Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST1340
  3. Version: 1.0
  4. Level: 6
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 24 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 4 months
  7. Maximum funding: £17000
  8. Route: Creative and design
  9. Date updated: 24/11/2023
  10. Approved for delivery: 24 November 2023
  11. Lars code: 739
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual
  13. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
Print apprenticeship summary

Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Develop strategic campaigns, or one-off pieces of communication, that meet a client brief.

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in advertising, marketing, branding agencies. Across a range of sectors as creatives are either employed in house or in commercial agencies. Creatives can work for agencies and social media owners. Agencies can support multinational corporations through to small & medium sized enterprises. They also work for media agencies, tech agencies and other businesses. There are an increasing number of larger brands who have in-house creative teams, such as Specsavers, Unilever and Barclays Bank and a creative may work directly for them. Creatives are most often hired in teams although some agencies hire single creatives. Some creatives will work on a freelance basis and undertake contract work. They will usually report to an Executive Creative Director, and they will usually receive briefs from creative services. The role of a creative is transferrable with skills valued across multiple sectors.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to develop strategic campaigns, or one-off pieces of communication, that meet a client brief. Creatives will need to influence stakeholders, working with many interconnecting sectors, partners and influencers. They require a good knowledge of regulated industries and legislative requirements to interpret the purpose of the brief and create an impactful campaign on behalf of the customer. Creatives lead projects from concept and ideas to completion, applying continuous improvement from internal and external feedback to ensure a successful outcome. Creatives must understand the perspectives and approach of each brief and/or campaign. They must determine, refine, and adapt the initial vision of a client, promoting diversity and inclusion within briefs. Most often, this is to drive sales of a product or service, but it can also be to initiate change for example for social good. They will utilise strategic planning, taking responsibility to develop appropriate courses of action that are capable of underpinning change to meet the needs of a brief. A creative will have the skills to understand the clients’ key drivers and to be able to professionally challenge a brief by exercising autonomy and judgement to achieve the best for the client.

A creative will always meet the brief and, where appropriate, suggest improvements based on informed research and evaluation to continuously develop and improve strategy. They must manage relationships through conflict and creative differences to achieve the best outcomes for clients. The creative either individually, or as part of a team, will develop ideas presenting them to their creative director or line manager for feedback. Creatives must manage competing demands and their time effectively- sometimes there will be weeks to develop ideas and sometimes just hours.

The creative will be expected to show that they can develop ideas that are omnichannel – this means that they are able to execute ideas on a range of platforms such as TV, radio, print, out of home promotion, social media, experiential (for example, publicity stunts, sampling, tasting), PR events and instore promotion. The creative will have a strong say on the ways their idea is executed, partly by choosing and or recommending artisans to work with for example photographers, illustrators and set designers. The creative will understand that their decisions may be influenced by budget and achieving value for money.

In their daily work this occupation interacts with many other departments inside their agency – if they work for an agency (see above). This will include creative services, strategy and client services. They are expected to present ideas to senior staff in their organisation, including the executive creative director, the client service director and the planning director. They may have contact with the client, either working directly with the client to drive improvements to the brief at the research stage and or presenting and pitching ideas. They could either work independently or as part of a team of creatives to generate ideas. In the production phase the creative may also initially be working with other artisans to achieve the communication of their idea.

The creative will work independently or as part of a team on the client’s brief. They will have review meetings with their line manager, but they will be expected to take responsibility for their work. They will lead work based on their advanced theoretic and practical knowledge utilising established frameworks and utilising tools to develop ideas. A creative will be responsible for managing their time on briefs. Agencies often invoice clients according to the time taken on work therefore a creative will maintain accurate records and evidence value for money. When working on a brief for a client, they will ensure that any ideas presented are within the tone of voice that is appropriate for that client. Refining their ideas through research to reflect the client brand. If they are working on a brief in a regulated category for example alcohol or gambling, they will be expected to ensure that any ideas presented are within the regulatory requirements. Creatives will be expected to represent their agency always reflecting professionalism and agency values.

Typical job titles include:

Advertising creative Art director Associate art director Copywriter Creative executive Digital brand and media specialist

Duties

  • Duty 1 Decode creative briefs to understand markets, drivers and blockers which impact deliverability. Providing strategic solutions to ensure a brief can be effectively delivered utilising success metrics.
  • Duty 2 Answering briefs taking them through the creative development process, collaborating and responding to feedback from stakeholders to ensure the client vision is achieved, leading each project from the start to the end of the process.
  • Duty 3 Providing, receiving and responding to feedback from internal and external stakeholders in the development process.
  • Duty 4 Manage competing demands whilst working on multiple creative briefs ensuring stakeholder and client objectives and agreed deadlines are met.
  • Duty 5 Liaise with appropriate internal and or external stakeholders to discover insights that will inform the development of ideas, briefs and pitches.
  • Duty 6 Establish and maintain positive relationships with internal and external customers, clients and other creatives to promote stakeholder engagement and achieve the vision of the brief.
  • Duty 7 Present developed ideas to stakeholders, as part of a pitch, to build confidence and trust that the brief has been met and will achieve agreed objectives and commercial success.
  • Duty 8 Manage workloads within given time frames using analytical, research and evaluation techniques such as six thinking hats and sticky thinking to identify ideas that could be further developed or improved that meet the client's vision.
  • Duty 9 Identify suitable specialists, for example photographers, animators and illustrators to work on the production of ideas. Express reasons why they are suitable. Supporting delivery if and when required.
  • Duty 10 Provide creative direction to help guide specialists that have been hired to fulfil briefs following the commissioning process.
  • Duty 11 Proactively develop ideas and take responsibility to achieve industry awards and or recognition that is integral to the client and sector to build brand and business awareness and commercial opportunities.
  • Duty 12 Identify and recognise new and emerging trends to ensure work is innovative and culturally relevant.
  • Duty 13 Ensure legislation and regulation requirements inform work where relevant.
  • Duty 14 Maintain accurate record keeping following in house processes for the recording of billed hours.
  • Duty 15 Follow organisational policies and procedures including for equality, diversity and inclusion.
  • Duty 16 Investing time in Continuous Professional Development including industry trends informing creative work.
  • Duty 17 Demonstrating professional and personal integrity representing yourself and the business.

Apprenticeship summary

ST1340, advertising creative level 6

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 24 months. The EPA period is typically 4 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence , you must submit a portfolio of evidence

Assessment methods



Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in advertising, marketing, branding agencies. Across a range of sectors as creatives are either employed in house or in commercial agencies. Creatives can work for agencies and social media owners. Agencies can support multinational corporations through to small & medium sized enterprises. They also work for media agencies, tech agencies and other businesses. There are an increasing number of larger brands who have in-house creative teams, such as Specsavers, Unilever and Barclays Bank and a creative may work directly for them. Creatives are most often hired in teams although some agencies hire single creatives. Some creatives will work on a freelance basis and undertake contract work. They will usually report to an Executive Creative Director, and they will usually receive briefs from creative services. The role of a creative is transferrable with skills valued across multiple sectors.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to develop strategic campaigns, or one-off pieces of communication, that meet a client brief. Creatives will need to influence stakeholders, working with many interconnecting sectors, partners and influencers. They require a good knowledge of regulated industries and legislative requirements to interpret the purpose of the brief and create an impactful campaign on behalf of the customer. Creatives lead projects from concept and ideas to completion, applying continuous improvement from internal and external feedback to ensure a successful outcome. Creatives must understand the perspectives and approach of each brief and/or campaign. They must determine, refine, and adapt the initial vision of a client, promoting diversity and inclusion within briefs. Most often, this is to drive sales of a product or service, but it can also be to initiate change for example for social good. They will utilise strategic planning, taking responsibility to develop appropriate courses of action that are capable of underpinning change to meet the needs of a brief. A creative will have the skills to understand the clients’ key drivers and to be able to professionally challenge a brief by exercising autonomy and judgement to achieve the best for the client.

A creative will always meet the brief and, where appropriate, suggest improvements based on informed research and evaluation to continuously develop and improve strategy. They must manage relationships through conflict and creative differences to achieve the best outcomes for clients. The creative either individually, or as part of a team, will develop ideas presenting them to their creative director or line manager for feedback. Creatives must manage competing demands and their time effectively- sometimes there will be weeks to develop ideas and sometimes just hours.

The creative will be expected to show that they can develop ideas that are omnichannel – this means that they are able to execute ideas on a range of platforms such as TV, radio, print, out of home promotion, social media, experiential (for example, publicity stunts, sampling, tasting), PR events and instore promotion. The creative will have a strong say on the ways their idea is executed, partly by choosing and or recommending artisans to work with for example photographers, illustrators and set designers. The creative will understand that their decisions may be influenced by budget and achieving value for money.

In their daily work this occupation interacts with many other departments inside their agency – if they work for an agency (see above). This will include creative services, strategy and client services. They are expected to present ideas to senior staff in their organisation, including the executive creative director, the client service director and the planning director. They may have contact with the client, either working directly with the client to drive improvements to the brief at the research stage and or presenting and pitching ideas. They could either work independently or as part of a team of creatives to generate ideas. In the production phase the creative may also initially be working with other artisans to achieve the communication of their idea.

The creative will work independently or as part of a team on the client’s brief. They will have review meetings with their line manager, but they will be expected to take responsibility for their work. They will lead work based on their advanced theoretic and practical knowledge utilising established frameworks and utilising tools to develop ideas. A creative will be responsible for managing their time on briefs. Agencies often invoice clients according to the time taken on work therefore a creative will maintain accurate records and evidence value for money. When working on a brief for a client, they will ensure that any ideas presented are within the tone of voice that is appropriate for that client. Refining their ideas through research to reflect the client brand. If they are working on a brief in a regulated category for example alcohol or gambling, they will be expected to ensure that any ideas presented are within the regulatory requirements. Creatives will be expected to represent their agency always reflecting professionalism and agency values.

Typical job titles include:

Advertising creative Art director Associate art director Copywriter Creative executive Digital brand and media specialist

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Decode creative briefs to understand markets, drivers and blockers which impact deliverability. Providing strategic solutions to ensure a brief can be effectively delivered utilising success metrics.

K5 K7 K24

S1 S3 S22 S24

B2

Duty 2 Answering briefs taking them through the creative development process, collaborating and responding to feedback from stakeholders to ensure the client vision is achieved, leading each project from the start to the end of the process.

K2 K3 K4 K24 K25

S2 S10

Duty 3 Providing, receiving and responding to feedback from internal and external stakeholders in the development process.

K1 K6 K7 K11 K24

S5

Duty 4 Manage competing demands whilst working on multiple creative briefs ensuring stakeholder and client objectives and agreed deadlines are met.

K6 K20

S4 S6

Duty 5 Liaise with appropriate internal and or external stakeholders to discover insights that will inform the development of ideas, briefs and pitches.

K1 K25

S24

Duty 6 Establish and maintain positive relationships with internal and external customers, clients and other creatives to promote stakeholder engagement and achieve the vision of the brief.

K1 K12 K22 K24 K25

S1 S7 S17

B5

Duty 7 Present developed ideas to stakeholders, as part of a pitch, to build confidence and trust that the brief has been met and will achieve agreed objectives and commercial success.

K13 K21

S7 S23 S24

Duty 8 Manage workloads within given time frames using analytical, research and evaluation techniques such as six thinking hats and sticky thinking to identify ideas that could be further developed or improved that meet the client's vision.

K16 K17 K23

S18 S21

B1

Duty 9 Identify suitable specialists, for example photographers, animators and illustrators to work on the production of ideas. Express reasons why they are suitable. Supporting delivery if and when required.

K11 K25

S16 S17

Duty 10 Provide creative direction to help guide specialists that have been hired to fulfil briefs following the commissioning process.

K12 K25

S8 S15

Duty 11 Proactively develop ideas and take responsibility to achieve industry awards and or recognition that is integral to the client and sector to build brand and business awareness and commercial opportunities.

K8 K9 K10

S9 S11 S14

Duty 12 Identify and recognise new and emerging trends to ensure work is innovative and culturally relevant.

K2 K4 K15 K19

S2 S3 S13 S24

B3

Duty 13 Ensure legislation and regulation requirements inform work where relevant.

K3 K4

S1 S2 S3

Duty 14 Maintain accurate record keeping following in house processes for the recording of billed hours.

K1 K12 K14

S6 S12

B1

Duty 15 Follow organisational policies and procedures including for equality, diversity and inclusion.

K3 K14 K15 K17

S20

B4 B6

Duty 16 Investing time in Continuous Professional Development including industry trends informing creative work.

K3 K4 K8 K15 K18 K19 K20

S19

B3

Duty 17 Demonstrating professional and personal integrity representing yourself and the business.

K11 K12 K15 K16 K17 K18 K20

B7 B8

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Functions, roles and skills within advertising, creative and professional bodies representing the industry. Back to Duty

K2: Media platforms and their formats including out of home adverts, TV adverts, radio adverts and social media adverts. Back to Duty

K3: Which categories of advertising are subject to legislation and regulation for example food & drink and gambling. How to access the latest regulation and legislation. Back to Duty

K4: Advertising History - recognise the differences in styles and periods in the story of advertising including that of notable historical and contemporary individual campaigns, which underpin current practices. Back to Duty

K5: Theories, frameworks for example "Get to Buy" and models of writing a creative brief. Back to Duty

K6: Prioritisation tools and techniques. Back to Duty

K7: Pre - idea research techniques, frameworks and post evaluation techniques informing work produced. Back to Duty

K8: Mainstream software, for example Adobe, to undertake image manipulation and design work including page layouts. Back to Duty

K9: Visual language including semiotics, colour and typography to adhere to brand guidelines. Back to Duty

K10: How to use templates and grids to create work that fits the format. Back to Duty

K11: Where to find creatives, to support work for example illustrators, animators, set designers. Back to Duty

K12: Commissioning and creative management process for employing third party creatives to work on a project. Back to Duty

K13: Performance metrics and how they can be used to measure creative brief objectives. Back to Duty

K14: Organisational policies and procedures including sustainability, health & safety and equality, diversity & inclusion. Back to Duty

K15: Ethical and cultural values which influences the work produced for the target audience. Back to Duty

K16: End to end workflow and planning process, the key stages including post-production and own role and responsibilities within this. Back to Duty

K17: Communication techniques, and approaches to interact with stakeholders. Back to Duty

K18: Where to source career professional development. Back to Duty

K19: Emerging digital trends, and how these can be embedded in professional practice. Back to Duty

K20: Approaches to managing and marketing own skills and services. Back to Duty

K21: Presentation techniques to use in different settings for example in person, online or recorded which is appropriate for different audiences. Back to Duty

K22: Negotiation and influencing models and techniques. Back to Duty

K23: Frameworks to evaluate ideas including Six Thinking Hats, Three C's and Sticky Thinking. Back to Duty

K24: Communication techniques for interacting with colleagues to decode creative briefs. Back to Duty

K25: Recognise the differences in creative skills to meet creative brief objectives. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Work with colleagues to decode and understand the client brief. Back to Duty

S2: Research client' audiences; understanding personas developing ideas for the target market. Back to Duty

S3: Utilising research to inform work including research of business products, services and competition. Back to Duty

S4: Work within given time frames utilizing evaluation techniques to identify ideas. Back to Duty

S5: Rationalise ideas through the utilisation of frameworks and research techniques. Back to Duty

S6: Use prioritisation tools for example priority matrix to manage workload, and deliver against brief objectives. Back to Duty

S7: Present ideas using methods appropriate for the audience including using mock ups to stakeholders and colleagues. Back to Duty

S8: Uses creative skills to execute the idea to meet the creative brief. Work produced may be co-produced or self - developed. Back to Duty

S9: Use digital tools and collaborative platforms for example adobe to develop ideas and executions on a client briefs. Back to Duty

S10: Insights into the brand, so that the brand identity is reflected in work produced. Back to Duty

S11: Archiving a body of your work showcasing the latest, challenging and outstanding practice. Aiming to increase profile within the communications industry of both the individual and organisation. Back to Duty

S12: Maintaining own accurate records for timesheets for best value for the client. Back to Duty

S13: Identify and recognise new and emerging trends to inform the relevance of the work. Back to Duty

S14: Utilising the opportunities to pursue industry awards individually or collectively as part of a team for example D&AD and Creative Circle. Back to Duty

S15: Creative ownership to enhance work ensuring client's briefs are achieved to their satisfaction. Back to Duty

S16: Identify and justify suitable specialists, for example photographers, animators and illustrators to work on the production of ideas. Back to Duty

S17: Establish and maintain positive relationships with internal and external stakeholders for example suppliers, clients and customers. Back to Duty

S18: Knows how to facilitate a creative brainstorming exercise and can do so on their own, in teams or in groups. Back to Duty

S19: Maintains a professional network enabling self promotion within the industry. Back to Duty

S20: Utilising policies and procedures including sustainability, health & safety and equality, diversity & inclusion in work. Back to Duty

S21: Frameworks to evaluate individual creative ideas or those generated as part of a team. Back to Duty

S22: Evaluates the creative brief, checking for any missing information and clarifying the outcomes in order to achieve creative brief objectives. Back to Duty

S23: Use performance metrics information to change work accordingly. Back to Duty

S24: Produce work that respects the ethical and cultural values of the audience. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Takes personal responsibility for ensuring agreed deadlines are met. Back to Duty

B2: Curiosity to ask questions to achieve briefs. Back to Duty

B3: Seek learning opportunities and continuous professional development to improve practice. Back to Duty

B4: Promotion of equity, diversity and inclusion in creative work. Back to Duty

B5: Work collaboratively with others across the organisation and external stakeholders. Back to Duty

B6: Take responsibility of own obligations for sustainable practice, welfare issues and health and safety. Back to Duty

B7: Take responsibility for ethical principles and consequences of work. Back to Duty

B8: Motivated and resilient to challenging situations. Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.0

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the advertising creative apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Advertising creative apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

A full-time advertising creative apprentice typically spends 24 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway). The apprentice must spend at least 12 months on-programme and complete the required amount of off-the-job training in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must complete their training and meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA. The EPA will assess occupational competence.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are below.

Assessment method 1 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence :

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - project with presentation and questioning :

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail

  • pass

  • merit

  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 24 months

The apprentice must:

  • complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) outlined in this apprenticeship’s occupational standard
  • complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • compile a portfolio of evidence

End-point assessment gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the apprenticeship.

The apprentice must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

For the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence , the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to their EPAO, including any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 4 months

The grades available for each assessment method are below

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence :

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Project with presentation and questioning :

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 4 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the apprenticeship. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider, but the employer must make the decision. The apprentice will then enter the gateway.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

They must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • submit a portfolio of evidence for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 25 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

The portfolio of evidence would need to include evidence that the apprentice had entered their work for industry award(s) either on an individual basis or as part of a team.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records, for example:
  • workplace policies and procedures
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total 15 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the professional discussion. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the professional discussion. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to their EPAO, including any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the professional discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

It provides the apprentice with the opportunity to discuss and show case their depth of understanding against the knowledge, skills and behaviours that may not naturally occur as part of the scenario based project.

Allows the independent assessor to consider the context and sector that the apprentice operates within, giving flexibility to ensure that all the KSBs can be assessed appropriately.

The professional discussion is cost effective, and it allows consideration of the potential need to conduct the EPA remotely.

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the professional discussion.


The purpose is to assess the apprentice’s competence against the following themes:

Working on briefs

Making the work

Professional practice

Organisational responsibilities

The EPAO must give an apprentice 2 weeks' notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 4 weeks to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however, the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 90 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 8 questions. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises.

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence :

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Project with presentation and questioning

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that enables the apprentice to show how they react to a creative brief, interpret information and present their findings. The project must be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • project with a project output; artefact

  • presentation with questions and answers

Together, these components give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. They are assessed by an independent assessor.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

The project is the most valid method as it allows the demonstration of professional competence. Producing an artefact and presentation reflects normal professional practice for an Advertising Creative, so this assessment method is appropriate.

It replicates the requirement to interpret briefs, develop proposals and pitch ideas and be concise and precise in their use of language in written and verbal communication and demonstrate clarity of thought to engage others.

It will enable the demonstration of knowledge, skills and behaviours through the interpretation of the creative brief, creation and pitching/delivery of the presentation.

It is a holistic assessment method, its enables knowledge, skills and behaviours to be tested along with their depth of understanding.

The end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) will set the creative brief for the apprentice at gateway. Due to commercial confidentiality the apprentice may not be able to utilise real life examples. Also real life briefs may also not be available for every apprentice at gateway. As the end-point assessment organisation is setting the creative brief this will ensure valid, reliable and consistent assessment.

Delivery

The apprentice must complete a project based on any of the following:

A new idea of a product or service.

  • An opportunity for a product or service to enter a new market
  • Initiating social change
  • To increase sales of a product or service
  • To increase brand awareness

The creative brief must include:

  • Business problem, aim or objective the brief must meet
  • The budget and target audience
  • Branding requirements
  • Consideration for regulation and legislation
  • Provide the opportunity to showcase visuals of creative ideas
  • Justifications for choosing advertising channels
  • The opportunity for the apprentice to detail how, why and what media they would use in a campaign
  • The apprentice will produce an artefact in response to the creative brief and present their approach and justification to answering the creative brief.

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO must sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

The project output must be in the form of an artefact and presentation.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within the project period, to plan and complete their project.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project, which could include internal colleagues or technical experts. The apprentice must however, complete their artefact and presentation unaided and they must be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm this when the artefact and any presentation materials are completed.

Component 1: Artefact

The artefact must include at least:

The completed artefact output would be a response to the creative brief. The apprentice must produce two artefacts from the list below.

Below is a list of what the artefact could be:

  • Social media campaign including three posts one of these must be a video. The video should be between 10 and 30 seconds long. The posts cannot exceed the platform's character limit.
  • Film commercial minimum of 30 seconds long to a maximum of 2 minutes.

  • Out of home adverts. The apprentice must produce 4-5 adverts and could include billboards (poster, mobile or digital). Bus shelters (poster or digital). Murals or street furniture.
  • Audio commercial for example streaming service or radio. Minimum of 30 seconds to a maximum of 60 seconds.

The apprentice must complete the artefact by the end of week 3 of the EPA period. The artefact must be sent to the EPAO. It will be reviewed by the independent assessor prior to meeting the apprentice. The apprentice must produce and include mapping, showing how the artefact evidences the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Component 2: Presentation with questions

The presentation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The apprentice must prepare and deliver a presentation to an independent assessor. After the presentation, the independent assessor must ask questions.

The presentation should cover:

  • an overview of what was required by the creative brief
  • findings from research including target audience data
  • the project scope (including key performance indicators)
  • analysis of barriers to creating the finalised artefact including regulations and barriers
  • summary of actions undertaken by the apprentice to include meeting budget requirements, justification of selected advertising channels
  • processes to generate ideas and finalise ideas for the artefact for example they should include ideas generated, any drafts or mock ups of potential images, designs, and concepts
  • project outcomes and how these were achieved

The presentation with questions must last 50 minutes. This will typically include a presentation of 20 minutes and questioning lasting 30 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the presentation and questioning by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete their last point or respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is:

  • to verify that the activity was completed by the apprentice
  • to seek clarification where required
  • to assess those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to demonstrate with the artefact, although these should be kept to a minimum
  • to assess level of competence against the grading descriptors

The apprentice must submit any presentation materials to the EPAO by the end of week 6 of the EPA period. The apprentice must notify the EPAO, at that point, of any technical requirements for the presentation.

During the presentation, the apprentice must have access to:

  • audio-visual presentation equipment
  • flip chart and writing and drawing materials
  • computer

The independent assessor must have at least 2 weeks to review the artefact and presentation materials, to allow them to prepare questions.

The apprentice must be given at least 2 weeks’ notice of the presentation with questions.

Assessment decisions

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. They must assess the project components holistically when deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs demonstrated in the artefact and presentation with questions
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

Assessment locations

The presentation and question and answer session must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises. It should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The question and answer session can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAO must produce the following materials to support the project:

  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Grading

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Working on briefs
K2 K5 K13 K16 K17 K23 S18 S21 S23 B2

Explains the impact of different media platforms and formats used on adverts. (K2) 

Articulates their own role and responsibilities within end to end workflow, planning processes and the key stages of post - production. (K16)

Explains how they apply theories, frameworks and models to write a creative brief. (K5)

Explains the different communication techniques and approaches used with stakeholders, and when facilitating creative brainstorming on their own, in teams or groups. (K17, S18)

Provides examples where they ask questions and use frameworks to evaluate ideas to achieve briefs. (K23, S21, B2)

Explains how they apply performance metrics to justify changes made to improve the work. (S23, K13)

Evaluates the impact of communication techniques and approaches used when facilitating creative brainstorming on their own, in teams or groups. (K17, S18)

 

Making the work
K8 K10 K11 K12 S15 S16 S17 B5

Explains how they apply mainstream software to manipulate images, design work and page layouts. (K8)

Analyses the use of creative ownership to create and enhance work that meets clients brief, including the use of templates and grids that fits required format. (K10, S15)

Explains how they commission and use the creative management process for identifying and justifying suitable specialists and employing third party creatives to work on the production of ideas. (K11, K12, S16)

Explains how they establish and actively maintain positive relationships to work collaboratively with internal and external stakeholders. (S17, B5)

 

 

 

Evaluates the positive impact of using the creative management process for finding and employing specialists and third party creatives to work on a project and production of ideas. (K11, K12, S16)

 

 

Professional practice
K1 K4 K18 K20 S11 S14 S19 B3

Analyses the history of advertising and provides examples of differences in styles and periods in the story of advertising including that of notable historical and contemporary individual campaigns which underpin current practices. (K4)

 

Explains how they manage and market their own skills and services and utilises opportunities within industry awards individually or collectively. (K20, S14)

 

Explains the function, roles and skills within advertising, creative and professional industry bodies. Give examples how they have archived a body of their work that showcases best practice in order to increase their own profile and that of the organisation within the communications industry. (K1, S11)  

 

Explains the sources that they have utilised for their own professional development and self-promotion within the industry. (K18, S19,B3)

 

 

Explains the impact that their sources have had on their own professional development and self-promotion within the industry. (K18, S19)

 

 

Organisational responsibilities
K14 S12 S20 B4 B6

Explains how they apply organisational policies and procedures to health and safety, equality, diversity, and inclusion in work, and the use of sustainable work practices. (K14, S20, B4, B6)

Explains the importance of maintaining accurate timesheets on achieving best value for their own client. (S12)

 

 

 

None

Project with presentation and questioning

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Working on briefs
K6 K7 K24 S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S22 B1

Uses prioritisation tools and techniques to manage workload and deliver against the brief objectives and deadlines. (K6, S6, B1)

Identifies and selects research techniques, frameworks and post evaluation techniques to inform their work on the business products, services, competition and client audiences when developing ideas for the target market. (K7, S2, S3)

Demonstrates the use of frameworks, research and evaluation techniques to identify and justify ideas within a given time frame. (S4, S5)

Collaborates with colleagues and client to evaluate and understand the client brief to achieve client outcomes. (S1, S22, K24)

 

 

 

 

Evaluates their prioritisation of workload and the extent to which objectives were delivered. (K6, S6)

 

 

Making the work
K9 K19 K21 K25 S7 S8 S9 S10 S13 B7

Takes responsibility and applies ethical principles in the use of semiotics, colour and typography when ensuring that the brand identity is reflected in work produced. (K9, S10, B7)

Uses creative skills to execute the idea to meet the creative brief, by co-producing or self - developing the work. (S8, K25)

Selects and uses techniques appropriate for the setting and audience to present ideas, including the use of mock ups to stakeholders and colleagues. (K21, S7)

Identifies emerging digital trends and uses digital tools and collaborative platforms to develop ideas to meet client briefs. (K19, S9, S13)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluates the impact of using emerging digital trends and digital tools and collaborative platforms to develop ideas to meet client briefs. (K19, S9, S13)

 

 

Professional practice
K3 K22 B8

Undertakes all work in accordance with regulations and legislation. (K3)

Applies negotiation and influencing models and techniques to challenging situations. (K22, B8)

 

 

 

None

Organisational responsibilities
K15 S24

Undertakes all work with consideration of the ethical and cultural values for the intended audience. (K15, S24)

 

 

Evaluates the impact of not following ethical values for the culture the work is being made for. (K15, S24)

 

 

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the overall grade of:

  • fail

  • pass

  • merit

  • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence and project with presentation and questioning in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they will be awarded an overall fail.

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. The professional discussion and creative brief.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Project with presentation and questioning Overall Grading
Fail Fail Fail
Pass Fail Fail
Fail Pass Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Merit
Pass Distinction Merit
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does. The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and the EPAO should agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 5 months of the EPA outcome notification.

If the apprentice fails the project assessment method, they must amend the project output in line with the independent assessor’s feedback. The apprentice will be given 3 weeks to rework and submit the amended artefact.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • prepare for and undertake the EPA including meeting all gateway requirements
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner
  • provide access to any employer-specific documentation as required for example, company policies
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows appropriate opportunity for the apprentice to meet the KSBs
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete the EPA
  • ensure that any required supervision during the EPA period, as stated within this EPA plan, is in place
  • ensure the apprentice has access to the resources used to fulfil their role and carry out the EPA for workplace based assessments
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the RoEPAO
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP)
  • understand the apprenticeship including the occupational standard, EPA plan and funding
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material)
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence. This must ensure, as a minimum, there is no personal benefit or detriment for those delivering the EPA or from the result of an assessment. It must cover:
    • apprentices
    • employers
    • independent assessors
    • any other roles involved in delivery or grading of the EPA
  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent assessment and maintain records of internal quality assurance (IQA) activity for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • appoint independent, competent, and suitably qualified assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan
  • appoint administrators, invigilators and any other roles where required to facilitate the EPA
  • deliver induction, initial and on-going training for all their independent assessors and any other roles involved in the delivery or grading of the EPA as specified within this EPA plan. This should include how to record the rationale and evidence for grading decisions where required
  • conduct standardisation with all their independent assessors before allowing them to deliver an EPA, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • conduct moderation of all their independent assessors decisions once EPAs have started
  • monitor the performance of all their independent assessors and provide re-training where necessary
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • arrange for the EPA to take place in a timely manner, in consultation with the employer
  • provide information, advice, and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • confirm the gateway requirements have been met before they start the EPA for an apprentice
  • host and facilitate the EPA or make suitable alternative arrangements
  • maintain the security of the EPA including, but not limited to, verifying the identity of the apprentice, invigilation and security of materials
  • where the EPA plan permits assessment away from the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary
  • confirm overall grade awarded
  • arrange the certification of the apprenticeship
  • maintain and apply a policy for conducting appeals

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must:

  • be independent, with no conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider, specifically, they must not receive a personal benefit or detriment from the result of the assessment
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation
  • have the competence to assess the EPA and meet the requirements of the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the apprenticeship’s occupational standard and EPA plan
  • attend induction and standardisation events before they conduct an EPA for the first time, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • use language in the delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • work with other personnel, including additional assessors where used, in the preparation and delivery of assessment methods
  • conduct the EPA to assess the apprentice against the KSBs and in line with the EPA plan
  • make final grading decisions in line with this EPA plan
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • comply with external quality assurance (EQA) requirements

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must:

  • conform to the requirements of the register of apprenticeship training providers (RoATP)
  • ensure procedures are in place to mitigate against any conflict of interest
  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard
  • deliver training to the apprentice as outlined in their apprenticeship agreement
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to the strategies, policies and procedures that an EPAO must have in place to ensure valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions.

EPAOs for this EPA must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities table.

They must also appoint independent assessors who:

  • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 7 gained in the last 5 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
  • meet the following minimum requirements:

    occupational experience in a related creative occupation having worked for an integrated agency.

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • completing applicable assessment methods online (for example computer-based assessment)
  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • using the employer’s premises

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship is not aligned to professional recognition.

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Functions, roles and skills within advertising, creative and professional bodies representing the industry.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K2

Media platforms and their formats including out of home adverts, TV adverts, radio adverts and social media adverts.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K3

Which categories of advertising are subject to legislation and regulation for example food & drink and gambling. How to access the latest regulation and legislation.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K4

Advertising History - recognise the differences in styles and periods in the story of advertising including that of notable historical and contemporary individual campaigns, which underpin current practices.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K5

Theories, frameworks for example "Get to Buy" and models of writing a creative brief.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K6

Prioritisation tools and techniques.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K7

Pre - idea research techniques, frameworks and post evaluation techniques informing work produced.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K8

Mainstream software, for example Adobe, to undertake image manipulation and design work including page layouts.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K9

Visual language including semiotics, colour and typography to adhere to brand guidelines.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K10

How to use templates and grids to create work that fits the format.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K11

Where to find creatives, to support work for example illustrators, animators, set designers.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K12

Commissioning and creative management process for employing third party creatives to work on a project.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K13

Performance metrics and how they can be used to measure creative brief objectives.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K14

Organisational policies and procedures including sustainability, health & safety and equality, diversity & inclusion.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K15

Ethical and cultural values which influences the work produced for the target audience.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K16

End to end workflow and planning process, the key stages including post-production and own role and responsibilities within this.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K17

Communication techniques, and approaches to interact with stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K18

Where to source career professional development.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19

Emerging digital trends, and how these can be embedded in professional practice.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K20

Approaches to managing and marketing own skills and services.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K21

Presentation techniques to use in different settings for example in person, online or recorded which is appropriate for different audiences.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K22

Negotiation and influencing models and techniques.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K23

Frameworks to evaluate ideas including Six Thinking Hats, Three C's and Sticky Thinking.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K24

Communication techniques for interacting with colleagues to decode creative briefs.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K25

Recognise the differences in creative skills to meet creative brief objectives.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Work with colleagues to decode and understand the client brief.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S2

Research client' audiences; understanding personas developing ideas for the target market.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S3

Utilising research to inform work including research of business products, services and competition.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S4

Work within given time frames utilizing evaluation techniques to identify ideas.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S5

Rationalise ideas through the utilisation of frameworks and research techniques.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S6

Use prioritisation tools for example priority matrix to manage workload, and deliver against brief objectives.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S7

Present ideas using methods appropriate for the audience including using mock ups to stakeholders and colleagues.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S8

Uses creative skills to execute the idea to meet the creative brief. Work produced may be co-produced or self - developed.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S9

Use digital tools and collaborative platforms for example adobe to develop ideas and executions on a client briefs.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S10

Insights into the brand, so that the brand identity is reflected in work produced.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S11

Archiving a body of your work showcasing the latest, challenging and outstanding practice. Aiming to increase profile within the communications industry of both the individual and organisation.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12

Maintaining own accurate records for timesheets for best value for the client.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S13

Identify and recognise new and emerging trends to inform the relevance of the work.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S14

Utilising the opportunities to pursue industry awards individually or collectively as part of a team for example D&AD and Creative Circle.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S15

Creative ownership to enhance work ensuring client's briefs are achieved to their satisfaction.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S16

Identify and justify suitable specialists, for example photographers, animators and illustrators to work on the production of ideas.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S17

Establish and maintain positive relationships with internal and external stakeholders for example suppliers, clients and customers.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S18

Knows how to facilitate a creative brainstorming exercise and can do so on their own, in teams or in groups.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S19

Maintains a professional network enabling self promotion within the industry.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S20

Utilising policies and procedures including sustainability, health & safety and equality, diversity & inclusion in work.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S21

Frameworks to evaluate individual creative ideas or those generated as part of a team.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S22

Evaluates the creative brief, checking for any missing information and clarifying the outcomes in order to achieve creative brief objectives.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S23

Use performance metrics information to change work accordingly.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S24

Produce work that respects the ethical and cultural values of the audience.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Takes personal responsibility for ensuring agreed deadlines are met.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
B2

Curiosity to ask questions to achieve briefs.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3

Seek learning opportunities and continuous professional development to improve practice.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B4

Promotion of equity, diversity and inclusion in creative work.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B5

Work collaboratively with others across the organisation and external stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B6

Take responsibility of own obligations for sustainable practice, welfare issues and health and safety.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B7

Take responsibility for ethical principles and consequences of work.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
B8

Motivated and resilient to challenging situations.

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Working on briefs
K2 K5 K13 K16 K17 K23
S18 S21 S23
B2

Media platforms and their formats including out of home adverts, TV adverts, radio adverts and social media adverts. (K2)

Theories, frameworks for example "Get to Buy" and models of writing a creative brief. (K5)

Performance metrics and how they can be used to measure creative brief objectives. (K13)

End to end workflow and planning process, the key stages including post-production and own role and responsibilities within this. (K16)

Communication techniques, and approaches to interact with stakeholders. (K17)

Frameworks to evaluate ideas including Six Thinking Hats, Three C's and Sticky Thinking. (K23)

Knows how to facilitate a creative brainstorming exercise and can do so on their own, in teams or in groups. (S18)

Frameworks to evaluate individual creative ideas or those generated as part of a team. (S21)

Use performance metrics information to change work accordingly. (S23)

Curiosity to ask questions to achieve briefs. (B2)

Making the work
K8 K10 K11 K12
S15 S16 S17
B5

Mainstream software, for example Adobe, to undertake image manipulation and design work including page layouts. (K8)

How to use templates and grids to create work that fits the format. (K10)

Where to find creatives, to support work for example illustrators, animators, set designers. (K11)

Commissioning and creative management process for employing third party creatives to work on a project. (K12)

Creative ownership to enhance work ensuring client's briefs are achieved to their satisfaction. (S15)

Identify and justify suitable specialists, for example photographers, animators and illustrators to work on the production of ideas. (S16)

Establish and maintain positive relationships with internal and external stakeholders for example suppliers, clients and customers. (S17)

Work collaboratively with others across the organisation and external stakeholders. (B5)

Professional practice
K1 K4 K18 K20
S11 S14 S19
B3

Functions, roles and skills within advertising, creative and professional bodies representing the industry. (K1)

Advertising History - recognise the differences in styles and periods in the story of advertising including that of notable historical and contemporary individual campaigns, which underpin current practices. (K4)

Where to source career professional development. (K18)

Approaches to managing and marketing own skills and services. (K20)

Archiving a body of your work showcasing the latest, challenging and outstanding practice. Aiming to increase profile within the communications industry of both the individual and organisation. (S11)

Utilising the opportunities to pursue industry awards individually or collectively as part of a team for example D&AD and Creative Circle. (S14)

Maintains a professional network enabling self promotion within the industry. (S19)

Seek learning opportunities and continuous professional development to improve practice. (B3)

Organisational responsibilities
K14
S12 S20
B4 B6

Organisational policies and procedures including sustainability, health & safety and equality, diversity & inclusion. (K14)

Maintaining own accurate records for timesheets for best value for the client. (S12)

Utilising policies and procedures including sustainability, health & safety and equality, diversity & inclusion in work. (S20)

Promotion of equity, diversity and inclusion in creative work. (B4)

Take responsibility of own obligations for sustainable practice, welfare issues and health and safety. (B6)

Project with presentation and questioning

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Working on briefs
K6 K7 K24
S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S22
B1

Prioritisation tools and techniques. (K6)

Pre - idea research techniques, frameworks and post evaluation techniques informing work produced. (K7)

Communication techniques for interacting with colleagues to decode creative briefs. (K24)

Work with colleagues to decode and understand the client brief. (S1)

Research client' audiences; understanding personas developing ideas for the target market. (S2)

Utilising research to inform work including research of business products, services and competition. (S3)

Work within given time frames utilizing evaluation techniques to identify ideas. (S4)

Rationalise ideas through the utilisation of frameworks and research techniques. (S5)

Use prioritisation tools for example priority matrix to manage workload, and deliver against brief objectives. (S6)

Evaluates the creative brief, checking for any missing information and clarifying the outcomes in order to achieve creative brief objectives. (S22)

Takes personal responsibility for ensuring agreed deadlines are met. (B1)

Making the work
K9 K19 K21 K25
S7 S8 S9 S10 S13
B7

Visual language including semiotics, colour and typography to adhere to brand guidelines. (K9)

Emerging digital trends, and how these can be embedded in professional practice. (K19)

Presentation techniques to use in different settings for example in person, online or recorded which is appropriate for different audiences. (K21)

Recognise the differences in creative skills to meet creative brief objectives. (K25)

Present ideas using methods appropriate for the audience including using mock ups to stakeholders and colleagues. (S7)

Uses creative skills to execute the idea to meet the creative brief. Work produced may be co-produced or self - developed. (S8)

Use digital tools and collaborative platforms for example adobe to develop ideas and executions on a client briefs. (S9)

Insights into the brand, so that the brand identity is reflected in work produced. (S10)

Identify and recognise new and emerging trends to inform the relevance of the work. (S13)

Take responsibility for ethical principles and consequences of work. (B7)

Professional practice
K3 K22

B8

Which categories of advertising are subject to legislation and regulation for example food & drink and gambling. How to access the latest regulation and legislation. (K3)

Negotiation and influencing models and techniques. (K22)

None

Motivated and resilient to challenging situations. (B8)

Organisational responsibilities
K15
S24

Ethical and cultural values which influences the work produced for the target audience. (K15)

Produce work that respects the ethical and cultural values of the audience. (S24)

None

Employers involved in creating the standard: Havas, Krow (Mission Group), Denstu McGarry Bowen, VCCP, JKR, MD Grey UK, Grayling, Wavemaker, SCA (School of Communication Arts)

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.0 Approved for delivery 24/11/2023 Not set Not set

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