Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST1322
  3. Version: 1.0
  4. Level: 6
  5. Degree: integrated degree
  6. Typical duration to gateway: 40 months
  7. Typical EPA period: 6 months
  8. Maximum funding: £23000
  9. Route: Protective services
  10. Date updated: 16/05/2023
  11. Approved for delivery: 11 May 2023
  12. Lars code: 707
  13. EQA provider: Office for Students
  14. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
Print apprenticeship summary

Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Contribute to the local or national resilience and security agendas.

Occupation summary

Resilience and emergencies professionals are found in Category 1 and Category 2 organisations as defined in the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (for example emergency services, local authorities, NHS, utility companies), military, the voluntary, charitable, and international sectors, and government. They are also found in the private sector and those subject to major accident hazard, radiation, or pipeline regulation (for example companies transporting or storing toxic chemicals).

The broad purpose of the occupation is to contribute to the local or national resilience and security agendas. They protect and ensure public safety and continuity of essential services by effectively mitigating risks, preparing and planning for emergencies, and coordinating the response to incidents and recovery after the event. Working with stakeholders before, during, and after an incident, they develop locally appropriate ways to avoid disruptive events and prepare and recover from disasters. They ensure organisations satisfy their statutory obligations related to hazards and threats. For example, the Civil Contingencies Act 2004, Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH), Water Act 2014, Network and Information Systems Regulations 2018, Health and Social Care Act 2012.

In their daily work, a resilience and emergencies professional interacts with stakeholders at all levels of seniority across Category 1 and Category 2 organisations, local or national government, the military, voluntary organisations, community groups, and members of the public. Many resilience and emergencies professionals will work within or interact with a local resilience forum including planning for and embedding arrangements for military aid to civil authorities.

A resilience and emergencies professional will be responsible for working independently or in a small team, internally and externally, to research and assess how hazards and threats might impact the organisation and the people who rely on them. They consider a wide range of risks to people, business, and the environment. For example, severe weather, flooding, social disorder, industrial action, industrial accidents, failures in critical national infrastructure, or pandemics. They must research, assess and anticipate emerging threats. These may be caused by global factors such as climate change, economic and political instability, migration and demographic change. Resilience and emergencies professionals must lead and empower others to contribute to strategies that mitigate risks and achieve sustainable outcomes. To ensure their organisation and others are appropriately prepared to respond when emergencies occur, they must develop and deliver training and emergency exercises and ensure lessons are learned and captured. Whilst resilience and emergencies professionals would not typically be responsible for departmental budgets, they need an awareness of funding and financing mechanisms, costs and resourcing challenges associated with emergencies and resilience. Some resilience and emergencies professionals may be required to be on an on-call rota and may need to be able to respond to incidents and emergencies 24/7/365 as part of an on-call mechanism.

Typical job titles include:

Civil contingencies officer Emergency planner Emergency planning officer Emergency preparedness officer Resilience advisor Resilience and response officer Resilience officer

Duties

  • Duty 1 Apply, maintain and improve structures and systems used to govern and improve resilience and emergency activity (for example, monitoring and evaluation, quality assurance, change management, and stakeholder accountability).
  • Duty 2 Research and analyse intelligence (data, opinion and information) relating to resilience and emergencies and manage information safely and securely.
  • Duty 3 Engage proactively, communicate and collaborate effectively with a wide range of resilience partners to improve resilience.
  • Duty 4 Project manage and administrate programmes or projects to deliver resilience outcomes and track associated costs.
  • Duty 5 Anticipate, assess and support the prioritisation of risks, threats and potential consequences.
  • Duty 6 Contribute to the analysis and development of resilience and readiness capabilities to ensure risks are reduced and the demands of an emergency response can be met.
  • Duty 7 Contribute to the mitigation or prevention of, or adaptation to, risks in a resilient and sustainable way.
  • Duty 8 Prepare the arrangements and plans needed to respond effectively to the anticipated demands and consequences of disruptive events.
  • Duty 9 Train individuals and teams in a response role, and exercise and validate emergency plans.
  • Duty 10 Support a response that limits impacts and meets the needs which result during disruptive events.
  • Duty 11 Work to ensure a resilient and sustainable recovery can be achieved after disruptive events for all affected.

Apprenticeship summary

ST1322, resilience and emergencies professional level 6

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 40 months. The EPA period is typically 6 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the research project report and questions, the project's title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO and a project summary submitted

  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, you must submit a portfolio of evidence

  • passed any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard

For the resilience and emergencies professional, the qualification required is:

BSc/BA Resilience and emergencies management

Assessment methods



Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.


Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with Emergency Planning Society for Full membership

Please contact the professional body for more details.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

Resilience and emergencies professionals are found in Category 1 and Category 2 organisations as defined in the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (for example emergency services, local authorities, NHS, utility companies), military, the voluntary, charitable, and international sectors, and government. They are also found in the private sector and those subject to major accident hazard, radiation, or pipeline regulation (for example companies transporting or storing toxic chemicals).

The broad purpose of the occupation is to contribute to the local or national resilience and security agendas. They protect and ensure public safety and continuity of essential services by effectively mitigating risks, preparing and planning for emergencies, and coordinating the response to incidents and recovery after the event. Working with stakeholders before, during, and after an incident, they develop locally appropriate ways to avoid disruptive events and prepare and recover from disasters. They ensure organisations satisfy their statutory obligations related to hazards and threats. For example, the Civil Contingencies Act 2004, Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH), Water Act 2014, Network and Information Systems Regulations 2018, Health and Social Care Act 2012.

In their daily work, a resilience and emergencies professional interacts with stakeholders at all levels of seniority across Category 1 and Category 2 organisations, local or national government, the military, voluntary organisations, community groups, and members of the public. Many resilience and emergencies professionals will work within or interact with a local resilience forum including planning for and embedding arrangements for military aid to civil authorities.

A resilience and emergencies professional will be responsible for working independently or in a small team, internally and externally, to research and assess how hazards and threats might impact the organisation and the people who rely on them. They consider a wide range of risks to people, business, and the environment. For example, severe weather, flooding, social disorder, industrial action, industrial accidents, failures in critical national infrastructure, or pandemics. They must research, assess and anticipate emerging threats. These may be caused by global factors such as climate change, economic and political instability, migration and demographic change. Resilience and emergencies professionals must lead and empower others to contribute to strategies that mitigate risks and achieve sustainable outcomes. To ensure their organisation and others are appropriately prepared to respond when emergencies occur, they must develop and deliver training and emergency exercises and ensure lessons are learned and captured. Whilst resilience and emergencies professionals would not typically be responsible for departmental budgets, they need an awareness of funding and financing mechanisms, costs and resourcing challenges associated with emergencies and resilience. Some resilience and emergencies professionals may be required to be on an on-call rota and may need to be able to respond to incidents and emergencies 24/7/365 as part of an on-call mechanism.

Typical job titles include:

Civil contingencies officer Emergency planner Emergency planning officer Emergency preparedness officer Resilience advisor Resilience and response officer Resilience officer

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Apply, maintain and improve structures and systems used to govern and improve resilience and emergency activity (for example, monitoring and evaluation, quality assurance, change management, and stakeholder accountability).

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K27

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S25

B1 B9

Duty 2 Research and analyse intelligence (data, opinion and information) relating to resilience and emergencies and manage information safely and securely.

K6 K7 K10 K18

S7 S8 S23

Duty 3 Engage proactively, communicate and collaborate effectively with a wide range of resilience partners to improve resilience.

K3 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11

S3 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12

B3 B5 B8

Duty 4 Project manage and administrate programmes or projects to deliver resilience outcomes and track associated costs.

K2 K5 K27

S2 S4 S6 S12 S25 S26

B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 5 Anticipate, assess and support the prioritisation of risks, threats and potential consequences.

K7 K11 K12 K13 K17 K20

S13 S14 S15 S17 S20

B2 B5

Duty 6 Contribute to the analysis and development of resilience and readiness capabilities to ensure risks are reduced and the demands of an emergency response can be met.

K1 K7 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17

S7 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S20 S26

B5 B8

Duty 7 Contribute to the mitigation or prevention of, or adaptation to, risks in a resilient and sustainable way.

K1 K11 K12 K13 K17 K18

S13 S14 S16 S17 S20 S21 S26

B5

Duty 8 Prepare the arrangements and plans needed to respond effectively to the anticipated demands and consequences of disruptive events.

K2 K3 K9 K11 K14 K15 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21 K26 K27

S6 S9 S10 S16 S18 S19 S21 S22 S25 S26

B2 B4

Duty 9 Train individuals and teams in a response role, and exercise and validate emergency plans.

K3 K9 K14 K15 K19 K20 K21 K23

S3 S5 S6 S18 S19

B1 B2 B3 B6 B8

Duty 10 Support a response that limits impacts and meets the needs which result during disruptive events.

K3 K16 K19 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26

S15 S22 S24 S26

B1 B2 B4 B6 B7 B9

Duty 11 Work to ensure a resilient and sustainable recovery can be achieved after disruptive events for all affected.

K3 K16 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26

S3 S5 S15 S23 S24 S26

B1 B2 B4 B6 B7

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Theories and principles linking societal and organisational resilience, security, sustainability and global change. Back to Duty

K2: Governance structures and business processes and their significance in emergencies and resilience. Back to Duty

K3: The role, responsibilities, culture, and key capabilities of the employing organisation, and key partners or stakeholder organisations in resilience, emergencies, and recovery. Back to Duty

K4: Approaches to driving quality, managing change and improvement used in their organisation. The benefits and limitations of these approaches for improving collective resilience across partners and wider society. Back to Duty

K5: Legislation, regulation and associated guidance and its role in resilience and emergencies. Back to Duty

K6: How information and knowledge held by stakeholders can be used across the emergency cycle. Back to Duty

K7: Sources of and types of intelligence, data, and information; and factors that affect its quality and suitability. Back to Duty

K8: A range of engagement methods and resources used for people centred working. Back to Duty

K9: Theories and principles of teamwork, leadership, and partnership working and their application to working in resilience and emergencies. Back to Duty

K10: The need for and challenges in data protection, information management, security, and sharing. Back to Duty

K11: Risk communication and decision theory, and factors that influence individual and collective action. Back to Duty

K12: Theories and models of risk. Back to Duty

K13: Methods and models used to assess and prioritise risks. Back to Duty

K14: Theories and principles of learning and training to inform training delivery. Back to Duty

K15: Theories and principles that underpin exercise design and delivery. Back to Duty

K16: Requirements for and approaches to health, safety, and wellbeing of practitioners, volunteers, and the public. Back to Duty

K17: Principles and models for integrating risk, crisis and emergency management and associated risk management options. Back to Duty

K18: Current published standards and good practice guidance relating to emergencies and resilience. Back to Duty

K19: Arrangements, plans, capabilities and readiness activities within area of responsibility. Back to Duty

K20: The characteristics of disruptive events (for example, potential impacts, consequences, and needs). Back to Duty

K21: Roles and systems for managing incidents. Back to Duty

K22: How decisions taken during emergency response can affect recovery outcomes. Back to Duty

K23: Human factors and adaptive capacity in emergency response and resilience. Back to Duty

K24: Challenges to continuity of business services during a crisis or emergency. Back to Duty

K25: Theories and approaches to planning, managing, and facilitating recovery. Back to Duty

K26: Needs of individuals, communities or organisations in response and recovery, and factors that may influence the time and extent of recovery. Back to Duty

K27: Approaches and challenges to financing in resilience and emergencies. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Apply policies, legislation, regulations and guidance to ensure compliance and resilience. Back to Duty

S2: Apply relevant governance structures, standards, policies, and frameworks to evidence and assure performance, impacts, and resilient outcomes. Back to Duty

S3: Contribute to the debriefing process (post-exercise or post-incident). Back to Duty

S4: Contribute to the accountability process for performance, impacts, resilience outcomes, and areas for improvement to stakeholders. Back to Duty

S5: Support lesson learning, improvement and sustainable change. Back to Duty

S6: Keep records of decisions, actions, those responsible and rationale. Back to Duty

S7: Collect and analyse information in support of resilience and emergencies. Back to Duty

S8: Use and improve systems, processes, or applications to gather, manage, visualise, and share information. Back to Duty

S9: Scale, coordinate, or integrate activities to maximise resilience and ensure interoperability (locally, regionally, sector wide or nationally as appropriate to role and employing organisation). Back to Duty

S10: Assess the information needs across the emergency cycle. Back to Duty

S11: Identify, engage, and communicate information with a range of stakeholders. Back to Duty

S12: Project manage initiatives or activities within area of responsibility. Back to Duty

S13: Evaluate the risk context. Back to Duty

S14: Identify and assess risks. Back to Duty

S15: Make timely and evidence-based decisions. Back to Duty

S16: Facilitate the development, maintenance, or implementation of resilience and emergency capabilities (for example, early warning, communications, technical specialisms, safety, security, resource and supply). Back to Duty

S17: Assess the effectiveness and relative value (for example, economic, environmental, and societal) of risk management options. Back to Duty

S18: Contribute to the development and delivery of resilience and emergency training. Back to Duty

S19: Contribute to the design and delivery of emergency exercises. Back to Duty

S20: Apply an all-risks approach. Back to Duty

S21: Scope, document, review and update emergency, crisis or continuity arrangements. Back to Duty

S22: Support emergency response within scope of responsibilities (in an incident or as part of an exercise). Back to Duty

S23: Assess and prioritise recovery needs. Back to Duty

S24: Apply recovery plans and exit strategies to a real or simulated emergency or crisis (during an incident or as part of an exercise). Back to Duty

S25: Consider financial implications of resilience or emergency activities. Back to Duty

S26: Monitor dynamic situations and the effectiveness of interventions. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Empowers and leads others. Back to Duty

B2: Situation awareness; makes sense of current situation, uses foresight and sees the big picture. Back to Duty

B3: Builds strong, inclusive, relationships and networks. Back to Duty

B4: Adaptable and creative problem solver. Back to Duty

B5: Confident to question and challenge constructively. Back to Duty

B6: Decisive and takes responsibility for decisions. Back to Duty

B7: Delivers results at pace. Back to Duty

B8: Reflective and resilient practitioner - develops self and others. Back to Duty

B9: Act ethically. Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

BSc/BA Resilience and emergencies management

Level: 6 (integrated degree)

Professional recognition

This standard aligns with the following professional recognition:

  • Emergency Planning Society for Full membership
Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.0

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the resilience and emergencies professional degree-apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Resilience and emergencies professional apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

A degree-apprenticeship awards a degree with the achievement of the apprenticeship. The degree learning outcomes must be aligned with the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) in the apprenticeship. The degree must be completed, passed and awarded alongside the resilience and emergencies professional degree-apprenticeship.

The apprentice must complete their training and meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA. The EPA will assess occupational competence.

A degree-apprenticeship must be delivered by a Higher Education Provider (HEP) that is on both the register of apprenticeship training providers (RoATP) and the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO). The apprentice's employer must select an HEP who is on both registers.

If the HEP is using a credit framework, the EPA must contribute to the total credit value, and must be delivered in line with this EPA plan. However, the number of credits devoted to EPA may vary across HEP’s. The recommended EPA contribution is 20% of the total credit value.

A full-time resilience and emergencies professional apprentice typically spends 40 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway). The apprentice must spend at least 12 months on-programme and complete the required amount of off-the-job training in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA should then be completed within an EPA period lasting typically 6 months.

Occupational competence is outlined by the EPA grade descriptors and determined, when assessed in line with this EPA plan, by an independent assessor who is an occupational expert and confirms the overall EPA grade.

Assessment method 1 - research project report and questions:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall degree-apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the degree-apprenticeship:

  • fail

  • pass

  • merit

  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 40 months

The apprentice must:

  • complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) outlined in this degree-apprenticeship’s occupational standard
  • complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • complete training towards the qualification listed in the resilience and emergencies professional degree-apprenticeship except undertaking the EPA.

The qualification required is:

BSc/BA Resilience and emergencies management

  • compile a portfolio of evidence

End-point assessment gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the degree-apprenticeship.

The apprentice must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • have completed and passed all required elements of the resilience and emergencies professional degree-apprenticeship except the EPA

For the research project report and questions, the apprentice must submit a title, subject, and scope of the project and this must be agreed with the employer and EPAO. To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable.

For the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to their EPAO, including any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 6 months

The grades available for each assessment method are below

Research project report and questions:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Overall EPA and degree-apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

Professional recognition

This degree-apprenticeship aligns with: Emergency Planning Society for Full membership

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 6 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the degree-apprenticeship. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider, but the employer must make the decision. The apprentice will then enter the gateway.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

They must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and Mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • have completed and passed all required elements of the BSc/BA Resilience and emergencies management degree-apprenticeship except the EPA

  • submit the title, subject, and scope of the project and this must be agreed with the employer and EPAO for the research project report and questions
  • submit a portfolio of evidence for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 12 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. All sensitive information must be anonymised or redacted prior to submission. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace policies and procedures
  • witness statements
  • work plans, project logs, reports, videos (maximum duration of 15 minutes), web content
  • progress review documentation
  • debriefing documents
  • meeting minutes and action logs
  • published models, diagrams, theories, or standards

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the discussion. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the discussion. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to their EPAO, including any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Research project report and questions

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must start after the apprentice has gone through the gateway. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship. The EPAO must confirm that it provides the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • project with a project output
  • question and answer session

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • it allows apprentices to evaluate an existing resilience intervention and make recommendations for improvement, or propose a new resilience intervention with justification
  • it allows apprentices to demonstrate knowledge, skills, and behaviours holistically
  • it can produce something that is of genuine business benefit to the apprentice's employer

Component 1: Project with a project output

Delivery

The research project report and questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable.

The project output must be in the form of a report.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. They must complete and submit the report to the EPAO by the end of week 20 of the EPA period. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within this period, to plan and complete their project. The apprentice must complete their project and the production of its components unaided.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project which could include technical internal or external support. However, the project output must be the apprentice’s own work and reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm that the project output is the apprentice’s own work when it is submitted.

The apprentice must produce an independently researched and written project report. The report must identify an area within the business' resilience and emergencies capabilities that needs change and improvement. For example, an evaluation of the strengths and limitations of an existing resilience intervention or process or a proposal for a new resilience intervention or approach to fill an identified gap. The apprentice must collect and present evidence of the gap in capability or the need for an intervention, evidence that justifies recommended changes, and how the recommended changes could be implemented. The report must include notification of ethics authorisation and confidentiality restrictions on content as appropriate.

The project report must include the following:

  • scope and context
    • aims and objectives of the research
    • overview of the current or proposed resilience intervention
  • research and evaluation methods
  • evaluation or justification of the ability (capacity) of the intervention to mitigate the risk and/or aid response to disruptive events, including a comparison of models of risk
  • evaluation or justification of the governance process for the intervention
  • conclusions and recommendations

In addition, the report should include:

  • a cover page including the level of sensitivity as appropriate
  • confirmation of originality signed by the employer and the apprentice
  • an executive summary
  • table of contents
  • a complete reference list
  • research ethics authorisation
  • any relevant illustrations, diagrams, and appendices

The project report has a word count of 8000 words. A tolerance of 10% above or below the word count is allowed at the apprentice’s discretion. Appendices, references and diagrams are not included in this total. The project report must map, in an appendix, how it evidences the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Component 2: Question and answer session

Delivery

The EPAO must give the apprentice 2 weeks notice of the question and answer session.

Apprentices will be required to answer questions based on their project output.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to clarify or add depth to the information included in the report.

The independent assessor must have at least 3 weeks to review the project and project output(s) in advance of the question- and- answer session to allow them to prepare questions.

The question- and- answer session will be arranged by the EPAO in consultation with the employer and apprentice. The question- and- answer session should take place on a one-to-one basis, either face-to-face or via online video conferencing.

The question- and- answer session must last for 30 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the total time by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete their last point or respond to a question if necessary. The question- and- answer session must allow the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs at the highest possible grade.

The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The independent assessor must use the full time available for questioning.

Those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to show within the report can instead be covered by questioning, although these should be kept to a minimum.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The project components must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs demonstrated in the report
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The question- and answer- session must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises). The question- and- answer session should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The question- and- answer session can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the research project report and questions:

  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate their competency across the KSBs mapped to this EPA method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • it allows for the assessment of KSBs that do not occur on a predictable or regular basis
  • it tests KSBs holistically and objectively
  • it can be conducted remotely, potentially reducing cost

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the professional discussion.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to assess the following themes:

  • working together
  • information needs and communication
  • response capability and plans
  • training and development
  • exercising
  • response (real or simulated)
  • recovery (real or simulated)

The EPAO must give an apprentice 2 weeks notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 1 week to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 90 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 12 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required. The independent assessor must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Grading

Research project report and questions

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Risk and resilience context
K1 K12 S13

Evaluates the risk context in which they operate, with reference to common theories and models of risk and links wider concepts of resilience, sustainability and global changes. (K1, K12, S13).

 

 

 

 

Evaluates the risk context in which they operate, and influencing factors, by applying theories of risk to examine the complex, systemic, and subjective nature of risk. (K12, S13)

 

Methods for research and analysis
K6 K7 K8 S7 S10 B4

Analyses information needs across the emergency cycle, using a range of methods to engage stakeholders and improve resilience outcomes. (K6, K8, S10)

Collects, analyses and evaluates information from a range of intelligence and data sources to solve problems and support the development of resilience. (K7, S7, B4)

 

 

Evaluates the limitations of the method of data collection and analysis used and draws conclusions on how quality issues can be effectively addressed. (K7, S7, B4)

 

Risk and risk reduction
K13 K17 S14 S17 S20

Assesses and prioritises risks to the project, justifying the chosen method. (K13, S14)

Analyses the effectiveness of potential risk management models in improving emergency management and resilience, justifying how risks and threats can be managed (mitigated, controlled, and prepared for) within an 'all-risks' approach. (K17, S17, S20)

Identifies potential conflicts, unintended consequences, or gaps (unaddressed risks) in the 'all-risks' approach and suggests ways to minimise future risk and threats. (K17, S17, S20)

Governance of the intervention
K2 K5 K27 S1 S2 S25 B9

Explains how the project intervention complies in practice with relevant legislation, regulation, and associated guidance and how their application impacts on resilience outcomes. (K5, S1).

Explains the governance process for the intervention, demonstrating that they have applied relevant sector standards, policies and frameworks in an ethical way. (K2, S2, B9).

Explains the approach to financing the intervention, the challenges associated with this approach, and the implications this could have on resilience outcomes. (K27, S25)

Critically evaluates the governance process for the intervention including the impact of non-compliance and unethical practice on the organisation, external stakeholders, and resilience outcomes. (K2, S2, B9)

 

Improvement and change
K4 S5 S8 S12 S16 B5

Supports improvement through challenging and questioning existing practice and using lessons learnt to drive sustainable change. (S5, B5)

Explains the approach to driving quality and managing change outlining the benefits and limitations of the approach selected and why the chosen approach will on balance, facilitate the development, maintenance or implementation of resilience and emergency capabilities. (K4, S16)

Justifies their approach to project management, explaining how it will support improvement and collective resilience. (S8, S12)

Appraises the challenges to enacting change, within the context of the approach to change taken in the project, including reference to how change and improvement can be sustained. (K4, S5)

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Working together for resilience
K3 K9 S4 S9 B1 B3

 

Explains how they scale, coordinate or integrate activities and build positive professional relationships with partners and stakeholders and ensure accountability measures are applied to improve resilience outcomes. (K3, S4, S9, B3)

Explains how they lead and empower others to develop resilience and the theories and principles that inform their approach. (K9, B1)

 

Evaluates the role of key partner organisations and how their key capabilities have supported integrated approaches to resilience (K3, S9).

 

 

Information needs and communication
K10 K11 S11

Analyses the challenges of ensuring data is protected when data is stored, managed, and shared within their organisation and the risks of non-compliance with legislation and organisational procedure. (K10)

Examines how they apply risk communication and decision theory to influence and communicate with stakeholders and ensure risk communication plans evidence shared understanding. (K11, S11)

n/a

 

 

 

Response capability and plans
K16 K18 K19 S21

Analyses the impact of applying relevant published standards and good practice guidance relating to emergencies, resilience, on the health, safety and wellbeing of others in line with regulations. (K16, K18)

Explains how they develop and maintain resilience or emergency arrangements, plans, capabilities, readiness activities, and related documentation and their impact on emergency preparedness and resilience maturity with reference to examples from practice.  (K19, S21)

 

n/a

 

 

Training and development
K14 S18 B8

Explains how they apply the theories and principles of learning and training, including training needs analysis, design and delivery, to support resilience and emergency training and evaluates the outcomes. (K14, S18, B8)

 

 

 

Emergency exercises
K15 S3 S19

Analyses how they apply the theories and principles of exercise design and delivery to emergency exercise practice, debrief, and evaluation, and how this contributes to the development and maintenance of resilience capabilities for the organisation and other stakeholders in line with sector standards. (K15, S3, S19)

 

n/a 

 

Response
K20 K21 K22 K23 K24 S6 S15 S22 S26 B2 B6 B7

Examines how their organisation’s incident management system is structured to meet the demands of disruptive events, and how the characteristics of these events impact on the effectiveness of the system. (K20, K21) 

Discusses their role, decisions, and actions taken to support emergency response, and how they have monitored dynamic situations and addressed challenges to the continuity of business services (in an incident or as part of an exercise), in line with sector standards and best practice guidance. (K24, S6, S22, S26, B6)

Uses theory and examples from professional practice to illustrate how situation awareness, decision making (or failure to make decisions), adaptive capacity and other human factors can influence response and the impact on resilience outcomes. (K22, K23, S15, B2, B7)

 

n/a

 

Recovery
K25 K26 S23 S24

 

Justifies their approaches to the assessment of recovery needs and priorities and explains the factors that may influence the time and extent of recovery. (K26, S23)

Examines how theories and approaches to planning, managing, and facilitating recovery supports the application of recovery plans and exit strategies, using examples from real or simulated emergencies in practice. (K25, S24)

Evaluates a range of perspectives on “recovery” and recovery challenges from wider resilience practice. Draws conclusions on how risks can be reduced and, resilient and sustainable outcomes achieved during recovery. (K25, K26, S23, S24)

 

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the overall grade of:

  • fail

  • pass

  • merit

  • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the: research project report and questions and professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they will be awarded an overall fail.

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall EPA distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in both assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Research project report and questions Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Merit
Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does. The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and the EPAO should agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 5 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 6 months of the EPA outcome notification.

If the apprentice fails the project assessment method, they must amend the project output in line with the independent assessor’s feedback. The apprentice will be given 8 weeks to rework and submit the amended report.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to the strategies, policies and procedures that EPAOs must have in place to ensure valid, consistent and reliable end-point assessment decisions.

EPAOs for this EPA must adhere to all requirements within the roles and responsibilities table and:

  • appoint independent assessors who also:
    • have relevant experience of the occupation to at least occupational level 7 gained in the last 5 years
    • hold or are working towards fellowship of the higher education academy or a suitable assessor qualification
    • has at least a FHEQ level 7 (for example an MA or MSc)

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • using the employer’s premises

Professional recognition

This degree-apprenticeship aligns with: Full membershipfor Emergency Planning Society

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Theories and principles linking societal and organisational resilience, security, sustainability and global change.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K2

Governance structures and business processes and their significance in emergencies and resilience.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K3

The role, responsibilities, culture, and key capabilities of the employing organisation, and key partners or stakeholder organisations in resilience, emergencies, and recovery.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K4

Approaches to driving quality, managing change and improvement used in their organisation. The benefits and limitations of these approaches for improving collective resilience across partners and wider society.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K5

Legislation, regulation and associated guidance and its role in resilience and emergencies.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K6

How information and knowledge held by stakeholders can be used across the emergency cycle.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K7

Sources of and types of intelligence, data, and information; and factors that affect its quality and suitability.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K8

A range of engagement methods and resources used for people centred working.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K9

Theories and principles of teamwork, leadership, and partnership working and their application to working in resilience and emergencies.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K10

The need for and challenges in data protection, information management, security, and sharing.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K11

Risk communication and decision theory, and factors that influence individual and collective action.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K12

Theories and models of risk.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K13

Methods and models used to assess and prioritise risks.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K14

Theories and principles of learning and training to inform training delivery.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K15

Theories and principles that underpin exercise design and delivery.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K16

Requirements for and approaches to health, safety, and wellbeing of practitioners, volunteers, and the public.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K17

Principles and models for integrating risk, crisis and emergency management and associated risk management options.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
K18

Current published standards and good practice guidance relating to emergencies and resilience.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19

Arrangements, plans, capabilities and readiness activities within area of responsibility.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K20

The characteristics of disruptive events (for example, potential impacts, consequences, and needs).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K21

Roles and systems for managing incidents.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K22

How decisions taken during emergency response can affect recovery outcomes.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K23

Human factors and adaptive capacity in emergency response and resilience.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K24

Challenges to continuity of business services during a crisis or emergency.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K25

Theories and approaches to planning, managing, and facilitating recovery.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K26

Needs of individuals, communities or organisations in response and recovery, and factors that may influence the time and extent of recovery.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K27

Approaches and challenges to financing in resilience and emergencies.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Apply policies, legislation, regulations and guidance to ensure compliance and resilience.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S2

Apply relevant governance structures, standards, policies, and frameworks to evidence and assure performance, impacts, and resilient outcomes.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S3

Contribute to the debriefing process (post-exercise or post-incident).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S4

Contribute to the accountability process for performance, impacts, resilience outcomes, and areas for improvement to stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S5

Support lesson learning, improvement and sustainable change.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S6

Keep records of decisions, actions, those responsible and rationale.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S7

Collect and analyse information in support of resilience and emergencies.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S8

Use and improve systems, processes, or applications to gather, manage, visualise, and share information.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S9

Scale, coordinate, or integrate activities to maximise resilience and ensure interoperability (locally, regionally, sector wide or nationally as appropriate to role and employing organisation).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S10

Assess the information needs across the emergency cycle.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S11

Identify, engage, and communicate information with a range of stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12

Project manage initiatives or activities within area of responsibility.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S13

Evaluate the risk context.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S14

Identify and assess risks.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S15

Make timely and evidence-based decisions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S16

Facilitate the development, maintenance, or implementation of resilience and emergency capabilities (for example, early warning, communications, technical specialisms, safety, security, resource and supply).

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S17

Assess the effectiveness and relative value (for example, economic, environmental, and societal) of risk management options.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S18

Contribute to the development and delivery of resilience and emergency training.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S19

Contribute to the design and delivery of emergency exercises.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S20

Apply an all-risks approach.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S21

Scope, document, review and update emergency, crisis or continuity arrangements.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S22

Support emergency response within scope of responsibilities (in an incident or as part of an exercise).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S23

Assess and prioritise recovery needs.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S24

Apply recovery plans and exit strategies to a real or simulated emergency or crisis (during an incident or as part of an exercise).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S25

Consider financial implications of resilience or emergency activities.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
S26

Monitor dynamic situations and the effectiveness of interventions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Empowers and leads others.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B2

Situation awareness; makes sense of current situation, uses foresight and sees the big picture.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3

Builds strong, inclusive, relationships and networks.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B4

Adaptable and creative problem solver.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
B5

Confident to question and challenge constructively.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions
B6

Decisive and takes responsibility for decisions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B7

Delivers results at pace.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B8

Reflective and resilient practitioner - develops self and others.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B9

Act ethically.

Back to Grading
Research project report and questions

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Research project report and questions

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Risk and resilience context
K1 K12
S13

Theories and principles linking societal and organisational resilience, security, sustainability and global change. (K1)

Theories and models of risk. (K12)

Evaluate the risk context. (S13)

None

Methods for research and analysis
K6 K7 K8
S7 S10
B4

How information and knowledge held by stakeholders can be used across the emergency cycle. (K6)

Sources of and types of intelligence, data, and information; and factors that affect its quality and suitability. (K7)

A range of engagement methods and resources used for people centred working. (K8)

Collect and analyse information in support of resilience and emergencies. (S7)

Assess the information needs across the emergency cycle. (S10)

Adaptable and creative problem solver. (B4)

Risk and risk reduction
K13 K17
S14 S17 S20

Methods and models used to assess and prioritise risks. (K13)

Principles and models for integrating risk, crisis and emergency management and associated risk management options. (K17)

Identify and assess risks. (S14)

Assess the effectiveness and relative value (for example, economic, environmental, and societal) of risk management options. (S17)

Apply an all-risks approach. (S20)

None

Governance of the intervention
K2 K5 K27
S1 S2 S25
B9

Governance structures and business processes and their significance in emergencies and resilience. (K2)

Legislation, regulation and associated guidance and its role in resilience and emergencies. (K5)

Approaches and challenges to financing in resilience and emergencies. (K27)

Apply policies, legislation, regulations and guidance to ensure compliance and resilience. (S1)

Apply relevant governance structures, standards, policies, and frameworks to evidence and assure performance, impacts, and resilient outcomes. (S2)

Consider financial implications of resilience or emergency activities. (S25)

Act ethically. (B9)

Improvement and change
K4
S5 S8 S12 S16
B5

Approaches to driving quality, managing change and improvement used in their organisation. The benefits and limitations of these approaches for improving collective resilience across partners and wider society. (K4)

Support lesson learning, improvement and sustainable change. (S5)

Use and improve systems, processes, or applications to gather, manage, visualise, and share information. (S8)

Project manage initiatives or activities within area of responsibility. (S12)

Facilitate the development, maintenance, or implementation of resilience and emergency capabilities (for example, early warning, communications, technical specialisms, safety, security, resource and supply). (S16)

Confident to question and challenge constructively. (B5)

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Working together for resilience
K3 K9
S4 S9
B1 B3

The role, responsibilities, culture, and key capabilities of the employing organisation, and key partners or stakeholder organisations in resilience, emergencies, and recovery. (K3)

Theories and principles of teamwork, leadership, and partnership working and their application to working in resilience and emergencies. (K9)

Contribute to the accountability process for performance, impacts, resilience outcomes, and areas for improvement to stakeholders. (S4)

Scale, coordinate, or integrate activities to maximise resilience and ensure interoperability (locally, regionally, sector wide or nationally as appropriate to role and employing organisation). (S9)

Empowers and leads others. (B1)

Builds strong, inclusive, relationships and networks. (B3)

Information needs and communication
K10 K11
S11

The need for and challenges in data protection, information management, security, and sharing. (K10)

Risk communication and decision theory, and factors that influence individual and collective action. (K11)

Identify, engage, and communicate information with a range of stakeholders. (S11)

None

Response capability and plans
K16 K18 K19
S21

Requirements for and approaches to health, safety, and wellbeing of practitioners, volunteers, and the public. (K16)

Current published standards and good practice guidance relating to emergencies and resilience. (K18)

Arrangements, plans, capabilities and readiness activities within area of responsibility. (K19)

Scope, document, review and update emergency, crisis or continuity arrangements. (S21)

None

Training and development
K14
S18
B8

Theories and principles of learning and training to inform training delivery. (K14)

Contribute to the development and delivery of resilience and emergency training. (S18)

Reflective and resilient practitioner - develops self and others. (B8)

Emergency exercises
K15
S3 S19

Theories and principles that underpin exercise design and delivery. (K15)

Contribute to the debriefing process (post-exercise or post-incident). (S3)

Contribute to the design and delivery of emergency exercises. (S19)

None

Response
K20 K21 K22 K23 K24
S6 S15 S22 S26
B2 B6 B7

The characteristics of disruptive events (for example, potential impacts, consequences, and needs). (K20)

Roles and systems for managing incidents. (K21)

How decisions taken during emergency response can affect recovery outcomes. (K22)

Human factors and adaptive capacity in emergency response and resilience. (K23)

Challenges to continuity of business services during a crisis or emergency. (K24)

Keep records of decisions, actions, those responsible and rationale. (S6)

Make timely and evidence-based decisions. (S15)

Support emergency response within scope of responsibilities (in an incident or as part of an exercise). (S22)

Monitor dynamic situations and the effectiveness of interventions. (S26)

Situation awareness; makes sense of current situation, uses foresight and sees the big picture. (B2)

Decisive and takes responsibility for decisions. (B6)

Delivers results at pace. (B7)

Recovery
K25 K26
S23 S24

Theories and approaches to planning, managing, and facilitating recovery. (K25)

Needs of individuals, communities or organisations in response and recovery, and factors that may influence the time and extent of recovery. (K26)

Assess and prioritise recovery needs. (S23)

Apply recovery plans and exit strategies to a real or simulated emergency or crisis (during an incident or as part of an exercise). (S24)

None

Employers involved in creating the standard: Environment Agency, Ministry of Defence, Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth University, MAGNOX, Cogent Skills, West Mercia Local Resilience Forum, West Mercia Police, Suffolk Resilience Unit, National Ambulance Resilience Unit, NHS England and NHS Improvement, Emergency Planning Society (EPS), British Red Cross, Heathrow Airport, Surrey Heartlands CCG, Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, West Midlands Fire and Rescue, Carmarthenshire County Council, Somerset County Council, Staffordshire Fire and Rescue, Essex Police, Institute for Civil Protection and Emergency Management (ICPEM).

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