Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0209
  3. Version: 1.1
  4. Level: 2
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 24 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Maximum funding: £8000
  8. Route: Agriculture, environmental and animal care
  9. Date updated: 01/11/2023
  10. Approved for delivery: 26 March 2015
  11. Lars code: 21
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual
  13. Example progression routes:
  14. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
Print apprenticeship summary

Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Caring for the overall appearance of a golf course, maintaining a good quality playing surface and ensuring a challenging and enjoyable experience for golfers.

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in a wide range of golf courses and a broad variety of golf course settings which are open and maintained all year round.  

Golf greenkeepers spend most of their time working outdoors. They work in all seasons and can work in a variety of settings. They may be employed on golf courses such as a links golf course along the coast, or they may work inland on a parkland, downland or a heathland course. All golf courses have an outdoor space environment which will support health and wellbeing. 

Golf courses throughout the country can be members clubs, often run and owned by the members or committees.  Alternatively, they can be, private, public or municipal courses, owned and/or managed by individuals, companies or a local authority. 

Golf clubs can range in size and stature, from championship courses and venues that host large tournaments through to smaller, local courses serving the local community.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to improve and maintain good quality playing surfaces and ensure the golf course offers a consistent challenge and an enjoyable experience for golfers.

Golf greenkeepers typically begin work early in the morning and are responsible for the overall preparation, maintenance and management of the golf course. The greenkeeping team will maintain the course 365 days a year and whilst golfers are at play and members of the public are on the golf course.

There are four key turfgrass areas on a golf course; greens, tees, fairways and areas of rough, each of which requires a different type of maintenance. Golf greenkeepers also manage habitats and areas of biodiversity found on golf courses.

On a day to day basis, they will prepare and maintain the golf course ready for play, to the highest possible standard. They will be responsible for marking out areas and setting out equipment as well as maintaining golf course hazards, in line with the Rules of Golf and the employer’s requirements.

The golf greenkeeper is responsible for looking after all aspects of turf management. This can involve a range of tasks such as preparing the ground by monitoring soil and plant health to establish turf and plants; renovating and repairing turf surfaces; carrying out appropriate maintenance regimes such as mowing, aeration and top dressing; controlling weeds, pests, diseases and disorders on the golf course, through to preparing, using and maintaining golf course equipment and machines.

The golf greenkeeper may be involved in the construction, renovation, maintenance and presentation of bunkers.

They will be able to maintain irrigation and drainage to the standards required to ensure appropriate soil conditions and playability.

They may be required to maintain lakes, ponds, ditches, waterways and other golf course hazards.

They may also be involved in environmental and ecological operations which may include planting turf, trees, shrubs and developing wildlife habitats.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders. They might typically report to an advanced or head greenkeeper, golf course manager, general manager, golf course owner or a committee. On a daily basis, the greenkeeper will interact with visitors, golfers and colleagues in the greenkeeping team and golf club. They may be required to liaise with contractors, the general public, golfing bodies, suppliers and delivery personnel.

The daily maintenance of the golf course is carried out by the greenkeepers whilst golfers are at play.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for the overall maintenance, care and appearance of the golf course. They are required to adopt sound ecological practices, adapt to seasonal conditions and meet the employer’s requirements and the Rules of Golf.

They are required to use and maintain a range of grounds maintenance machinery and equipment safely. They must adopt safe and sustainable working practices on the golf course by observing relevant environmental, health and safety regulations and legislations and adhering to the golf club’s policies and procedures.

They know when, how and why the range of maintenance operations are carried out at different times of the year to achieve optimum playability and player satisfaction.

The greenkeeper may work alone or as part of a team and in all weather conditions. They have the autonomy to carry out specific maintenance across a large area and will typically report to a line manager or a head greenkeeper.

Typical job titles include:

Golf greenkeeper

Duties

  • Duty 1 Maintain golf greens, tees, fairways, surrounds, approaches and areas of rough and semi rough.
  • Duty 2 Prepare the golf course for play, in line with the Rules of Golf and employer’s requirements.
  • Duty 3 Prepare and setup golf course equipment to achieve required outcomes (e.g. hole changing equipment, bunker rakes, Stimpmeters).
  • Duty 4 Prepare the ground and establish turf and plants around the golf course and clubhouse.
  • Duty 5 Identify and control weeds, pests, diseases and turf disorders on the golf course playing surfaces.
  • Duty 6 Renovate and repair turf surfaces such as golf greens, tees, fairways and areas of rough.
  • Duty 7 Maintain and renovate bunkers.
  • Duty 8 Maintain and renovate non turf areas such as pathways, penalty areas (e.g. water hazards, ditches).
  • Duty 9 Apply materials such as fertilisers, top dressing and seed across areas of the golf course.
  • Duty 10 Support the operation and maintenance of golf course drainage and irrigation systems.
  • Duty 11 Maintain wildlife habitats and environmentally sensitive areas within the golf course.
  • Duty 12 Collect information on golf course conditions and playability. Report information to team members and supervisors.
  • Duty 13 Prepare, setup and use golf course machinery to achieve required outcomes.
  • Duty 14 Carry out routine maintenance of golf equipment and machinery in line with organisational requirements and manufacturers' instructions. Report any faults to relevant team member.
  • Duty 15 Keep up to date with advances in golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies and maintain continuous professional development (CPD).

Apprenticeship summary

ST0209, golf greenkeeper level 2

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 24 months. The EPA period is typically 3 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the professional discussion, you must submit a portfolio of evidence

Assessment methods




Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.


Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with The British & International Golf Greenkeepers Association (BIGGA). Completion of the apprenticeship will enable qualified apprentices to apply for full membership

Please contact the professional body for more details.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in a wide range of golf courses and a broad variety of golf course settings which are open and maintained all year round.  

Golf greenkeepers spend most of their time working outdoors. They work in all seasons and can work in a variety of settings. They may be employed on golf courses such as a links golf course along the coast, or they may work inland on a parkland, downland or a heathland course. All golf courses have an outdoor space environment which will support health and wellbeing. 

Golf courses throughout the country can be members clubs, often run and owned by the members or committees.  Alternatively, they can be, private, public or municipal courses, owned and/or managed by individuals, companies or a local authority. 

Golf clubs can range in size and stature, from championship courses and venues that host large tournaments through to smaller, local courses serving the local community.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to improve and maintain good quality playing surfaces and ensure the golf course offers a consistent challenge and an enjoyable experience for golfers.

Golf greenkeepers typically begin work early in the morning and are responsible for the overall preparation, maintenance and management of the golf course. The greenkeeping team will maintain the course 365 days a year and whilst golfers are at play and members of the public are on the golf course.

There are four key turfgrass areas on a golf course; greens, tees, fairways and areas of rough, each of which requires a different type of maintenance. Golf greenkeepers also manage habitats and areas of biodiversity found on golf courses.

On a day to day basis, they will prepare and maintain the golf course ready for play, to the highest possible standard. They will be responsible for marking out areas and setting out equipment as well as maintaining golf course hazards, in line with the Rules of Golf and the employer’s requirements.

The golf greenkeeper is responsible for looking after all aspects of turf management. This can involve a range of tasks such as preparing the ground by monitoring soil and plant health to establish turf and plants; renovating and repairing turf surfaces; carrying out appropriate maintenance regimes such as mowing, aeration and top dressing; controlling weeds, pests, diseases and disorders on the golf course, through to preparing, using and maintaining golf course equipment and machines.

The golf greenkeeper may be involved in the construction, renovation, maintenance and presentation of bunkers.

They will be able to maintain irrigation and drainage to the standards required to ensure appropriate soil conditions and playability.

They may be required to maintain lakes, ponds, ditches, waterways and other golf course hazards.

They may also be involved in environmental and ecological operations which may include planting turf, trees, shrubs and developing wildlife habitats.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders. They might typically report to an advanced or head greenkeeper, golf course manager, general manager, golf course owner or a committee. On a daily basis, the greenkeeper will interact with visitors, golfers and colleagues in the greenkeeping team and golf club. They may be required to liaise with contractors, the general public, golfing bodies, suppliers and delivery personnel.

The daily maintenance of the golf course is carried out by the greenkeepers whilst golfers are at play.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for the overall maintenance, care and appearance of the golf course. They are required to adopt sound ecological practices, adapt to seasonal conditions and meet the employer’s requirements and the Rules of Golf.

They are required to use and maintain a range of grounds maintenance machinery and equipment safely. They must adopt safe and sustainable working practices on the golf course by observing relevant environmental, health and safety regulations and legislations and adhering to the golf club’s policies and procedures.

They know when, how and why the range of maintenance operations are carried out at different times of the year to achieve optimum playability and player satisfaction.

The greenkeeper may work alone or as part of a team and in all weather conditions. They have the autonomy to carry out specific maintenance across a large area and will typically report to a line manager or a head greenkeeper.

Typical job titles include:

Golf greenkeeper

Entry requirements

Entry requirements will be determined by individual employers. Typically apprentices may have a minimum of 5 GCSE’s at grades 3-9 or grades A-D (including maths, English and science) or other equivalent vocational qualifications.

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Maintain golf greens, tees, fairways, surrounds, approaches and areas of rough and semi rough.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K9 K10 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K18 K19 K20 K21 K22 K24 K26 K27 K28 K29

S3 S4 S5 S7 S11 S13 S14 S15 S16 S19 S21 S23 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 2 Prepare the golf course for play, in line with the Rules of Golf and employer’s requirements.

K1 K3 K5 K6 K7 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K18 K24 K26 K27 K30

S3 S4 S5 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S15 S19 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 3 Prepare and setup golf course equipment to achieve required outcomes (e.g. hole changing equipment, bunker rakes, Stimpmeters).

K1 K3 K5 K6 K7 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K18

S4 S5 S7 S8 S9 S10 S15 S19

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 4 Prepare the ground and establish turf and plants around the golf course and clubhouse.

K1 K2 K3 K5 K6 K10 K24 K29

S3 S4 S5 S7 S14 S15 S21 S24 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 5 Identify and control weeds, pests, diseases and turf disorders on the golf course playing surfaces.

K3 K5 K6 K20 K21 K30

S4 S5 S7 S16

B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 6 Renovate and repair turf surfaces such as golf greens, tees, fairways and areas of rough.

K1 K3 K5 K6 K10 K11 K19 K20 K24 K27

S3 S4 S5 S7 S14 S15 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 7 Maintain and renovate bunkers.

K1 K3 K5 K6 K17 K24

S3 S4 S5 S11 S12 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 8 Maintain and renovate non turf areas such as pathways, penalty areas (e.g. water hazards, ditches).

K1 K3 K5 K6 K7 K11 K24 K26 K27

S3 S4 S5 S7 S8 S11 S19 S21 S22

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 9 Apply materials such as fertilisers, top dressing and seed across areas of the golf course.

K1 K2 K3 K5 K6 K19 K22 K23 K24 K26

S3 S4 S5 S7 S14 S15 S17 S18 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 10 Support the operation and maintenance of golf course drainage and irrigation systems.

K1 K3 K4 K6

S2 S4 S5 S7

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 11 Maintain wildlife habitats and environmentally sensitive areas within the golf course.

K1 K2 K3 K5 K6 K24 K26 K27 K30

S1 S3 S4

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 12 Collect information on golf course conditions and playability. Report information to team members and supervisors.

K1 K3 K6 K7 K9 K10 K15 K16 K19 K20 K28

S4 S5 S7 S9 S14 S19 S23 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 13 Prepare, setup and use golf course machinery to achieve required outcomes.

K1 K6 K14 K15 K16 K19 K24 K26

S4 S7 S14 S19 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 14 Carry out routine maintenance of golf equipment and machinery in line with organisational requirements and manufacturers' instructions. Report any faults to relevant team member.

K1 K6 K14 K24 K25

S3 S4 S19 S20

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 15 Keep up to date with advances in golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies and maintain continuous professional development (CPD).

K1 K3 K8

S6

B5

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: The environmental risks golf greenkeeping working practices present to people, animals, insects, plants, waterways and how these can be minimised. Back to Duty

K2: How golf course maintenance can interact with the natural environment to enhance biodiversity and conserve natural habitats. Back to Duty

K3: The impact of climate change on golf course sustainability (including course condition and playability, materials, coastal change). Back to Duty

K4: Typical components of golf course drainage and irrigation systems. Back to Duty

K5: Methods of sustainable waste management on and around the golf course and facilities (including, storage, disposal and consideration of water course). Back to Duty

K6: Health and safety legislation, regulations and polices relevant to golf greenkeeping, the golf course and surrounding facilities (including the Health and Safety at Work Act, Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurances Regulations, Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations, Control of Noise at Work Regulations, Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health, Food and Environmental Protection Act, plant protection products, Control of Vibration at Work Regulations, Manual Handling Operations Regulations, lone working). Back to Duty

K7: Methods used to develop and maintain effective working relationships (including greenkeeper's Code of Practice and Code of Ethics). Back to Duty

K8: How to keep up to date with advances in golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies. Back to Duty

K9: The methods of verbal and written communication and how they can be adapted to suit the situation and audience. Back to Duty

K10: The importance of equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Back to Duty

K11: Markings for golf areas (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds, tee markers). Back to Duty

K12: Golf green playing requirements and standards and how to measure green speed in line with United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions. Back to Duty

K13: Principles, methods and equipment used to change holes (including Rules of Golf, choosing position and required finish). Back to Duty

K14: Rotary and cylinder mower types used on a golf course, their application and safe setup and operation. Back to Duty

K15: Principles of mowing golf greens, tees, fairways and rough (including mowing patterns, importance of changing direction of cut, frequency of mowing golf course areas, heights of cut). Back to Duty

K16: Ground conditions affecting mowing and typical mowing problems (including scalping, tearing, ribbing, wash boarding, nap to grain). Back to Duty

K17: The features of a sand bunker and how they should be maintained and presented. Back to Duty

K18: The methods used for switching and brushing turf. Back to Duty

K19: The benefits of aeration, scarification, grooming and verticutting and typical equipment and methods used. Back to Duty

K20: Typical turf defects and methods of golf course turf repair (including overseeding, pitch mark and divot repair). Back to Duty

K21: Identification and control of weeds, pests, diseases and turf disorders (weeds including: Daisy, Dandelion, Slender speedwell, Yarrow, White Clover, Buttercup, Procumbent pearlwort, Great plantain, Ribwort plantain, Common chickweed, Lesser trefoil, Moss, Knotgrass, Creeping cinquefoil. Pests including: Earthworms, Chafer grubs, Leatherjackets, Bibionid Flies, Frit Flies, Moles. Diseases and disorders including: Microdochium Patch, Snow Mould, Red Thread, Anthracnose, Fairy Rings, Take-all Patch, Red Leaf Spot, Rapid Blight, Pink Patch, Dollar Spot, Brown Patch, Leaf Spot/Melting Out, Rust, Powdery Mildew, Yellow Turf, Black Layer. Turfgrass disorders including: Dry patch, Black layer, Drought, Scorch, Nutrient Imbalance, Cold Stress, Heat Stress). Back to Duty

K22: Methods and materials used for top dressing and the effect that weather has on the frequency and timing of top dressing operations across the golf course. Back to Duty

K23: What fertilisers do, the types that can be used, common application rates and how they are applied. Back to Duty

K24: Safe setup and operation of powered equipment in accordance with manufacturer instructions. Back to Duty

K25: Maintenance requirements for golf course tools, equipment and machinery and the importance of carrying out routine maintenance in accordance with required procedures. Back to Duty

K26: The processes and safety checks appropriate for preparing and operating tractors with attachments for use on playing surfaces. Back to Duty

K27: Maintenance requirements for lakes, ponds, ditches, waterways, pathways and other golf course hazards. Back to Duty

K28: Soil structures and the methods used to obtain and record soil and plant health condition. Back to Duty

K29: Ground preparation requirements to establish turf and plants. Back to Duty

K30: Plant, tree and shrub identification and characteristics (Plants (herbaceous, bedding, wildflower and invasive) including: Himalayan Balsam, Marsh marigold, Fern, Yarrow, Purple loosestrife, Marigold, French marigold, Fuschia, Busy Lizzy, Petunia, Common poppy, Daisy, Ragwort, Bluebell, Harebell, Japanese knotweed, Giant hogweed. Trees including: Pine, Oak, Silver birch, Beech, Ash, Hawthorn. Shrubs including: Broom, Cotoneaster, Gorse, Laurel, Dogwood, Heather, Photinia). Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Identify and maintain natural habitats and areas of biodiversity. Back to Duty

S2: Apply irrigation to achieve appropriate soil conditions and golf course playability. Back to Duty

S3: Handle, store and dispose of golf course waste materials in accordance with environmental or waste management policies. Back to Duty

S4: Monitor and maintain standards of health, safety and security for oneself, colleagues, golfers and visitors on the golf course and surrounding areas, in line with legislation and company policy and procedures. Back to Duty

S5: Establish and maintain working relationships with greenkeeping staff, colleagues and others within the golf club environment. Back to Duty

S6: Keep up to date with advances in working practices and technologies to maintain and develop personal performance. Back to Duty

S7: Communicate golf course related information to stakeholders, including greenkeeping staff, colleagues and golfers. Back to Duty

S8: Mark and maintain golf areas in line with the Rules of Golf (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds and tee markers). Back to Duty

S9: Measure, record and communicate green speeds applying the United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions. Back to Duty

S10: Position and change golf holes to the required finish and in accordance with the Rules of Golf. Back to Duty

S11: Set up mowers and mow areas of the golf course in accordance with golf course standards. Back to Duty

S12: Maintain and present bunkers for play. Back to Duty

S13: Switch and brush golf course turf. Back to Duty

S14: Set up equipment and aerate and scarify areas of the golf course. Back to Duty

S15: Repair damaged golf turf in play (for example, by turfing, plugging or patching). Back to Duty

S16: Use a range of integrated methods to control weeds, moss, fungal diseases, pests and turf disorder Back to Duty

S17: Apply top dressing in accordance with golf course requirements. Back to Duty

S18: Apply fertiliser to playing surfaces. Back to Duty

S19: Prepare, set up, operate and store tools, equipment and machinery in line with manufacturers' instructions and to the required specifications, to ensure their safe and effective use on golf turf surfaces and surrounding areas. Back to Duty

S20: Carry out routine maintenance to tools, equipment and machinery used for greenkeeping practices, in line with manufacturers' instructions and company policies and procedures. Back to Duty

S21: Prepare and operate a tractor with attachments in line with manufacturers instructions, legislation and company policies and procedures (including risk assessment, hitching, and safe stop). Back to Duty

S22: Maintain and renovate non-turf areas such as pathways, penalty areas. Back to Duty

S23: Monitor and record soil and plant health data. Back to Duty

S24: Prepare ground for the establishment of turf and seed. Back to Duty

S25: Identification of grass type through seed inspection and physical inspection of the plant using either common or botanical names. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Puts health and safety first for themselves, colleagues, golfers and visitors. Back to Duty

B2: Has a flexible and positive attitude to work. Back to Duty

B3: Team-focussed and works effectively with colleagues, others and as a lone worker. Back to Duty

B4: Committed to keeping others informed and communicating accurately in a timely and positive manner. Back to Duty

B5: Takes ownership of their own continuing professional development. Back to Duty

B6: Has a strong work ethic, demonstrates integrity and is respectful of others. Back to Duty

B7: Acts using own initiative to solve problems and make effective decisions within levels of own authority. Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

English and maths qualifications form a mandatory part of all apprenticeships and must be completed before an apprentice can pass through gateway. The requirements are detailed in the current version of the apprenticeship funding rules.

Professional recognition

This standard aligns with the following professional recognition:

  • The British & International Golf Greenkeepers Association (BIGGA). Completion of the apprenticeship will enable qualified apprentices to apply for full membership
Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.1

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the golf greenkeeper apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Golf greenkeeper apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 24 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a golf greenkeeper. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 3 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - test:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - practical assessment and questions:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 3 - professional discussion:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 24 months

The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence.

End-point assessment gateway

The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the occupational standard as a golf greenkeeper
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

For the professional discussion the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 3 months

Grades available for each assessment method:

Test

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

Practical assessment and questions

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Professional discussion

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction
Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with The British & International Golf Greenkeepers Association (BIGGA). Completion of the apprenticeship will enable qualified apprentices to apply for full membership

The apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 3 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think their apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard. The apprentice will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.
  • for the professional discussion the apprentice must submit: portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 10 pieces of evidence in the form of evidence packs. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

workplace documentation and records, for example:

  • workplace policies and procedures
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the professional discussion and facility walk.

It is expected that each evidence pack will contain a number of the evidence sources. It is expected that the portfolio will contain one evidence pack for each of the following:

  • developing personal performance and maintaining working relationships
  • monitor and maintain health and safety
  • use and maintain equipment and machines
  • prepare and operate equipment and machines
  • prepare and operate a tractor with attachments
  • present and maintain turf playing surfaces
  • renovate and repair sports turf surfaces
  • establishing plants outdoors
  • prepare the golf course for play
  • methods of verbal and written communication and how they can be adapted to suit the situation and audience.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Test

Overview

In the test, the apprentice answers questions in a controlled and invigilated environment. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because the criteria may not naturally occur during everyday business activities and it is important to demonstrate knowledge recall and understanding. It will ensure consistency and enables direct comparisons between apprentices. The multiple choice test is reliable and affordable to deliver and mark.

In relation to K21 and K30 the paper must include the following number of questions The scope of the paper will cover common names only for:

2 questions focussed on trees: Scots Pine, English Oak, Silver birch, Beech, Common Ash, Hawthorn

3 questions focussd on shrubs: Cherry laurel, Siberian Dog Wood, Gorse, Broom, Heather, Cotoneaster, Photinia

5 questions focussed on Herbaceous/bedding/wildflowers/invasive plants: Field poppy, Bluebells, Himalayan Balsam, Japanese Knotweed, Giant Hogweed, Marsh marigold, Polypody fern, Yarrow, Purple loosestrife, Marigold, French marigold, Fuchsia, Busy lizzy, Petunia, Daisy, Ragwort, Harebell

2 questions focussed on pests: Earthworm, Chafers, Leatherjackets, Bibionid Flies, Frit Fly, Moles.

5 questions focussed on disease and disorders: Microdochium Patch, Grey Snow Mould, Red Thread, Pink Patch, Dollar Spot, Take-all Patch, Anthracnose, Brown Patch, Leaf Spot/ Melting Out, Rust, Powdery Mildew, Yellow Tuft, Fairy Rings, Red Leaf Spot, Rapid Blight, Black Layer.

2 questions focussed on turfgrass disorders: Dry patch, Drought, Scorch, Nutrient Imbalance, Black Layer, Cold Stress, Heat Stress.

3 questions focussed on weeds: Daisy, Dandelion ,Yarrow, Bryophyta (Mosses), Procumbent pearlwort, White Clover, Greater (Broad leaved) Plantain , Ribwort (Narrow leaved) Plantain ,Knotgrass, Creeping buttercup, Creeping cinquefoil, Slender speedwell.

The remaining questions should then be distributed across the remaining knowledge statements mapped to the test.

Delivery


The test must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The test can be computer or paper based.

The test will consist of 50 multiple-choice questions.

Multiple-choice questions must have four options, including one correct answer.

The apprentice must be given at least 14 days’ notice of the date and time of the test.

Test administration

The apprentice must have 75 minutes to complete the test.

The test is closed book which means that the apprentice cannot refer to reference books or materials whilst taking the test.

The test must be taken in the presence of an invigilator who is the responsibility of the EPAO. The EPAO must have an invigilation policy setting out how the test must be conducted. It must state the ratio of apprentices to invigilators for the setting and allow the test to take place in a secure way.

The EPAO must verify the apprentice’s identity and ensure invigilation of the apprentice for example, with 360-degree cameras and screen sharing facilities.

The EPAO is responsible for the security of the test including the arrangements for on-line testing. The EPAO must ensure that their security arrangements maintain the validity and reliability of the test.

Marking

The test must be marked by an independent assessor or marker employed by the EPAO. They must follow a marking scheme produced by the EPAO. Marking by computer is allowed where question types support this.

A correct answer gets 1 mark.

Any incorrect or missing answers get zero marks.

The EPAO is responsible for overseeing the marking of the test.

Assessment location

The apprentice must take the test in a suitably controlled and invigilated environment that is a quiet room, free from distractions and influence. The EPAO must check the venue is suitable.

The test can take place remotely if the appropriate technology and systems are in place to prevent malpractice.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.    

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.  

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the test:

  • assessment materials for independent assessors and markers which includes:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • test specification
    • sample test and mark schemes
    • live tests and mark schemes
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Practical assessment and questions

Overview

In a practical assessment with questions, an independent assessor observes the apprentice completing a task or series of tasks set by the EPAO. The EPAO decides where it takes place. The assessment environment must closely relate to the apprentice’s natural working environment. This allows the apprentice to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. 

Rationale

The method allows the practical testing of knowledge, skills and behaviours holistically. The independent assessor will observe the apprentice undertaking work under controlled conditions. The method enables pre determined independent assessor training and resources to be developed and guarantees the required demand and challenge appearing during assessment.

Delivery

The practical assessment and questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the practical assessment and questions.

The independent assessor must only observe one apprentice at a time to ensure quality and rigour. They must be as unobtrusive as possible.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days notice of the . practical assessment and questions

The practical assessment and questions must take 3.5 hours.

The independent assessor can increase the time of the practical assessment and questions by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete a task or respond to a question if necessary.

The practical assessment and questions cannot be split, other than for comfort breaks or to allow apprentices to move from one location to another. Where breaks occur, or movement between tasks is required, they will not count towards the total EPA time.

EPAOs must manage invigilation of the apprentice during the assessment, to maintain security of the EPA, in line with their malpractice policy. This includes breaks and moving between locations during the working day.

The independent assessor must explain to the apprentice the format and timescales of the practical assessment and questions before it starts. This does not count towards the assessment time.

The independent assessor must observe the following during the practical assessment.

Task 1 - Switch, brush and mow a golf green. The golf green should have a minimum surface area of 300 metres squared (50 minutes).

Task 2 - Change golf hole to a new position and determine the green speed (30 minutes).

Task 3 - Repair damaged golf turf and position tee markers (20 minutes).

Task 4 - Maintain a bunker and present it for play in accordance with the golf course requirements (45 minutes).

Task 5 - Carry out pre start checks on a tractor, attach a trailer and reverse into a loading bay. Demonstrate lifting and lowering (35 minutes).

Task 6 - Physically inspect grass plants on the golf course to correctly identify 4 grasses from the 5 listed below. Also carry out grass seed inspection to correctly identify 3 seeds from the 5 grasses listed below (30 minutes)*.

Grass types can include:

• Perennial Ryegrass

• Fescue

• Bentgrass

• Smooth Stalked Meadow Grass

• Annual Meadow Grass

*The independent assessor will ensure that seeds and sample grasses are available in pots to support assessment where necessary.

Each individual task must be completed in the commercially acceptable times stated above. The independent assessor can increase the time of each task combined with questions by up to 10%.

These activities provide the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The independent assessor must ask questions. The purpose of the questions is to assess and confirm knowledge and understanding of the apprentice and ensure full coverage of the KSBs. Questions can be asked during the practical assessments. The time for questioning is included in the overall assessment time. The independent assessor must ask at least 1 question for each task.

Questioning can occur during the practical assessment. The time for questions asked during the practical assessment is included in the overall assessment time.

Independent assessors must ask at least 6 questions during the practical assessment. To remain as unobtrusive as possible, the independent assessor should ask questions during natural breaks in work rather than disrupting the apprentice’s flow. The independent assessor must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor can ask follow-up questions to clarify answers given by the apprentice. These questions are in addition to the above set number of questions for the practical assessment and questions and should be kept to a minimum.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs observed
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The practical assessment and responses to questions must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade. 

Assessment location

The practical assessment and questions will take place in a simulated environment selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises). The simulated environment must relate to the apprentice’s natural work environment. Equipment and resources needed for the practical assessment and questions must be provided by the EPAO, who can liaise with the employer to provide these.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the practical assessment and questions:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Professional discussion

Overview

In the discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate their competency across the KSBs mapped to this EPA method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because it:

  • allows the holistic assessment of KSBs
  • enables the independent assessor to draw on examples of work carried out by the apprentice
  • allows the use of the portfolio followed by questioning during a facilities walk. This will assist the apprentice to amplify their examples and to demonstrate the work carried out
  • will enable the independent assessor to test underpinning knowledge and understanding
  • will enable the consistent assessment of activities that might be carried out in different seasons
  • enables criteria to be assessed that would not occur regularly or would take too long to observe

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the professional discussion.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to test knowledge and understanding of the themes mapped to this method.

The professional discussion supported with a portfolio and the supplementary questions then carried out during a facility walk will last 90 minutes in total and consist of 2 parts.

The first part will take place in a room free from distractions and the second part (supplementary questions and answers) will take place alongside a facility walk. Travel time between locations will not count towards the total duration; the clock will be stopped. This length of time should allow for all relevant parts of the facility to be visited.

The independent assessor will specify what they wish to discuss during the facility walk and agree with the apprentice the areas they need to visit following part 1.

Part 1

In the first 30 minutes of the assessment, the independent assessor will conduct the discussion in a room free from distractions and allow the apprentice to refer to their portfolio. They will also agree on a route through the facility in the preparation for the supplementary questions carried out during a facility walk.

Part 2

The independent assessor will ask supplementary questions whilst walking around the pre-selected areas of the facility on a one-to-one basis with the apprentice (it is not necessary to visit the whole facility). Part 2 will last 60 minutes.

Part 1 and part 2 will be combined in order to cover the following distinct areas of work.

a.) continuing professional development

b.) communication and working relationships

c.) irrigation systems

d.) marking out and maintenance

e.) ground preparations, integrated pest management and application of fertilizers

f.) mowing and monitoring soil/ plant condition

g.) maintenance of tools, equipment and machinery

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 2 week(s) to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 90 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 10 questions and there should be at least one question per theme listed above. Follow-up questions are allowed where required. The independent assessor must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

Part 1 of the professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence. Part 2 should take place during a facility walk.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Grading

Practical assessment and questions

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Task 1: Mowing a green
K14 K18 K24 S3 S11 S13 S19

Performs switching and brushing of a golf course turf and describes the chosen method(s) used (K18, S13)

Demonstrates the preparation, setup, operation and storage of equipment, tools and machinery in line with manufacturers' instructions and to required specifications, to ensure their safe and effective use on golf turf surfaces  (K24, S19)

Demonstrates they can setup a mower and mow a golf green in accordance with golf standards. Describes how mower types (including rotary and cylinder types) are setup and used safely, supported by relevant examples of where they would be applied (K14, S11)

Demonstrates correct handling, storage and disposal of golf course waste materials in accordance with relevant policies (S3)

 

 

Explains the rationale for switching and brushing golf course turf (K18, S13)

 

Task 2: Green speed and hole position
K12 K13 S9 S10 B4

Applies principles, methods and equipment to position and change golf holes (including the Rules of Golf, choosing pin position and the required finish) (K13, S10)

Demonstrates they can accurately measure, record and communicate green speeds requirements and standards by applying the United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions (K12, S9)

 

Justifies the principles, methods and equipment used to position and change golf holes (including the Rules of Golf, choosing pin position and the required finish) (K13, S10)

Task 3: Repair damaged golf turf and position tee markers
S15 B1

Demonstrates they can effectively repair damaged golf turf in play whilst putting health and safety first for themselves, colleagues, golfers and visitors (S15, B1)

 

N/A

Task 4: Maintain and present a bunker for play
K17 S12

Effectively maintains and presents sand bunkers for play (K17, S12)

 

N/A

Task 5: Hitch a trailer and reverse a tractor
K26 S21

Effectively prepares and operates a tractor with attachments for use on sports turf surfaces, applying appropriate safety checks (including pre-start checks) and processes (including complete risk assessments, correct hitching, and safe stop procedures). Accurately describes appropriate processes in set up and operation (including lifting and lowering), confirming that they comply with manufacturer’s instructions, legislation/regulations, and company policies and procedures (K26, S21)

N/A

Task 6: Grass identification
S25

Demonstrates the identification of grass types on the golf course through physical inspection of plants and seeds to identify grass types, using common or botanical names (S25)

 

Uses common and botanical names when identifying grass and seed types and explains how the grass types are identified (S25)

Professional discussion

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Continuing professional development
K8 S6 B5

Describes how they take ownership of their own continuing professional development and how they keep up to date with advances in working practices and technologies to maintain and develop personal performance (K8, S6, B5)

Explains the importance of keeping up to date with advances in golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies and how this impacts their own development and personal performance (K8, S6, B5)

Communication and working relations
K9 S5 S7 B3 B6

Describes how they communicate golf course related information to stakeholders (including greenkeeping staff, colleagues and golfers) and how they adapt their communication method(s) to suit the situation and audience and how they demonstrate integrity, respect of others and a strong work ethic (K9, S7, B6)

Explains how they are team focused and establish, maintain and work effectively with greenkeeping staff, colleagues and others within the golf club environment, while also working effectively as a lone worker, supported by relevant examples (S5, B3)

Explains why their selected communication method was appropriate for the situation and audience, supported by detailed examples of communication with stakeholders (K9, S7)

Irrigation systems
K4 S2

Describes typical components of a golf course irrigation system and explains how they apply irrigation to achieve appropriate soil conditions and playability of the golf course (K4, S2)

N/A

Marking out and maintenance
K11 K27 S1 S8 S22

Describes how they mark and maintain golf areas in line with the Rules of Golf (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds and tee markers). Describes the maintenance requirements for lakes, ponds, ditches, waterways, pathways and other golf hazards, and explain how they maintain and renovate non-turf areas, supported by detailed examples (K11, K27, S8, S22)

Explains how they identify and maintain natural habitats, areas of biodiversity (S1)

N/A

Ground preparations, integrated pest management and application of fertilisers
S14 S16 S17 S18 S24 B2 B7

Describes how they use a range of integrated methods to control weeds, moss, fungal diseases, pests and turf disorders and use their own initiative to solve problems and make effective decisions with a flexible and positive attitude to work (S16, B2, B7)

Explains how they prepare the ground for turf and seed establishment, set up equipment, aerate and scarify areas of the golf course, apply fertiliser to playing surfaces and top dressing in accordance with golf course requirements (S14, S17, S18, S24)

Justifies the methods and materials used when applying fertilizers and controlling weeds, moss, fungal diseases, pests and turf disorders (S16, S18)

Mowing and monitoring soil/ plant condition
K15 K28 S4 S23

Explains how they safely and effectively mow and maintain different golf course environments (including greens, tees, fairways and rough), demonstrating knowledge and understanding of relevant principles and practices (including mowing patterns, changing the direction of cuts, heights of cuts, and frequencies). Describes soil structures and how they monitor and record soil and plant health data, explaining methods used to obtain and record soil and plant health conditions. Describes how they monitor and maintain necessary standards of health, safety, and security for all users on the golf course and surrounding areas, in line with company policies and procedures, and associated regulations and legislation (K15, K28, S4, S23)

N/A

Maintenance of tools, equipment and machinery
K25 S20

Explains the importance of, and how they carry out routine maintenance of tools, equipment and machinery used for greenkeeping practices in line with manufacturers' instructions and company policies and procedures (K25, S20)

N/A

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the apprenticeship grade of:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the: practical assessment and questions and professional discussion in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they will be awarded an overall fail. 

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall EPA merit the apprentice can achieve a merit in the test and a distinction in the remaining two methods or the apprentice can achieve distinction in two assessment methods and a pass in either the professional discussion or the practical. Alternatively, the apprentice can achieve a merit in the test and one distinction and one pass in either the professional discussion or the practical. To achieve an overall EPA distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in three assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Test Practical assessment and questions Professional discussion Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass Pass
Pass Pass Distinction Pass
Distinction Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Distinction Pass
Merit Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Pass Distinction Merit
Merit Distinction Distinction Merit
Merit Pass Distinction Merit
Merit Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 2 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements
  • undertake the EPA

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must:

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must: 

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO)
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship
  • understand the occupational standard
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used)
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually)
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy
  • verify the identity of the apprentice
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must:

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest
  • attend induction training
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship 
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan
  • assess the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan
  • make the grading decisions
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must:

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA

Marker

As a minimum, the marker must:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances
  • mark test answers in line with the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures

Invigilator

As a minimum, the invigilator must:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances
  • invigilate and supervise apprentices during tests and in breaks during assessment methods to prevent malpractice in accordance with the EPAO’s invigilation procedures

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to how the EPAO ensures valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. The EPAO must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section:

The EPAO must also:

  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 3 gained in the last 3 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
    • meet the following minimum requirements:
      • it is preferred that the independent assessors:
        • hold or be working towards a relevant assessment qualification
        • have and undertaken relevant occupational continuing professional development within the last 12 months to keep up to date with golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies

  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider.

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • completing applicable assessment methods online (for example computer-based assessment)
  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with:

The British & International Golf Greenkeepers Association (BIGGA). Completion of the apprenticeship will enable qualified apprentices to apply for full membership

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

The environmental risks golf greenkeeping working practices present to people, animals, insects, plants, waterways and how these can be minimised.

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Test
K2

How golf course maintenance can interact with the natural environment to enhance biodiversity and conserve natural habitats.

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Test
K3

The impact of climate change on golf course sustainability (including course condition and playability, materials, coastal change).

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Test
K4

Typical components of golf course drainage and irrigation systems.

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Professional discussion
K5

Methods of sustainable waste management on and around the golf course and facilities (including, storage, disposal and consideration of water course).

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Test
K6

Health and safety legislation, regulations and polices relevant to golf greenkeeping, the golf course and surrounding facilities (including the Health and Safety at Work Act, Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurances Regulations, Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations, Control of Noise at Work Regulations, Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health, Food and Environmental Protection Act, plant protection products, Control of Vibration at Work Regulations, Manual Handling Operations Regulations, lone working).

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Test
K7

Methods used to develop and maintain effective working relationships (including greenkeeper's Code of Practice and Code of Ethics).

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Test
K8

How to keep up to date with advances in golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies.

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Professional discussion
K9

The methods of verbal and written communication and how they can be adapted to suit the situation and audience.

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Professional discussion
K10

The importance of equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

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Test
K11

Markings for golf areas (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds, tee markers).

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Professional discussion
K12

Golf green playing requirements and standards and how to measure green speed in line with United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions.

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Practical assessment and questions
K13

Principles, methods and equipment used to change holes (including Rules of Golf, choosing position and required finish).

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Practical assessment and questions
K14

Rotary and cylinder mower types used on a golf course, their application and safe setup and operation.

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Practical assessment and questions
K15

Principles of mowing golf greens, tees, fairways and rough (including mowing patterns, importance of changing direction of cut, frequency of mowing golf course areas, heights of cut).

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Professional discussion
K16

Ground conditions affecting mowing and typical mowing problems (including scalping, tearing, ribbing, wash boarding, nap to grain).

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Test
K17

The features of a sand bunker and how they should be maintained and presented.

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Practical assessment and questions
K18

The methods used for switching and brushing turf.

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Practical assessment and questions
K19

The benefits of aeration, scarification, grooming and verticutting and typical equipment and methods used.

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Test
K20

Typical turf defects and methods of golf course turf repair (including overseeding, pitch mark and divot repair).

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Test
K21

Identification and control of weeds, pests, diseases and turf disorders (weeds including: Daisy, Dandelion, Slender speedwell, Yarrow, White Clover, Buttercup, Procumbent pearlwort, Great plantain, Ribwort plantain, Common chickweed, Lesser trefoil, Moss, Knotgrass, Creeping cinquefoil. Pests including: Earthworms, Chafer grubs, Leatherjackets, Bibionid Flies, Frit Flies, Moles. Diseases and disorders including: Microdochium Patch, Snow Mould, Red Thread, Anthracnose, Fairy Rings, Take-all Patch, Red Leaf Spot, Rapid Blight, Pink Patch, Dollar Spot, Brown Patch, Leaf Spot/Melting Out, Rust, Powdery Mildew, Yellow Turf, Black Layer. Turfgrass disorders including: Dry patch, Black layer, Drought, Scorch, Nutrient Imbalance, Cold Stress, Heat Stress).

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Test
K22

Methods and materials used for top dressing and the effect that weather has on the frequency and timing of top dressing operations across the golf course.

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Test
K23

What fertilisers do, the types that can be used, common application rates and how they are applied.

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Test
K24

Safe setup and operation of powered equipment in accordance with manufacturer instructions.

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Practical assessment and questions
K25

Maintenance requirements for golf course tools, equipment and machinery and the importance of carrying out routine maintenance in accordance with required procedures.

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Professional discussion
K26

The processes and safety checks appropriate for preparing and operating tractors with attachments for use on playing surfaces.

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Practical assessment and questions
K27

Maintenance requirements for lakes, ponds, ditches, waterways, pathways and other golf course hazards.

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Professional discussion
K28

Soil structures and the methods used to obtain and record soil and plant health condition.

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Professional discussion
K29

Ground preparation requirements to establish turf and plants.

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Test
K30

Plant, tree and shrub identification and characteristics (Plants (herbaceous, bedding, wildflower and invasive) including: Himalayan Balsam, Marsh marigold, Fern, Yarrow, Purple loosestrife, Marigold, French marigold, Fuschia, Busy Lizzy, Petunia, Common poppy, Daisy, Ragwort, Bluebell, Harebell, Japanese knotweed, Giant hogweed. Trees including: Pine, Oak, Silver birch, Beech, Ash, Hawthorn. Shrubs including: Broom, Cotoneaster, Gorse, Laurel, Dogwood, Heather, Photinia).

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Test
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Identify and maintain natural habitats and areas of biodiversity.

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Professional discussion
S2

Apply irrigation to achieve appropriate soil conditions and golf course playability.

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Professional discussion
S3

Handle, store and dispose of golf course waste materials in accordance with environmental or waste management policies.

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Practical assessment and questions
S4

Monitor and maintain standards of health, safety and security for oneself, colleagues, golfers and visitors on the golf course and surrounding areas, in line with legislation and company policy and procedures.

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Professional discussion
S5

Establish and maintain working relationships with greenkeeping staff, colleagues and others within the golf club environment.

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Professional discussion
S6

Keep up to date with advances in working practices and technologies to maintain and develop personal performance.

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Professional discussion
S7

Communicate golf course related information to stakeholders, including greenkeeping staff, colleagues and golfers.

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Professional discussion
S8

Mark and maintain golf areas in line with the Rules of Golf (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds and tee markers).

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Professional discussion
S9

Measure, record and communicate green speeds applying the United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions.

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Practical assessment and questions
S10

Position and change golf holes to the required finish and in accordance with the Rules of Golf.

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Practical assessment and questions
S11

Set up mowers and mow areas of the golf course in accordance with golf course standards.

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Practical assessment and questions
S12

Maintain and present bunkers for play.

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Practical assessment and questions
S13

Switch and brush golf course turf.

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Practical assessment and questions
S14

Set up equipment and aerate and scarify areas of the golf course.

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Professional discussion
S15

Repair damaged golf turf in play (for example, by turfing, plugging or patching).

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Practical assessment and questions
S16

Use a range of integrated methods to control weeds, moss, fungal diseases, pests and turf disorder

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Professional discussion
S17

Apply top dressing in accordance with golf course requirements.

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Professional discussion
S18

Apply fertiliser to playing surfaces.

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Professional discussion
S19

Prepare, set up, operate and store tools, equipment and machinery in line with manufacturers' instructions and to the required specifications, to ensure their safe and effective use on golf turf surfaces and surrounding areas.

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Practical assessment and questions
S20

Carry out routine maintenance to tools, equipment and machinery used for greenkeeping practices, in line with manufacturers' instructions and company policies and procedures.

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Professional discussion
S21

Prepare and operate a tractor with attachments in line with manufacturers instructions, legislation and company policies and procedures (including risk assessment, hitching, and safe stop).

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Practical assessment and questions
S22

Maintain and renovate non-turf areas such as pathways, penalty areas.

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Professional discussion
S23

Monitor and record soil and plant health data.

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Professional discussion
S24

Prepare ground for the establishment of turf and seed.

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Professional discussion
S25

Identification of grass type through seed inspection and physical inspection of the plant using either common or botanical names.

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Practical assessment and questions
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Puts health and safety first for themselves, colleagues, golfers and visitors.

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Practical assessment and questions
B2

Has a flexible and positive attitude to work.

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Professional discussion
B3

Team-focussed and works effectively with colleagues, others and as a lone worker.

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Professional discussion
B4

Committed to keeping others informed and communicating accurately in a timely and positive manner.

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Practical assessment and questions
B5

Takes ownership of their own continuing professional development.

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Professional discussion
B6

Has a strong work ethic, demonstrates integrity and is respectful of others.

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Professional discussion
B7

Acts using own initiative to solve problems and make effective decisions within levels of own authority.

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Professional discussion

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Test

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour

Practical assessment and questions

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Task 1: Mowing a green
K14 K18 K24
S3 S11 S13 S19

Rotary and cylinder mower types used on a golf course, their application and safe setup and operation. (K14)

The methods used for switching and brushing turf. (K18)

Safe setup and operation of powered equipment in accordance with manufacturer instructions. (K24)

Handle, store and dispose of golf course waste materials in accordance with environmental or waste management policies. (S3)

Set up mowers and mow areas of the golf course in accordance with golf course standards. (S11)

Switch and brush golf course turf. (S13)

Prepare, set up, operate and store tools, equipment and machinery in line with manufacturers' instructions and to the required specifications, to ensure their safe and effective use on golf turf surfaces and surrounding areas. (S19)

None

Task 2: Green speed and hole position
K12 K13
S9 S10
B4

Golf green playing requirements and standards and how to measure green speed in line with United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions. (K12)

Principles, methods and equipment used to change holes (including Rules of Golf, choosing position and required finish). (K13)

Measure, record and communicate green speeds applying the United States Golf Association (USGA) Stimpmeter instructions. (S9)

Position and change golf holes to the required finish and in accordance with the Rules of Golf. (S10)

Committed to keeping others informed and communicating accurately in a timely and positive manner. (B4)

Task 3: Repair damaged golf turf and position tee markers

S15
B1

None

Repair damaged golf turf in play (for example, by turfing, plugging or patching). (S15)

Puts health and safety first for themselves, colleagues, golfers and visitors. (B1)

Task 4: Maintain and present a bunker for play
K17
S12

The features of a sand bunker and how they should be maintained and presented. (K17)

Maintain and present bunkers for play. (S12)

None

Task 5: Hitch a trailer and reverse a tractor
K26
S21

The processes and safety checks appropriate for preparing and operating tractors with attachments for use on playing surfaces. (K26)

Prepare and operate a tractor with attachments in line with manufacturers instructions, legislation and company policies and procedures (including risk assessment, hitching, and safe stop). (S21)

None

Task 6: Grass identification

S25

None

Identification of grass type through seed inspection and physical inspection of the plant using either common or botanical names. (S25)

None

Professional discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Continuing professional development
K8
S6
B5

How to keep up to date with advances in golf greenkeeping working practices and technologies. (K8)

Keep up to date with advances in working practices and technologies to maintain and develop personal performance. (S6)

Takes ownership of their own continuing professional development. (B5)

Communication and working relations
K9
S5 S7
B3 B6

The methods of verbal and written communication and how they can be adapted to suit the situation and audience. (K9)

Establish and maintain working relationships with greenkeeping staff, colleagues and others within the golf club environment. (S5)

Communicate golf course related information to stakeholders, including greenkeeping staff, colleagues and golfers. (S7)

Team-focussed and works effectively with colleagues, others and as a lone worker. (B3)

Has a strong work ethic, demonstrates integrity and is respectful of others. (B6)

Irrigation systems
K4
S2

Typical components of golf course drainage and irrigation systems. (K4)

Apply irrigation to achieve appropriate soil conditions and golf course playability. (S2)

None

Marking out and maintenance
K11 K27
S1 S8 S22

Markings for golf areas (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds, tee markers). (K11)

Maintenance requirements for lakes, ponds, ditches, waterways, pathways and other golf course hazards. (K27)

Identify and maintain natural habitats and areas of biodiversity. (S1)

Mark and maintain golf areas in line with the Rules of Golf (including drop zones, hazard/ penalty areas, out of bounds and tee markers). (S8)

Maintain and renovate non-turf areas such as pathways, penalty areas. (S22)

None

Ground preparations, integrated pest management and application of fertilisers

S14 S16 S17 S18 S24
B2 B7

None

Set up equipment and aerate and scarify areas of the golf course. (S14)

Use a range of integrated methods to control weeds, moss, fungal diseases, pests and turf disorder (S16)

Apply top dressing in accordance with golf course requirements. (S17)

Apply fertiliser to playing surfaces. (S18)

Prepare ground for the establishment of turf and seed. (S24)

Has a flexible and positive attitude to work. (B2)

Acts using own initiative to solve problems and make effective decisions within levels of own authority. (B7)

Mowing and monitoring soil/ plant condition
K15 K28
S4 S23

Principles of mowing golf greens, tees, fairways and rough (including mowing patterns, importance of changing direction of cut, frequency of mowing golf course areas, heights of cut). (K15)

Soil structures and the methods used to obtain and record soil and plant health condition. (K28)

Monitor and maintain standards of health, safety and security for oneself, colleagues, golfers and visitors on the golf course and surrounding areas, in line with legislation and company policy and procedures. (S4)

Monitor and record soil and plant health data. (S23)

None

Maintenance of tools, equipment and machinery
K25
S20

Maintenance requirements for golf course tools, equipment and machinery and the importance of carrying out routine maintenance in accordance with required procedures. (K25)

Carry out routine maintenance to tools, equipment and machinery used for greenkeeping practices, in line with manufacturers' instructions and company policies and procedures. (S20)

None

Employers involved in creating the standard: British & International Golf Greenkeepers Association (BIGGA) , England Golf , Frilford Heath Golf Club, Gaudet Luce Golf Club, Greenkeepers Training Committee Ltd, Leyland Golf Club Ltd, Portmore Golf Club, Royal Birkdale, Sunningdale Golf Club, The London Club, The Richmond Golf Club, Trentham Golf Club, Woburn Golf Club

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 End-point assessment plan, standard and funding band revised 01/11/2023 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 26/03/2015 31/10/2023 Not set

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