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This apprenticeship standard has been approved for delivery by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. However, starts on the apprenticeship will only be possible once a suitable end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) has joined the Apprenticeship Provider and Assessment Register (APAR). Once the EPAO has joined the APAR, funding for apprentice starts will be permitted and this message will be removed.

This apprenticeship has been retired

Overview of the role

Assessing the health needs of individuals, families, workplaces and the wider community.

Details of standard

This standard has options. Display duties and KSBs for:

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in the public, independent and private sectors. Health visitors and school nurses are employed in the NHS, local authorities, community interest companies, social enterprises and schools. Occupational health nurses are employed by any type of employer in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to make sure work in partnership with people to prevent ill health, protect health and promote safety and wellbeing. Using a formidable evidence base they will lead, influence and collaborate with other agencies, organisations and professionals to improve and embed sustainable changes to the overall health, safety and wellbeing of people at home, within communities, in schools and in the workplace. SCPHNs play a key role in the safeguarding of those people who are most vulnerable in society, and are ambitious for the public health of the communities they serve. They actively pursue sustainable development goals that promote everyone’s right to a healthy life.

SCPHN health visitors (HV) are uniquely placed to reach every infant and child in their own home, and be connected to their whole family and community. They build trusting relationships with children, carers and families, to positively influence their future health outcomes. They identify their health needs and strengths and deliver timely, effective, evidence-based interventions in partnership with them. They provide a universal service that ensures support for infants, children and families is personalised, effective, timely and proportionate. The needs and the welfare of the infant and child are at all times central to their work. Health visitors use their professional autonomy to adapt and tailor their response to the health, safety and wellbeing needs of individuals, families and communities within diverse and changing contexts. They are sensitive to different cultural perspectives and use in-depth knowledge of local communities to develop strong community relationships and to connect families with the community resources that best meet their needs. Health visitors are advocates for fairness, equity and social justice and will challenge discriminatory practices and behaviours. They understand the impact of the wider determinants of health and are committed to addressing health inequalities through prevention and early intervention, and the promotion and improvement of health. They lead services that are person-centred and evidence driven, with creativity and resourcefulness, and evaluate the impact of their interventions to continuously improve the quality of care and outcomes for infants, children and families. They maximise the positive impact of health visiting services by working within a collaborative system, planning and coordinating care and maintaining continuity across different services and agencies. They embrace and champion new technologies and are skilled in leading changes in service delivery

SCPHN school nurses (SN) are autonomous practitioners who uphold the rights of school-aged children and young people at all times. Working collaboratively across health, education and other agencies, and as an integral part of a broader public health service, school nurses advocate for optimum health for all school-aged children and young people, seeking to ensure that services are fair, inclusive, equitable, anti-discriminatory and positively influence health and wellbeing. Using a variety of advanced communication skills, school nurses build mutually trusting relationships with school-aged children and young people, and parents, carers and families. Importantly, school nurses actively listen to school-aged children and young people, taking account of what matters to them and always putting the needs, welfare and safety of school-aged children and young people first. School nurses provide culturally appropriate support and early interventions which aim to promote positive choices and reduce risk-taking behaviours. They focus on and support the holistic needs of school-aged children and young people. They understand the wider determinants of health and are committed to addressing health inequalities across the life course, through health education, health promotion and evidence-based age and maturity appropriate interventions. They know their community and its assets and lead services that are person-centred and evidence driven to ensure positive health outcomes for school-aged children and young people. They collaborate and work effectively with teams and other professionals across a range of sectors and agencies.

SCPHN occupational health nurses (OHN) lead and work in a range of work environments and sectors. They lead services to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of people in their workplaces and beyond. Working autonomously, they promote and protect the health of the workforce, ensuring a healthy balance between work and wellbeing. As a distinct group of public health professionals, they help to prevent work-related ill health and disease by advising on the creation of workplaces that are safe, efficient and inclusive. Occupational health nurses collaborate with other professionals, sector experts, employers and employees to lead workplace health initiatives that are responsive to the needs of individuals and organisations. They are able to use and analyse data effectively combining their specialist nursing skills with broader understanding and experience of the distinct sector they work in to embed health initiatives in the wider organisational planning for the benefit of people and communities and in addressing inequalities. Applying their professional judgement and business acumen, occupational health nurses create innovative strategies for inclusive workplaces that enable people of varied abilities to be productively employed. They champion the need for workplace health, safety and wellbeing strategies that recognise the impact of health on work and the value of work to health. Recognising the value of a diverse working population, occupational health nurses embed person-centred approaches to health that address the needs of a varied workforce. They are change agents who influence at strategic and sector level, thinking globally but acting locally, to create a healthy workforce for the present and the future.

SCPHN public health nurses (PHN) are specialists in public health who do not have a predetermined field of SCPHN practice. They may work in roles across a wide range of sectors and settings, applying their specialist public health knowledge and skills to the people, communities and populations they serve. They take a life course and whole population approach to make a valuable contribution to the wider society’s health, safety and wellbeing and in addressing health inequalities. They advocate for people fostering therapeutic relationships that build confidence and trust. They may provide public health information, support and provide timely interventions to people. Equally they may offer public health advice and support to voluntary or third sector organisations within the wider community. They proactively collaborate with interdisciplinary and inter-agency teams and services to ensure that people who require wider public health support, care and interventions have fair and equitable access to public health resources, that promote their health, safety and wellbeing, prevent ill health and protect those who are vulnerable.

Typical job titles include:

Health visitor Occupational health nurse School nurse Specialist community public health nurse

Entry requirements

It is a requirement of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) that those training to become a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse are already registered nurses on Part 1 of the NMC register or registered midwives.

Core occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Undertake autonomous specialist community public health nursing practice.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5

Duty 2 Transform specialist community public health nursing practice through evidence, research, evaluation and translation.

K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16

S12 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S20 S22

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5

Option duties


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: The links between global and national socio-economic and political strategies and policies and public health. Back to Duty

K2: The relevant legal, regulatory and governance requirements, policies and ethical frameworks to the specialist community public health practice, differentiating between the devolved legislatures of the UK. Back to Duty

K3: Legislation, guidance and advice regarding sustainable development goals, including environmental factors and other pollutants that affect the health and wellbeing of people now and in the future. Back to Duty

K4: How to make professional judgements and decisions, and work in complex, unfamiliar and unpredictable environments. Back to Duty

K5: Stigma and the potential for bias. Back to Duty

K6: The need for reasonable adjustments for people, groups and communities, influencing public health policy change and best practice. Back to Duty

K7: The advanced numeracy, literacy, digital and technological skills required to meet the needs of people, communities and the wider population, to ensure safe and effective specialist public health nursing practice. Back to Duty

K8: The impact and benefits of local and national health and other policies on the health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K9: How to identify, evaluate and proficiently use multiple sources of evidence and research relevant to people, communities and populations to inform specialist community public health nursing practice. Back to Duty

K10: The research, evidence and policy that impact on public health nursing practice. Back to Duty

K11: Data reliability, statistics and informatics. Back to Duty

K12: How to identity whether data and information available is sufficient to inform public health priorities and national intervention strategies and how to refine data sets or recognise the need for further study. Back to Duty

K13: How to critically appraise epidemiological research. Back to Duty

K14: The evidence base theory and principles of public health and nursing practice and how it supports innovative approaches to influence people’s motivation, choices and behaviours. Back to Duty

K15: How to critically appraise the evidence that informs new innovations in public health programmes, including genomics, and evaluate early success measures and impact on population health outcomes. Back to Duty

K16: How to share outcomes and lessons learned from audit, research and evaluation in specialist public health nursing practice locally and nationally and across sectors through professional and peer reviewed processes. Back to Duty

K17: The factors that may lead to inequalities in health outcomes and health inequity. Back to Duty

K18: The importance of compassionate leadership in applying human rights, equality, diversity and inclusion, to improve the health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K19: The legal, ethical, moral and spiritual needs and challenges that may be faced when promoting population health. Back to Duty

K20: How complexity and comorbidity impact on people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K21: The opportunities individuals have to educate themselves on the risks to themselves and others of the abuse of tobacco, alcohol and other substances and potentially addictive behaviours. Back to Duty

K22: How to conduct, interpret and evaluate health assessment and screening, surveillance and profiling checks and interventions, and immunisation and vaccination programmes for people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K23: The importance of equitable and accessible services for all through improved health literacy communication and networking. Back to Duty

K24: The importance of consulting with, listening to and supporting people, communities and populations when assessing, planning and co-producing public health interventions. Back to Duty

K25: Models, evidence and concepts to plan, conduct and evaluate population level interventions to address specific public health issues. Back to Duty

K26: The determinants of health in order to develop culturally responsive and inclusive public health interventions with people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K27: How to lead on identifying vulnerable people, families, communities and populations and the action that can be taken to support, safeguard and protect them. Back to Duty

K28: The determinants of health, intergenerational cycles of deprivation and health inequalities that affect the mental, physical, cognitive, behavioural, social, and spiritual health and wellbeing of children, parents, carers and families. Back to Duty

K29: Healthy development and wellbeing of infants and children. Back to Duty

K30: The mental health of parents, families, infants and children during the perinatal period and the early identification of perinatal mental ill health. Back to Duty

K31: Infant mental health and infant distress. Back to Duty

K32: Person-centred interventions that promote healthy relationships and minimise risks of domestic violence, child maltreatment and other forms of abuse within the family. Back to Duty

K33: The developmental impact of parental conflict on children. Back to Duty

K34: Signs of abuse and neglect across the life course. Back to Duty

K35: Trends in global and national strategies and programmes for preventative interventions and promotion of health. Back to Duty

K36: How to apply genomics into their SCPHN practice to support prevention and early intervention in the health of the population across the life course. Back to Duty

K37: The importance of community assets and resources to support positive health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K38: How to empower people, communities and populations to connect effectively with local initiatives, support networks, community assets, programmes and resources that support their health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

K39: Social prescribing to support individual, community and population health outcomes. Back to Duty

K40: Behavioural, psychological and social sciences and how these can be applied to people across the life course, and to communities and populations, to enhance collaborative, strength-based therapeutic relationships. Back to Duty

K41: The importance of medicines management with respect to administration, optimisation and reconciliation, and the positive impact of correct medicines management on people’s current and future health outcome. Back to Duty

K42: How to assess the health status and health literacy of populations across the life course and their related determinants of health. Back to Duty

K43: How to use culturally appropriate, evidence-based approaches to assess, support and monitor the health and wellbeing of people, and when to refer to specialist services. Back to Duty

K44: The importance of populations, places, communities and determinants of health to inform key areas of specialist public health practice. Back to Duty

K45: How to lead on and contribute to policy and reporting into environmental, social-structural factors, and individual behaviours that impact on the health of people across the life course. Back to Duty

K46: How to use data and observation to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of services that seek to improve health outcomes of their intended users and identify trends or a need for improvement. Back to Duty

K47: Infant and child anatomy, physiology, genetics, genomics and development. Back to Duty

K48: Holistic health assessments and programmed health and development reviews, working in partnership with parents and families. Back to Duty

K49: Early signs of atypical patterns of development, or significant anomalies that may result in disability or emotional, physical or developmental health needs or risks. Back to Duty

K50: Advanced level communication and interpersonal skills to establish trusting relationships which are respectful of families’ capabilities, priorities and values. Back to Duty

K51: The importance of working in partnership with families to continually assess, and appraise the impact of known strengths, changing circumstances and relationships on child and family health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

K52: Early emotional development, theories and models of attachment and the impacts of positive and enduring parental-child relationships. Back to Duty

K53: The effects of trauma on child development and how they adjust to those effects. Back to Duty

K54: The anatomy, neurodevelopment, physiology and epigenetics relevant to infant nutrition, including the implications of infant feeding, weaning and early food behaviour for optimum child and maternal health, child physical and socioemotional development and future behaviour patterns. Back to Duty

K55: Risks to healthy weight in childhood. Back to Duty

K56: The benefits of children learning life skills in the home environment. Back to Duty

K57: How to support parents and families who receive a life changing or life limiting diagnosis during pregnancy and in the early years, and how to use a strength based and empowering approach to respond to their needs, which may be complex. Back to Duty

K58: The range of appropriate and effective resources available to support children, parents and families with additional needs due to mental and/or physical ill health, learning disabilities or physical disability, and/or those living with multiple, complex, long term conditions. Back to Duty

K59: Opportunities for local grants, financial support and other local community assets and services available to support children, parents and families. Back to Duty

K60: How to advise parents, carers and families on symptom identification and relief, enabling them to manage minor illnesses and injuries safely and effectively, and in knowing when to seek support for further treatment where necessary. Back to Duty

K61: Child, adolescent and adult sexual and reproductive health and contraception. Back to Duty

K62: The support available to bereaved parents, children and families in the event of miscarriage, stillbirth or parental death. Back to Duty

K63: Strategies and initiatives that improve home, community and workplace cultures and environments to enhance the health and wellbeing of people and communities in the places they live, learn and work. Back to Duty

K64: New and assistive technologies that support and influence people’s choices for their own health and wellbeing, and assist with access to services. Back to Duty

K65: How to develop and present business cases to create investment for change and value for money. Back to Duty

K66: The importance of leading and supporting a culture of learning and continuous professional development for colleagues, and with interdisciplinary and interagency teams. Back to Duty

K67: Individual abilities and learning needs when applying the standards of education and training for pre- and post-registration nursing, midwifery and nursing associate students, in order to educate, supervise and assess effectively. Back to Duty

K68: How to identify sustainable development goals, the risks to the environment and the impact on the health and wellbeing of people. Back to Duty

K69: The importance of sharing information regarding communicable diseases and approaches necessary for communicable disease surveillance, infection prevention and control, including immunisation and vaccination programmes. Back to Duty

K70: How to assess and manage major incidents and outbreaks including contamination and communicable disease across local or wider boundaries. Back to Duty

K71: How to identify, critically analyse and manage new and enduring hazards and risks to health at local, national and global levels. Back to Duty

K72: How to plan for emergencies and pandemic threats to population health taking account of the direct and wider risk, impacts and hierarchy of controls on health and wellbeing and service provision. Back to Duty

K73: Child safety, risk behaviours and the differentials of risk in relation to the child’s age, stage of development and home environment. Back to Duty

K74: The parents’ and carers’ need for autonomy and control and the wide range of attitudes, values, beliefs, expectations, faiths, cultures and approaches to parenting. Back to Duty

K75: How to assess community health needs and assets, through community profiling and how to synthesise and apply data and information using informatics, and other techniques. Back to Duty

K76: The importance of sustainable and innovative health visiting strategies that contribute to place-based complex interventions and improve public health outcomes for children and families. Back to Duty

K77: The importance of leading public health services that promote and improve the health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K78: How to assess service requirements. Back to Duty

K79: How to monitor and report on the outcomes of strategy and policy implementation and make recommendations for improvement including changes to commissioning. Back to Duty

K80: How to triangulate information obtained from audit, continuous improvement activity, governance, risk management and performance monitoring to evaluate the efficacy of service provision. Back to Duty

K81: How a culture of critical reflection and continuous professional development promotes team and interdisciplinary learning. Back to Duty

K82: The importance of alliances and partnerships that support equality, diversity and inclusion, collaboration and sharing of new ideas and innovations. Back to Duty

K83: Advanced communication skills, including the use of digital and other modalities support communication in virtual and remote environments. Back to Duty

K84: Techniques that can be used to influence, challenge, and persuade peers and senior stakeholders in relation to public health strategies and policies that affect people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

K85: Flexible approaches to child health promotion programmes that enable co-design and collective decision making. Back to Duty

K86: How to collaborate on development of services for children with high impact health and care. Back to Duty

K87: The importance of involving, escalating, reporting and making decisions with interdisciplinary and interagency teams on the immediate and continuing risk of domestic violence, child maltreatment and other forms of abuse to the safety of infants, children and families and collaborating on actions. Back to Duty

K88: The importance of consistency and continuity of care for infants, parents and carers, and a smooth transition between midwifery and health visiting services during the antenatal period and first days of the infant’s life. Back to Duty

K89: The relationship between school, life, mental and physical health and ill health. Back to Duty

K90: Interventions that are holistic, inclusive and responsive to the needs of school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K91: The impact of intergenerational cycles of dependency and adversity on school-aged children and young people, and how protective factors, early help, and interventions improve health outcomes. Back to Duty

K92: How to identify vulnerability and inequality within the school-aged population, and identify those needing support and those at risk. Back to Duty

K93: How to safeguard and prioritise support for school-aged children and young people most at risk, and escalate concerns. Back to Duty

K94: How to provide specialist expertise for safeguarding and child protection pathways. Back to Duty

K95: The challenges and potential conflicts that may arise when applying safeguarding and child protection pathways to individual school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K96: How to assess the risk for vulnerability in school-aged children and young people and families that are impacted by changes to their circumstances. Back to Duty

K97: The potential impact of stigma, bias and assumptions that people may make about school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K98: The validated tools that can be used to deliver holistic health assessments and programmed development reviews that aim to improve individual, community and population health outcomes. Back to Duty

K99: The biopsychosocial, moral and spiritual development of school-aged children and young people at all key phases in the life course. Back to Duty

K100: How age and biopsychosocial development influence communication skills in the school-aged population. Back to Duty

K101: How biopsychosocial influences in adolescent years impact on behaviour, life skills and transition to adulthood and recognise adolescence as a distinct stage of the life course. Back to Duty

K102: The impact of key transition periods and events for school-aged children and young people including starting and leaving school, change of care provider, illness and bereavement. Back to Duty

K103: The range of evidence-based interventions that support young people’s safe transition to adulthood. Back to Duty

K104: How to optimise positive behaviours in parents, carers, families and peers and, the evidence-based interventions that can promote trust and self-efficacy to improve health and wellbeing for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K105: The opportunities for local grants, financial support and other local community assets and services. Back to Duty

K106: The action to take to prevent and minimise the risk of adverse childhood experiences and how to use protective factors to support and guide school-aged children and young people, parents and carers. Back to Duty

K107: School aged children and young people’s emotional literacy, cognitive ability, wellbeing and resilience skills. Back to Duty

K108: Early signs of low mood and anxiety in school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K109: How evidence-based interventions help school aged children and young people consider the impacts of and risks associated with specific behaviour choices related to social media, alcohol/substances, violence, exploitation and gang culture. Back to Duty

K110: The effects of trauma on children and young people’s development and adjustment and how to use culturally appropriate, evidence-based, trauma-informed approaches to assess, support and monitor. Back to Duty

K111: The ways community and population profiling can be used to identify and assess health and wellbeing needs and priorities for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K112: How collaborative cultural and community developments can improve health and wellbeing in the school-aged population. Back to Duty

K113: Local health education, health promotion and safety campaigns aligned to key public health priorities for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K114: The impact of the school environment, its culture and relationships on school-aged children and young people and the effect on their health, wellbeing and achievement. Back to Duty

K115: The impact of socio-economic disadvantage including digital poverty. Back to Duty

K116: Lived experiences which may impact on school aged children and young people’s behaviour, health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

K117: The parents’ and carers’ need for autonomy and control and the wide range of attitudes, values, beliefs, expectations, faiths, cultures and approaches to parenting. Back to Duty

K118: The data, information and intelligence related to home, school and community environments and how this intelligence can be widely reported to positively influence policy and strategy to improve health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

K119: Services available support for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K120: How to advocate for school-aged children and young people in public health services, and ensure their voice is heard to ensure co-production, co-design and development at universal, targeted and specialist service levels. Back to Duty

K121: Regional and national public health initiatives to protect and promote the health and wellbeing of school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

K122: How the lived experience and lived existence of school-aged children and young people and other sources of evidence can influence and inform current and future specialist practice, policy decisions and school nursing service design. Back to Duty

K123: The need to promote visibility of school nursing services and ensure accessibility through engagement with school aged children and young people, parents, carers, families, school staff, other professionals and voluntary sector organisations. Back to Duty

K124: The design school nursing services which recognise and respect children and young people’s privacy and dignity. Back to Duty

K125: The opportunities, benefits and risks for school nursing services when communicating with school-aged children and young people face to face and via social media and virtual platforms. Back to Duty

K126: The impact of socio-economic and political issues on work and health. Back to Duty

K127: The relationship between worklessness and health and their association with health inequalities that affect people, families and communities. Back to Duty

K128: The relationship between work, life, mental and physical health and ill health. Back to Duty

K129: The individuals who may be vulnerable or at risk of direct and indirect abuse or harm within or outside the workplace. Back to Duty

K130: Emerging health issues, and support available for individuals to access for health and care services and other agencies that balance individual health and wellbeing with employment obligations. Back to Duty

K131: Evidence of the impact and value of occupational health services for employees, organisations and the wider population. Back to Duty

K132: Health and safety legislation and case law. Back to Duty

K133: The principles of occupational hygiene, engineering controls and ergonomics to advise on the creation and maintenance of healthy work environments. Back to Duty

K134: How disease, illness and impairment act as barriers to gaining, sustaining and returning to work and the impact of this on people and all areas of life. Back to Duty

K135: How inclusive strategies enable innovative, person-centred approaches for employees who may need adaptations and adjustments to their work due to health and wellbeing reasons. Back to Duty

K136: How to develop strategies to support and enable employees with multiple or long-term conditions to have sustainable, productive and fulfilling work. Back to Duty

K137: The work adjustments available to employees and employers which consider the impact of diagnoses, therapies, interventions, medications and treatments. Back to Duty

K138: Organisational disaster planning and preparedness to support business continuity and optimise the ongoing safety and health of people. Back to Duty

K139: How to develop sustainable, data-driven occupational health strategies embedded as part of the business improvement cycle. Back to Duty

K140: The use of inclusion and innovation in job design to lead, improve and innovate ways to address health hazards by elimination, mitigation and control. Back to Duty

K141: Safe, appropriate and economically viable approaches to waste management for food, hazardous chemicals, biological and clinical waste, that take into consideration infection control measures and the impact of environmental pollution on health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

K142: The importance of the environmental impact of work processes and products. Back to Duty

K143: The hierarchy of control used to manage risks to health, safety and wellbeing in the workplace. Back to Duty

K144: The impact of new and emerging technology on workability now and in the future. Back to Duty

K145: The workplace adjustments that enable wider participation of people in work, and how to effectively use assistive technologies. Back to Duty

K146: The impact of job redesign, the need for skills development and/or redeployment on the health and wellbeing of people. Back to Duty

K147: The effect of worklessness on the health and wellbeing of people, families and communities. Back to Duty

K148: Assistive technologies and their potentially varied impact on individual people’s work and health. Back to Duty

K149: How to use organisational and workforce profiling data to secure resources for the development and delivery of occupational and employee health, safety and wellbeing. Back to Duty

K150: Systems that allow data collection, information retrieval and dissemination protocols for enhancing occupational health nursing practice. Back to Duty

K151: National and international public health agendas and strategies. Back to Duty

K152: Types of information that can be used to quantify and qualify the positive impact of occupational health interventions on workplace and business targets and outcomes. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Practice with a high level of autonomy, entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialist community public health nurse. Back to Duty

S2: Be an effective ambassador, role model and compassionate leader, and a positive influence on the profession. Back to Duty

S3: Drive and influence their own field of SCPHN practice. Back to Duty

S4: Select and apply relevant legal, regulatory and governance requirements, policies and ethical frameworks to their specialist community public health practice, differentiating between the devolved legislatures of the UK. Back to Duty

S5: Lead on the application of legislation, guidance and advice regarding sustainable development goals, including environmental factors and other pollutants that affect the health and wellbeing of people now and in the future. Back to Duty

S6: Influence and promote health as a fundamental human right and as a shared value through engagement, inclusion and participation. Back to Duty

S7: Make professional judgements and decisions, and work in complex, unfamiliar and unpredictable environments, proactively identifying actions and solutions to problems that may have many interacting factors. Back to Duty

S8: Lead and promote public health provision that is person-centred, anti-discriminatory, culturally competent and inclusive. Back to Duty

S9: Demonstrate critical awareness of stigma and the potential for bias, taking action where necessary to educate others and resolve issues arising from both. Back to Duty

S10: Recognise the need for and lead on action to provide reasonable adjustments for people, groups and communities, influencing public health policy change and best practice. Back to Duty

S11: Demonstrate the advanced numeracy, literacy, digital and technological skills required to meet the needs of people, communities and the wider population, to ensure safe and effective specialist public health nursing practice. Back to Duty

S12: Assess the impact and benefits of local and national health and other policies on the health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S13: Identify, evaluate and proficiently use multiple sources of evidence and research relevant to people, communities and populations to inform specialist community public health nursing practice. Back to Duty

S14: Identify gaps in research, evidence and policy that impact on public health nursing practice and influence how to address these. Back to Duty

S15: Utilise and effectively participate in new areas of research across interdisciplinary and interagency teams related to public health priorities and interventions. Back to Duty

S16: Use reliable data, statistics and informatics to lead on and support policies and programmes that improve the health outcomes of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S17: Identify where insufficient information and data is available to inform public health priorities and national intervention strategies and how this may be addressed by refining data sets or in recognising the need for further study. Back to Duty

S18: Critically appraise epidemiological research and demonstrate its use in evidence-based specialist public health nursing practice. Back to Duty

S19: Synthesise and apply knowledge from research, evaluation, audit and global innovation that leads to improvements in the health of people, communities and populations and addresses health inequalities. Back to Duty

S20: Apply the evidence base theory and principles of public health and nursing practice to support innovative approaches to influence people’s motivation, choices and behaviours. Back to Duty

S21: Critically appraise the evidence that informs new innovations in public health programmes, including genomics, and evaluate early success measures and impact on population health outcomes. Back to Duty

S22: Share outcomes and lessons learned from audit, research and evaluation in specialist public health nursing practice locally and nationally and across sectors through professional and peer reviewed processes. Back to Duty

S23: Critically analyse the factors that may lead to inequalities in health outcomes and health inequity and take appropriate action to mitigate their impact on people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S24: Demonstrate compassionate leadership in applying human rights, equality, diversity and inclusion, to improve the health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S25: Appreciate the legal, ethical, moral and spiritual needs and challenges that may be faced when promoting population health, helping to mitigate barriers that enable people and families to live to their full potential. Back to Duty

S26: Assess the impact of complexity and comorbidity and their impact on people, communities and populations, in order to share knowledge and lead on person-centred public health approaches. Back to Duty

S27: Develop, promote and support opportunities to educate individuals on the risks to themselves and others of the abuse of tobacco, alcohol and other substances and potentially addictive behaviours. Back to Duty

S28: Conduct, interpret and evaluate health assessment and screening, surveillance and profiling checks and interventions, and immunisation and vaccination programmes for people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S29: Ensure equitable and accessible services for all through improved health literacy communication and networking. Back to Duty

S30: Consult with, listen to and support people, communities and populations when assessing, planning and co-producing public health interventions. Back to Duty

S31: Use models, evidence and concepts to plan, conduct and evaluate population level interventions to address specific public health issues. Back to Duty

S32: Apply understanding of determinants of health to develop culturally responsive and inclusive public health interventions with people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S33: Lead on identifying vulnerable people, families, communities and populations and take action to support, safeguard and protect them, and coordinate timely care and other responsive support when needed. Back to Duty

S34: Critically analyse and apply evidence-based knowledge of the determinants of health, intergenerational cycles of deprivation and health inequalities that affect the mental, physical, cognitive, behavioural, social, and spiritual health and wellbeing of children, parents, carers and families. Back to Duty

S35: Provide support to parents, carers and families in understanding what is needed to secure healthy development and wellbeing of infants and children. Back to Duty

S36: Continually assess and skilfully adapt to different environments and complex situations in order to identify and advocate for those families most at risk, while at all times safeguarding the welfare of the child and others at risk. Back to Duty

S37: Play a significant role in promoting mental health for parents, families, infants and children during the perinatal period and in the assessment and early identification of perinatal mental ill health. Back to Duty

S38: Provide care and support to infants, children, parents and families where appropriate and facilitate access to specialist mental health services according to the level of need. Back to Duty

S39: Promote infant mental health and early identification of infant distress, providing support to families to enable them to prioritise and respond to their infant’s needs. Back to Duty

S40: Initiate appropriate evidence-based person-centred interventions to promote healthy relationships and minimise risks of domestic violence, child maltreatment and other forms of abuse within the family and the developmental impact of parental conflict on children. Back to Duty

S41: Use professional judgement to observe, recognise and respond to signs of abuse and neglect across the life course, recognising that individual safeguarding needs will differ. Back to Duty

S42: Recognise, critically evaluate and monitor trends in global and national strategies and programmes for preventative interventions and promotion of health to inform specialist public health practice locally, nationally and globally. Back to Duty

S43: Recognise and accommodate any future developments in the application of genomics into their SCPHN practice to support prevention and early intervention in the health of the population across the life course. Back to Duty

S44: Appreciate and use community assets and resources to support positive health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S45: In partnership with people, adopt a life course approach when assessing the public health needs of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S46: Empower people, communities and populations to connect effectively with local initiatives, support networks, community assets, programmes and resources that support their health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

S47: Use social prescribing to support individual, community and population health outcomes. Back to Duty

S48: Enhance collaborative, strength-based therapeutic relationships. Back to Duty

S49: Appreciate the importance of medicines management with respect to administration, optimisation and reconciliation, and the positive impact of correct medicines management on people’s current and future health outcome. Back to Duty

S50: Assess the health status and health literacy of populations across the life course and their related determinants of health. Back to Duty

S51: Use culturally appropriate, evidence-based approaches to assess, support and monitor the health and wellbeing of people, and appropriately refer to specialist services if necessary. Back to Duty

S52: Critically apply knowledge of populations, places, communities and determinants of health to inform key areas of specialist public health practice. Back to Duty

S53: In partnership with communities, develop and implement plans for local communities and populations to positively affect public health outcomes. Back to Duty

S54: Lead on and contribute to policy and reporting into environmental, social-structural factors, and individual behaviours that impact on the health of people across the life course. Back to Duty

S55: Use data and observation to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of services that seek to improve health outcomes of their intended users, and be able to identify trends or a need for improvement. Back to Duty

S56: Undertake programmed health assessment and development reviews. Back to Duty

S57: Use validated tools to deliver holistic health assessments and programmed health and development reviews, working in partnership with parents and families to promote health and identify emergent and existing concerns including vulnerability and inequality, and facilitate and prioritise support and/or early intervention for the child and family as appropriate. Back to Duty

S58: Assess for early signs of atypical patterns of development, or significant anomalies that may result in disability or emotional, physical or developmental health needs or risks, and deliver evidence-based anticipatory guidance or targeted intervention tailored to individual and family circumstances and needs. Back to Duty

S59: Apply advanced level communication and interpersonal skills to establish trusting relationships which are respectful of families’ capabilities, priorities and values. Back to Duty

S60: Work in partnership with families to continually assess, and appraise the impact of known strengths, changing circumstances and relationships on child and family health and wellbeing and adapt support accordingly, acknowledging the needs of the family as a whole and prioritising support on the basis of immediate and continuing risk and need. Back to Duty

S61: Work in partnership with families to promote, educate and support sensitive, responsive relationships between parents and their children through the application of specialist knowledge of early emotional development, theories and models of attachment and the impacts of positive and enduring parental-child relationships. Back to Duty

S62: Evaluate the effects of trauma on child development and how they adjust to those effects, and work in partnership with children and families who are affected by trauma to strengthen their resilience. Back to Duty

S63: Critically apply specialist knowledge of the anatomy, neurodevelopment, physiology and epigenetics relevant to infant nutrition, including the implications of infant feeding, weaning and early food behaviour for optimum child and maternal health, child physical and socioemotional development and future behaviour patterns. Back to Duty

S64: Using a strength-based approach support children and families to identify risks to healthy weight in childhood promoting family nutrition and supporting them to make optimum and available choices, referring to other services according to need and risk. Back to Duty

S65: Work in partnership with families to support positive, nurturing child and family relationships, and in promoting the benefits for children learning life skills in the home environment. Back to Duty

S66: Support parents and families who receive a life changing or life limiting diagnosis during pregnancy and in the early years, and in partnership with them use a strength based and empowering approach to respond to their needs, which may be complex. Back to Duty

S67: Facilitate access to a range of appropriate and effective available resources to support children, parents and families with additional needs due to mental and/or physical ill health, learning disabilities or physical disability, and/or those living with multiple, complex, long term conditions. Back to Duty

S68: Support children, parents and families to develop motivation and self-advocacy when raising awareness of opportunities for local grants, financial support and other local community assets and services. Back to Duty

S69: Advise parents, carers and families on symptom identification and relief, enabling them to manage minor illnesses and injuries safely and effectively, and in knowing when to seek support for further treatment where necessary. Back to Duty

S70: Provide evidence-based support and advice on child, adolescent and adult sexual and reproductive health and contraception. Back to Duty

S71: Provide, evidence-based support to bereaved parents, children and families in the event of miscarriage, stillbirth or parental death and refer to additional support as appropriate. Back to Duty

S72: Critically appraise and apply strategies and initiatives that improve home, community and workplace cultures and environments to enhance the health and wellbeing of people and communities in the places they live, learn and work. Back to Duty

S73: Critically appraise the use of new and assistive technologies that support and influence people’s choices for their own health and wellbeing, and assist with access to services. Back to Duty

S74: Demonstrate professional business and financial acumen when developing and presenting business cases to create investment for change and value for money. Back to Duty

S75: Tailor nationwide programmes or commission new services that promote healthy cultures, environments and behaviours for local implementation and evaluate their effectiveness. Back to Duty

S76: Lead and support a culture of learning and continuous professional development for colleagues, and with interdisciplinary and interagency teams. Back to Duty

S77: Recognise individual abilities and learning needs when applying the standards of education and training for pre and post-registration nursing, midwifery and nursing associate students, in order to educate, supervise and assess effectively. Back to Duty

S78: Promote and lead effective public health workplace cultures that benefit people, communities, and populations. Back to Duty

S79: Advance public health through identifying sustainable development goals and prepare to take action on risks to the environment and its impact on the health and wellbeing of people. Back to Duty

S80: Share information regarding communicable diseases and approaches necessary for communicable disease surveillance, infection prevention and control, including immunisation and vaccination programmes. Back to Duty

S81: Plan for emergencies and pandemic threats to population health taking account of the direct and wider risk, impacts and hierarchy of controls on health and wellbeing and service provision. Back to Duty

S82: Work in partnership with parents and carers to promote child safety, reduce risk behaviours and enhance awareness of the differentials of risk in relation to the child’s age, stage of development and home environment. Back to Duty

S83: Respect parents’ and carers’ need for autonomy and control with sensitivity to a wide range of attitudes, values, beliefs, expectations, faiths, cultures and approaches to parenting, using a transparent approach whilst simultaneously safeguarding the welfare of the children at all times. Back to Duty

S84: Demonstrate sensitivity and respect for privacy in assessing whether the child or family’s home situation and environment is appropriate for facilitating and encouraging open discussion and disclosure of personal issues. Back to Duty

S85: Evaluate community health needs and assets, and advance practice through community profiling, the synthesis and application of data and information, use of informatics, and other techniques. Back to Duty

S86: Develop sustainable and innovative health visiting strategies that contribute to place-based complex interventions and improve public health outcomes for children and families, reporting outcomes and areas for improvement in line with local and national governance and audit requirements. Back to Duty

S87: Lead public health services that promote and improve the health and wellbeing of people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S88: Lead teams that are effective in delivering public health services, both on their own and in collaboration with others. Back to Duty

S89: Assess service requirements influencing and leading on policy development and strategic planning to address population health needs incorporating approaches for prevention and risk management. Back to Duty

S90: Monitor and report on the outcomes of strategy and policy implementation and make recommendations for improvement including changes to commissioning. Back to Duty

S91: Evaluate the efficacy of service provision by triangulating information obtained from audit, continuous improvement activity, governance, risk management and performance monitoring. Back to Duty

S92: Compassionately lead and support a culture of critical reflection and continuous professional development that promotes team and interdisciplinary learning. Back to Duty

S93: Build alliances and partnerships that support equality, diversity and inclusion, collaboration and sharing of new ideas and innovations and be able to agree shared goals and priorities. Back to Duty

S94: Use a range of advanced communication skills with people, communities, peers and interdisciplinary and interagency colleagues, including use of digital and other modalities to support communication in virtual and remote environments. Back to Duty

S95: Communicate simple and complex public health information in a variety of formats, tailored for different community and population audiences. Back to Duty

S96: Use a range of techniques to influence, challenge, and persuade peers and senior stakeholders in relation to public health strategies and policies that affect people, communities and populations. Back to Duty

S97: Lead creative, flexible approaches to engage parents and carers in child health promotion programmes, providing advice and support to enable co-design and collective decision making. Back to Duty

S98: Lead discussions and collaborate on the development of services for children with high impact health and care needs and ensure workforce readiness for implementation. Back to Duty

S99: Involve, escalate, report and make decisions with interdisciplinary and interagency teams on the immediate and continuing risk of domestic violence, child maltreatment and other forms of abuse to the safety of infants, children and families and collaborate on all necessary actions. Back to Duty

S100: Lead interdisciplinary and interagency discussions and make decisions regarding the referral, transfer, support and management of children and families where there are complex mental or physical health needs and/or concerns. Back to Duty

S101: Work in partnership with midwives and other interdisciplinary and interagency teams and services during the antenatal period and first days of the infant’s life to ensure consistency and continuity of care for infants, parents and carers, and a smooth transition between midwifery and health visiting services. Back to Duty

S102: Work in partnership with school nurses to ensure the transition of support for the child and family from the health visitor to the school nursing service is positive, seamless and effective. Back to Duty

S103: Proactively promote, support and improve the health and wellbeing of school-aged children and young people, recognising the rights of the child at all times. Back to Duty

S104: Evaluate the relationship between school, life, mental and physical health and ill health and lead on proactive approaches to promote and protect health and wellbeing of school-aged children and young people in and outside of school. Back to Duty

S105: Lead evidence-based interventions that are holistic, inclusive and responsive to the needs of school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S106: Evaluate the impact of intergenerational cycles of dependency and adversity on school-aged children and young people, and how protective factors, early help, and interventions improve health outcomes. Back to Duty

S107: Apply an evidence-based approach to identify vulnerability and inequality within the school-aged population, identifying those needing support and those at risk. Back to Duty

S108: Safeguard and prioritise support for school-aged children and young people most at risk, escalating concerns and provide specialist expertise for safeguarding and child protection pathways. Back to Duty

S109: Safely manage challenges and potential conflicts when applying safeguarding and child protection pathways to individual school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S110: Assess the risk for vulnerability in school-aged children and young people and families that are impacted by changes to their circumstances, to maximise access and support from relevant services. Back to Duty

S111: Foster positive relationships and facilitate inclusion, recognising the potential impact of stigma, bias and assumptions that people may make about school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S112: Use of validated tools to deliver holistic health assessments and programmed development reviews that aim to improve individual, community and population health outcomes. Back to Duty

S113: Critically analyse and apply specialist knowledge of the biopsychosocial, moral and spiritual development of school-aged children and young people at all key phases in the life course. Back to Duty

S114: Evaluate how age and biopsychosocial development influence communication skills in the school-aged population, using advanced communication techniques to facilitate positive, trusting relationships with school aged children and young people, parents, carers and families. Back to Duty

S115: Evaluate how biopsychosocial influences in adolescent years impact on behaviour, life skills and transition to adulthood, recognising adolescence as a distinct stage of the life course. Back to Duty

S116: Assess the impact of key transition periods and events for school-aged children and young people including starting and leaving school, change of care provider, illness and bereavement, and apply appropriate intervention to support their development of self-managing behaviours. Back to Duty

S117: Use a range of evidence-based interventions to support young people’s safe transition to adulthood. Back to Duty

S118: Optimise positive behaviours in parents, carers, families and peers and, through evidence-based interventions, promote trust and self-efficacy to improve health and wellbeing for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S119: Support school-aged children and young people, parents and families to develop motivation and self-advocacy when raising awareness of opportunities for local grants, financial support and other local community assets and services. Back to Duty

S120: Use evidence-based observations, assessment and apply professional judgement when taking action to prevent and minimise the risk of adverse childhood experiences and build on protective factors to support and guide school-aged children and young people, parents and carers. Back to Duty

S121: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of school aged children and young people’s emotional literacy, cognitive ability, wellbeing and resilience skills when observing, assessing and making decisions on the appropriate intervention. Back to Duty

S122: Use professional judgement to assess for early signs of low mood and anxiety in school-aged children and young people, and provide early interventions to support emotional and mental health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

S123: Evaluate how evidence-based interventions help school aged children and young people consider the impacts of and risks associated with specific behaviour choices related to social media, alcohol/substances, violence, exploitation and gang culture. Back to Duty

S124: Evaluate the effects of trauma on children and young people’s development and adjustment and use culturally appropriate, evidence-based, trauma-informed approaches to assess, support and monitor, using professional judgement when making decisions to refer to specialist services. Back to Duty

S125: Use community and population profiling to identify and assess health and wellbeing needs and priorities for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S126: Lead, support and advocate for collaborative cultural and community developments that improve health and wellbeing in the school-aged population. Back to Duty

S127: Lead, co-design, provide and evaluate local health education, health promotion and safety campaigns aligned to key public health priorities for school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S128: Recognise the impact of the school environment, its culture and relationships that school-aged children and young people form and their effect on their health, wellbeing and achievement. Back to Duty

S129: Raise awareness of the impact of socio-economic disadvantage including digital poverty, and work with others to facilitate policy changes that support school aged children and young people to achieve their potential. Back to Duty

S130: Evaluate lived experiences which may impact on school aged children and young people’s behaviour, health and wellbeing, ensuring that their needs, rights and safety remain paramount and central to all planning interventions. Back to Duty

S131: Respect parents’ and carers’ need for autonomy and control with sensitivity to a wide range of attitudes, values, beliefs, expectations, faiths, cultures and approaches to parenting, using a transparent approach whilst simultaneously safeguarding the welfare of school-aged children and young people at all times. Back to Duty

S132: Synthesise data, information and intelligence related to home, school and community environments, and apply professional judgement to determine how this intelligence can be widely reported to positively influence policy and strategy to improve health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

S133: Evaluate existing services to identify gaps in available support for school-aged children and young people and develop strategies to maximise support and access to relevant services according to age and maturity. Back to Duty

S134: Advocate for school-aged children and young people in public health services, ensuring their voice is heard, supporting co-production, co-design and development at universal, targeted and specialist service levels. Back to Duty

S135: Design and lead the delivery and evaluation of evidence based school nursing services, educational campaigns and co-produced interventions aligned to regional and national public health initiatives to protect and promote the health and wellbeing of school-aged children and young people. Back to Duty

S136: Influence, advocate for and make decisions for the safety and wellbeing of school-aged children and young people at interagency meetings and hearings. Back to Duty

S137: Capture the lived experience and lived existence of school-aged children and young people and evaluate how this and other sources of evidence influences and informs current and future specialist practice, policy decisions and school nursing service design. Back to Duty

S138: Lead and promote visibility of school nursing services and ensure accessibility through engagement with school aged children and young people, parents, carers, families, school staff, other professionals and voluntary sector organisations. Back to Duty

S139: Design school nursing services which recognise and respect children and young people’s privacy and dignity. Back to Duty

S140: Critically analyse the opportunities, benefits and risks for school nursing services when communicating with school-aged children and young people face to face and via social media and virtual platforms. Back to Duty

S141: Work in partnership with relevant professionals and services to ensure the transition of support for school-aged children and young people to adult services mitigates risks and is positive, seamless and effective. Back to Duty

S142: Appraise the impact of socio-economic and political issues on work and health to implement occupational health interventions. Back to Duty

S143: Critically examine the relationship between worklessness and health and their association with health inequalities that affect people, families and communities. Back to Duty

S144: Lead an occupational health service that is open, holistic, inclusive and responsive to wider socio-economic and health concerns including but not limited to safeguarding and abuse within and outside the workplace. Back to Duty

S145: Evaluate the relationship between work, life, mental and physical health and ill health to lead on proactive organisational approaches to promote and protect health and wellbeing within and outside the workplace. Back to Duty

S146: Identify individuals who may be vulnerable or at risk of direct and indirect abuse or harm within or outside the workplace, appropriately escalating and referring to other professionals and agencies. Back to Duty

S147: Lead the development, delivery and evaluation of inclusive, multifunctional occupational health services that meet the diverse needs of employees and organisations, adopting a life course approach. Back to Duty

S148: Identify emerging health issues, and signpost to available support for access to health and care services and other agencies to balance individual health and wellbeing with employment obligations. Back to Duty

S149: Use evidence to justify the impact and value of occupational health services for employees, organisations and the wider population. Back to Duty

S150: Interpret, inform and provide impartial advice on health and safety legislation and case law. Back to Duty

S151: Critically analyse and apply the principles of occupational hygiene, engineering controls and ergonomics when advising on the creation and maintenance of healthy work environments. Back to Duty

S152: Evaluate how disease, illness and impairment act as barriers to gaining, sustaining and returning to work and the impact of this on people and all areas of life. Back to Duty

S153: Influence and provide impartial advice on the design of inclusive, adaptive and supportive workplaces. Back to Duty

S154: Develop inclusive strategies that enable innovative, person-centred approaches for employees who may need adaptations and adjustments to their work due to health and wellbeing reasons. Back to Duty

S155: Develop evidence-informed strategies to support and enable employees with multiple or long-term conditions to have sustainable, productive and fulfilling work. Back to Duty

S156: Provide specialist, personalised occupational health advice on work adjustments to employees and employers which considers the impact of diagnoses, therapies, interventions, medications and treatments. Back to Duty

S157: Contribute to organisational disaster planning and preparedness to support business continuity and in optimising the ongoing safety and health of people. Back to Duty

S158: Develop sustainable, data-driven occupational health strategies with short, medium and long term aims to improve employee health and wellbeing, embedded as part of the business improvement cycle. Back to Duty

S159: Focus on inclusion and innovation in job design to lead, improve and innovate ways to address health hazards by elimination, mitigation and control. Back to Duty

S160: Lead on the organisational response to safe, appropriate and economically viable approaches to waste management for food, hazardous chemicals, biological and clinical waste, taking into consideration infection control measures and the impact of environmental pollution on health and wellbeing. Back to Duty

S161: Recognise and act on the importance of the environmental impact of work processes and products, and collaborate on reducing and controlling emissions and other pollutants that may impact on safety, health and wellbeing and the environment. Back to Duty

S162: Critically examine and apply the hierarchy of control to manage risks to health, safety and wellbeing in the workplace. Back to Duty

S163: Anticipate and appraise the impact of new and emerging technology to improve workability now and in the future. Back to Duty

S164: Facilitate workplace adjustments that enable wider participation of people in work, effectively using assistive technologies. Back to Duty

S165: Evaluate the impact of job redesign and the potential need for skills development and/or redeployment on the health and wellbeing of people. Back to Duty

S166: Critically examine the effect of worklessness on the health and wellbeing of people, families and communities. Back to Duty

S167: Critically appraise and use assistive technologies, recognising their potentially varied impact on individual people’s work and health. Back to Duty

S168: Triangulate and appraise organisational and workforce profiling data to secure resources for the development and delivery of occupational and employee health, safety and wellbeing. Back to Duty

S169: Create systems to allow data collection, information retrieval and dissemination protocols for enhancing occupational health nursing practice. Back to Duty

S170: Develop and manage a safe and effective occupational health nursing service, which promotes innovative, evidence-informed workplace protocols and strategies. Back to Duty

S171: Influence organisational policy and strategy for employee health and wellbeing which embraces and reflects national and international public health agendas and strategies. Back to Duty

S172: Critically apply business acumen to develop, promote and report on evidence-based occupational health and wellbeing initiatives that take account of economic and non-economic resources. Back to Duty

S173: Evaluate, synthesise and communicate data and information to quantify and qualify the positive impact of occupational health interventions on workplace and business targets and outcomes. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Act in accordance with the NMC Code. Back to Duty

B2: Show leadership, act professionally and be professionally curious. Back to Duty

B3: Be self-reflective and aware. Back to Duty

B4: Be open and flexible. Back to Duty

B5: Be positive, resilient, proactive and influential. Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

NMC Approved Qualifications. Specialist Community Public Health Nursing

Level: 7 (non-degree qualification)


Additional details


Regulated standard

This is a regulated occupation.

Regulator body:

Nursing and Midwifery Council

Training Provider must be approved by regulator body

EPAO must be approved by regulator body

Occupational Level:

7

Duration (months):

18

Review

This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

Status: Retired
Level: 7
Degree: non-integrated degree
Reference: ST1418
Version: 1.0
Date updated: 22/11/2023
Route: Health and science
Typical duration to gateway: 18 months (this does not include EPA period)
Maximum funding: £14000
Options: Health Visitor, Occupational Health Nurse, School Nurse
Regulated standard:
This is a regulated occupation
Regulator body:Nursing and Midwifery Council
Training Provider must be approved by regulator body
EPAO must be approved by regulator body
LARS Code: 728
EQA Provider: Office for Students

Contact us about this apprenticeship

Employers involved in creating the standard: Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Bolton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust , Department of Health and Social Care, Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust, Derbyshire Healthcare Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire Health and Care NHS Foundation Trust, HCRG Care Group, Health Education England - Talent for Care, Hertfordshire Community NHS Trust, Institute of Health Visitors, Locala Health and Wellbeing, Manchester Local Care Organisation, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT), National School of Occupational Health, NHS England, North Somerset Community Partnership, Nottingham Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Nursing and Midwifery Council, People Asset Management Group, Royal College of Nursing, Sirona Care and Health, Skills for Health, Society of Occupational Medicine, Stockport NHS Foundation Trust, Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Unite the Union, Whittington Health NHS Trust

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 Occupational standard revised 22/11/2023 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 20/09/2023 21/11/2023 Not set

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