 K28 K29 K30 K31

Ceramic production techniques such as throwing, slab work, coiling, press moulding, slip casting, jigger and jollying, ram pressing and high pressure casting. (K26)

Kiln and firing types such as: electric kiln, gas fired kilns, and wood or coal fired reduction firing. The use and effect of different temperatures. The stages of firing including bisque and glaze firings. (K28)

The types and properties of glazes. Which to use for the type of clay or material being used. The use of pigments and underglazes, biaxal and triaxal glazes, and glaze recipes. (K29)

The different production processes: batch production, limited run, and mass production. (K30)

Uses for ceramic products such as personal, public, commercial, industrial and bespoke commissions. (K31)

N/A

N/A

Project with questioning - Project

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Project management
K9 K14 K15 K19
S8 S9 S12

The project lifecycle: the design brief or specification. Factors that aid project success: customer and client liaison, team working, budget management, project mapping (production scheduling) and problem solving. (K9)

How digital tools and technology may be used to support productivity and delivery: CAD (computer-aided design) and 3D printing. (K14)

The different routes to market such as physical retail, online retail, commissions, selling events (markets and fairs), galleries and exhibitions, open studios and catalogues. (K15)

Quality assurance, inspection, and sampling methods. (K19)

Identify costs. Deploy controls to enable effective budget management. (S8)

Manage projects on time and budget. Maintain reputational standards and mitigate legal risks. (S9)

Follow quality assurance procedures. (S12)

N/A

(Core) Stock management
K10 K11
S10

Stock management and recording systems. (K10)

Types of suppliers. Supplier research and sourcing methods. Supplier choice factors: financial competitiveness, environmental sustainability, and quality. (K11)

Conduct stock control and liaise with suppliers. (S10)

N/A

(Core) Communication
K16 K17
S11
B3 B6

Communication techniques: verbal, written, and digital; use industry terminology. (K16)

Communication channels: specialist networking, social media, press, open studios, web (K17)

Communicate with stakeholders, colleagues or customers. (S11)

Acts in a way that builds and maintains positive relationships with colleagues and others. (B3)

Acts in a professional and ethical manner, embracing equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace. (B6)

(Core) Sustainability
K20
S3 S13

The properties, environmental impact, and benefits of eco-friendly or recycled materials used in packing. (K20)

Identify sustainable techniques to make hand crafted items. (S3)

Select packaging for craft items to protect them whilst in transit. Present items as per the organisation’s or client or customer needs. (S13)

N/A

(Core) Making

S2
B4

N/A

Use technology as an enabler to make hand-crafted items, models or prototypes. (S2)

Takes ownership of work. (B4)

(ceramicist) Production
K22 K27 K32 K33
S14 S16 S19 S20 S21

Ceramic item manufacture key factors: use and function, size, shape, ergonomics, fitness for purpose, and production scale. (K22)

Ways that decorations can be applied to ceramic items such as: stamping, embossing, sprig work, brushwork, glaze, decals and sgraffito. (K27)

Design principles such as line, texture, size, shape, form, colour, volume, proportion. (K32)

Read drawings and interpret prototypes or models. (K33)

Make ceramic items, prototypes or models in line with the brief. Consider: purpose, end user, market, and budget. (S14)

Apply design principles to the making of ceramic items, in line with the brief including shape, size, proportion, colour and finish. (S16)

Select and use finishing techniques or glazes to be applied to the final ceramic product. (S19)

Assess the finished ceramic item against the brief and the production schedule including efficiency and wastage, quality, budget. (S20)

Use drawn plans (hand or digital), prototypes or models to aid the making of a hand-made ceramic product. (S21)

N/A

Observation with questions - Observation

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Tools
K8 K12
S1 S4 S6 S15

The types of hand and machine operated tools used by craft makers within your chosen craft. The crafts or materials they are typically used for. (K8)

Storage for tools, materials and products. (K12)

Select and use tools and equipment. (S1)

Store tools and materials, ensuring they are protected from damage when not in use. (S4)

Clean, maintain and prepare the craft workspace or workshop. (S6)

Use specialist tools and equipment required for specific purposes. (S15)

N/A

(Core) Health and safety
K21
S5
B1

Health and Safety; regulations: the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), the Health and Safety At Work Act (HASAWA), the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR), and manual handling as applicable to your craft activities. (K21)

Follow health and safety procedures. (S5)

Puts safety first. (B1)

(ceramicist) Making

S17 S18

N/A

Select and use clay or material for the ceramic item being made. (S17)

Use making skills for example hand building, sculpting, throwing, casting, moulding, and tool crafting or equivalent. (S18)

N/A

Contact us about this apprenticeship

Employers involved in creating the standard: Crafts Council, Heritage Crafts Association, Intitute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education, LADA/CC Skills, Savoir Beds Limited

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