Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0010
  3. Version: 1.1
  4. Level: 6
  5. Degree: integrated degree
  6. Typical duration to gateway: 48 months
  7. Typical EPA period: 9 months
  8. Maximum funding: £27000
  9. Route: Engineering and manufacturing
  10. Date updated: 09/11/2023
  11. Approved for delivery: 3 September 2015
  12. Lars code: 37
  13. EQA provider: Office for Students
  14. Example progression routes:
  15. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
Print apprenticeship summary

Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Creating aircraft components and equipment, specialising in a specific engineering discipline (for example - airframe, design and stress, systems integration, support engineering or manufacturing engineering).

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in the civil and military aerospace sector. The occupation can be found in large, medium and small employers across the world. Aerospace engineers may work on specific aerospace products and associated integrated aerospace environments and infrastructure. Examples include aerospace manufacturers, aerospace support services, airports, aircraft carriers and air traffic control.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to design and develop aircraft, aeronautical components and associated systems including operational support. They support customers by aiming to improve flight safety, aircraft efficiency and reduce costs. They review aerospace products and develop design and manufacturing processes or systems. They use project management and continuous improvement techniques. They also address the environmental impact of flight by adopting latest technologies. They are typically office-based. They may be required to work in production facilities and test facilities. They may also work in hangars or outdoors on the aircraft or ground equipment. They may be required to support customers in the UK and worldwide. Depending on the product, they may be required to work in confined spaces and at height. Depending on the nature of the work, they may be required to work shift patterns.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with colleagues across the organisation. For example manufacturing, project management, finance, human resources and procurement. They may also interact with customers, other specialist engineers, technicians, partners and suppliers. They will also work with different levels of engineers across multiple engineering disciplines. Depending on the organisation, they typically report to Senior Engineers, Senior Specialists or Chief Engineers. 

An employee in this occupation is responsible for working ethically and professionally. Aerospace engineers work to Civil and Military Aviation regulatory requirements. They must meet statutory and company regulations, taking responsibility for health and safety. They also take responsibility for environmental and sustainablity regulations, cost, quality, accuracy and efficiency. They must proactively find solutions to problems and identify areas for business improvement. Aerospace engineers work individually and as part of a team. Depending on the size and structure of the organisation they may manage technicians or teams of engineers.

Typical job titles include:

Aerodynamics engineer Aerospace design engineer Aerospace manufacturing engineer Aerospace materials engineer Aerospace research & development engineer Aerospace support engineer Aerospace test engineer Aircraft integration engineer Aircraft systems engineer Airframe structures engineer Airworthiness engineer

Duties

  • Duty 1 Plan, lead and support the delivery of aerospace projects ensuring integration with key stakeholders, company objectives and strategies.
  • Duty 2 Communicate key performance indicators, progress, risks and issues at all levels of the business, throughout the product lifecycle and through design reviews and technical reports.
  • Duty 3 Identify, evaluate, derive and maintain technical requirements for aerospace projects in line with regulatory and certification requirements.
  • Duty 4 Design or redesign aerospace products, systems and services to fulfil defined project requirements.
  • Duty 5 Generate, utilise, validate and verify technical analyses models and simulations to predict the performance of aerospace products and systems.
  • Duty 6 Oversee and project manage the production of prototype systems and components to validate and verify functionality and performance of aerospace products.
  • Duty 7 Develop, define, execute testing of aerospace products or systems for certification and stakeholder acceptance.
  • Duty 8 Analyse test and in-service data to review the suitability and performance of aerospace products and systems, utilising data analytics techniques.
  • Duty 9 Verify that aerospace processes, products and systems comply with local, national and international regulatory, legislative, customer and company standards throughout the life cycle. For example, quality, environmental, anti-bribery and corruption, Official Secrets Act, export control, health and safety standards.
  • Duty 10 Review performance of aerospace products, processes and systems, assess the cause of any faults or problems and propose modifications.
  • Duty 11 Implement and coordinate the continuous improvement of aerospace products, processes and systems.

Apprenticeship summary

ST0010, aerospace engineer level 6

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 48 months. The EPA period is typically 9 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the project: report and presentation with questions, the project's title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO and a project summary submitted

  • for the professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, you must submit a portfolio of evidence

  • passed any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard

For the aerospace engineer, the qualification required is:

BEng Aerospace engineering; BSc Aerospace engineering or other engineering degree that fully aligns to the KSBs on the apprenticeship

EAL Diploma in engineering and advanced manufacturing (development competence)

Assessment methods



Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.


Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

Please contact the professional body for more details.

This apprenticeship aligns with Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMECHE) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

Please contact the professional body for more details.

This apprenticeship aligns with Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

Please contact the professional body for more details.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in the civil and military aerospace sector. The occupation can be found in large, medium and small employers across the world. Aerospace engineers may work on specific aerospace products and associated integrated aerospace environments and infrastructure. Examples include aerospace manufacturers, aerospace support services, airports, aircraft carriers and air traffic control.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to design and develop aircraft, aeronautical components and associated systems including operational support. They support customers by aiming to improve flight safety, aircraft efficiency and reduce costs. They review aerospace products and develop design and manufacturing processes or systems. They use project management and continuous improvement techniques. They also address the environmental impact of flight by adopting latest technologies. They are typically office-based. They may be required to work in production facilities and test facilities. They may also work in hangars or outdoors on the aircraft or ground equipment. They may be required to support customers in the UK and worldwide. Depending on the product, they may be required to work in confined spaces and at height. Depending on the nature of the work, they may be required to work shift patterns.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with colleagues across the organisation. For example manufacturing, project management, finance, human resources and procurement. They may also interact with customers, other specialist engineers, technicians, partners and suppliers. They will also work with different levels of engineers across multiple engineering disciplines. Depending on the organisation, they typically report to Senior Engineers, Senior Specialists or Chief Engineers. 

An employee in this occupation is responsible for working ethically and professionally. Aerospace engineers work to Civil and Military Aviation regulatory requirements. They must meet statutory and company regulations, taking responsibility for health and safety. They also take responsibility for environmental and sustainablity regulations, cost, quality, accuracy and efficiency. They must proactively find solutions to problems and identify areas for business improvement. Aerospace engineers work individually and as part of a team. Depending on the size and structure of the organisation they may manage technicians or teams of engineers.

Typical job titles include:

Aerodynamics engineer Aerospace design engineer Aerospace manufacturing engineer Aerospace materials engineer Aerospace research & development engineer Aerospace support engineer Aerospace test engineer Aircraft integration engineer Aircraft systems engineer Airframe structures engineer Airworthiness engineer

Entry requirements

Whilst any entry requirements will be a matter for individual employers, typically an apprentice might be expected to have already achieved academic qualifications of 96* UCAS points or above at A-Level standard or equivalent, to include two STEM based subject such as Maths, Physics, ICT, Computing, Electronics. Plus Five GCSEs at Grade 4 and above** including Mathematics, English and Double Science or equivalent qualification.  (*Equal to 240 UCAS points. Prior to 2017,**equal to Grades C and above).

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Plan, lead and support the delivery of aerospace projects ensuring integration with key stakeholders, company objectives and strategies.

K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32

S1 S2 S3 S4 S7 S10 S14 S15 S16 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 2 Communicate key performance indicators, progress, risks and issues at all levels of the business, throughout the product lifecycle and through design reviews and technical reports.

K13 K16 K19 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31

S1 S2 S3 S4 S14 S16 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4

Duty 3 Identify, evaluate, derive and maintain technical requirements for aerospace projects in line with regulatory and certification requirements.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32

S10 S11 S15

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 4 Design or redesign aerospace products, systems and services to fulfil defined project requirements.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K19 K25 K26 K28 K29 K31 K32

S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S13 S15 S16 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 5 Generate, utilise, validate and verify technical analyses models and simulations to predict the performance of aerospace products and systems.

K3 K21 K22 K23 K25 K26 K28 K29 K31 K32

S5 S8 S9 S11 S13

B2 B3 B6

Duty 6 Oversee and project manage the production of prototype systems and components to validate and verify functionality and performance of aerospace products.

K7 K14 K16 K17 K18 K20 K21 K24 K25 K26 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32

S1 S2 S3 S4 S6 S7 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S16 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 7 Develop, define, execute testing of aerospace products or systems for certification and stakeholder acceptance.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K14 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K23 K24 K28 K29 K31 K32

S5 S12 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 8 Analyse test and in-service data to review the suitability and performance of aerospace products and systems, utilising data analytics techniques.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K29 K30

S5 S10 S12

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 9 Verify that aerospace processes, products and systems comply with local, national and international regulatory, legislative, customer and company standards throughout the life cycle. For example, quality, environmental, anti-bribery and corruption, Official Secrets Act, export control, health and safety standards.

K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K17 K20 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32

S10 S11 S15 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 10 Review performance of aerospace products, processes and systems, assess the cause of any faults or problems and propose modifications.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32

S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S13 S16 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 11 Implement and coordinate the continuous improvement of aerospace products, processes and systems.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S9 S10 S11 S13 S14 S16 S17

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Mathematics: the mathematical techniques and analytical methods required to model mechanical and electrical systems: algebra, calculus, geometry, trigonometry, statistics. Back to Duty

K2: Aeronautical engineering design: the creative design process including defining the problem, creating and evaluating ideas to select the design solution for a given aerospace engineering application and environment. Back to Duty

K3: Testing the engineering solution: the tools to support the process such as root cause analysis; requirements definition; simulation; production drawings; design for manufacture, cost and maintenance. Back to Duty

K4: Systems engineering: the system lifecycle from concept to disposal; requirements validation and verification; architecture definition, sub-system design and testing; integration; design for support and maintenance; functional safety, cyber vulnerability, data acquisition and secure data handling. Back to Duty

K5: Mechanical engineering: theory, design and application of mechanical equipment and systems, and the fundamental laws and theorems that govern them; including force and moment systems, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, beam theory, hydrostatics, kinematics, Work-Energy and Impulse-Momentum methods, vector algebra, scalar and graphical approaches. Back to Duty

K6: Aircraft structural engineering: analysis and modelling for the determination of the effects of loads on physical structures, mechanisms, and their associated components: static and fatigue stress, structural failure modes, safe-life and fail-safe design, Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Back to Duty

K7: Materials: the main classes of engineering materials and their associated mechanical, electrical and environmental properties. Techniques for selecting materials to achieve manufacturing and design requirements. Back to Duty

K8: Thermodynamics: core thermodynamic concepts, system types and the application to engineering systems: basic power cycles and their thermodynamic analysis. Back to Duty

K9: Electrical and electronic engineering: theory, design and application of equipment and systems which use electricity and electromagnetism, and the fundamental laws and theorems that govern electrical and electronic systems; alternating current and direct current (AC/DC), circuit design, transformers, motors, drives, analogue and digital. Back to Duty

K10: Aircraft stability and control: theoretical and practical aspects and principles of aircraft flight and performance. Back to Duty

K11: Aircraft systems: mechanical and electrical flight control systems, sensors, power generation and transmission, flying control surfaces, avionics, fuel, landing systems. Back to Duty

K12: Software engineering: principles of how to create and use computer programming applied to engineering systems, including real-time applications. Back to Duty

K13: Data analytics: data handling considerations (data protection and encryption), introduction to machine learning and Artificial Intelligence. Back to Duty

K14: Manufacturing: techniques for producing finished products efficiently and sustainably; common methods and models for the manufacturing process, Additive Manufacturing, composites and advanced metallic materials. Back to Duty

K15: Industry 4.0: impacts on organisations, integration of automation, digital systems and manufacturing engineering systems. Back to Duty

K16: Project management for aerospace activities: project planning, management of risks, commercial awareness, financial management and resourcing. Back to Duty

K17: Principles of quality control and quality assurance techniques in an aerospace environment. Back to Duty

K18: Continuous improvement methodologies. Back to Duty

K19: Problem solving tools and techniques. Back to Duty

K20: National and international safety requirements: statutory, regulatory, organisational and certification principles in an aerospace environment. Back to Duty

K21: Computer-aided design: 2D and 3D CAD using software packages. Back to Duty

K22: Aerodynamics: high and low speed aerodynamic techniques, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary conditions, drag and friction, compressible flow and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Back to Duty

K23: Fluid dynamics: different fluid flow types and the application to turbo machinery, hydraulics, pneumatics and liquid fuel: laminar and turbulent flow, boundary conditions, drag and friction, compressible flow and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Back to Duty

K24: Environment and sustainability: end to end value chain for sustainable products; Hydrogen, SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuels) and electrification. Avoidance, use and disposal of harmful materials according to appropriate environmental regulations. Back to Duty

K25: Teamwork and leadership: negotiation techniques, conflict management, people development techniques, performance management, diversity and inclusivity. Back to Duty

K26: Information technology: digital tools for engineering activities, configuration management, research and analysis. Back to Duty

K27: Information technology: digital tools for presentation of data, digital communication and collaboration packages. Back to Duty

K28: Communication techniques: verbal and written. Back to Duty

K29: Report writing techniques and methods. Back to Duty

K30: Presentation techniques. Back to Duty

K31: Time management techniques. Back to Duty

K32: International standards for engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Communicate with stakeholders: verbal and written. Back to Duty

S2: Write reports: data, technical information, drawings, outcomes and recommendations Back to Duty

S3: Present information. For example, presenting project progress and key performance information (KPI's) such as cost, quality, time, risk and opportunities. Presenting technical results or trade studies into design reviews. Back to Duty

S4: Use information technology: digital tools for presentation of data, digital communication and collaboration packages. Back to Duty

S5: Use information technology: digital tools for engineering activities, configuration management, research and analysis. For example, exploiting data analytics, artificial intelligence and machine learning. Back to Duty

S6: Use problem solving tools and techniques, for example: Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Process Failure Modes Effects Analysis (PFMEA), Fishbone and Practical Problem Solving (PPS). Back to Duty

S7: Use continuous improvement methodologies. For example, Kaizen, Lean manufacturing and Kanban. Back to Duty

S8: Produce and review design solutions, drawings, sketches using Computer Aided Design (CAD) and manual systems. Back to Duty

S9: Model real-world systems and products using, for example Computer Aided Modelling (CAM), Finite Element Modelling (FEM), Model Based System Engineering (MBSE). Back to Duty

S10: Assess different designs to identify solutions for a given aerospace engineering application and environment. Back to Duty

S11: Produce systems solutions considering integrated structural engineering designs. Back to Duty

S12: Develop and execute test plans to support aerospace product validation and approval. Back to Duty

S13: Design functional aerospace systems and assemblies from component level. For example, designing elements of a landing gear to produce a complete landing system. Back to Duty

S14: Apply project management techniques. For example, estimating, programming, risk, cost and budget control, time management and resource management. Back to Duty

S15: Identify and comply with legal and statutory requirements. For example, health and safety, environmental protection, sustainability, aerospace certification requirements and data protection. Back to Duty

S16: Plan and manage own time. Back to Duty

S17: Work with and lead others including, negotiation, conflict management and developing others. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Lead by example to promote health and safety. Back to Duty

B2: Lead by example and promote environment, ethical and sustainable practices. Back to Duty

B3: Adapt to challenging or changing situations and be resilient to the effects. Back to Duty

B4: Collaborate and promote teamwork across disciplines. Back to Duty

B5: Lead by example to promote accessibility, diversity and inclusion. Back to Duty

B6: Commits to their own and others' professional development. Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

BEng Aerospace engineering; BSc Aerospace engineering or other engineering degree that fully aligns to the KSBs on the apprenticeship

Level: 6 (integrated degree)

EAL Diploma in engineering and advanced manufacturing (development competence)

Level: 4

Ofqual regulated

Professional recognition

This standard partially aligns with the following professional recognition:

  • Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

    This apprenticeship standard aligns with the Engineering Council’s learning outcomes, indicated in ‘Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes’ (AHEP) and the competence framework detailed in UK-SPEC for Incorporated Engineer (IEng). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

  • Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMECHE) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

    This apprenticeship standard aligns with the Engineering Council’s learning outcomes, indicated in ‘Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes’ (AHEP) and the competence framework detailed in UK-SPEC for Incorporated Engineer (IEng). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

  • Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

    This apprenticeship standard aligns with the Engineering Council’s learning outcomes, indicated in ‘Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes’ (AHEP) and the competence framework detailed in UK-SPEC for Incorporated Engineer (IEng). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

Regulated standard

This is a regulated occupation.

Regulator body:

Civil Aviation Authority

Training Provider does not require approval by regulator body

EPAO does not require approval by regulator body

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.1

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the aerospace engineer degree-apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering their EPA.

Aerospace engineer apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

A degree-apprenticeship enables the awarding of a degree within the achievement of an apprenticeship. This means the degree learning outcomes must be aligned with the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) in the apprenticeship. Therefore, the apprenticeship and the degree must be completed, passed and awarded together to achieve the aerospace engineer degree-apprenticeship.

Apprentices must complete and pass all on and off-the-job training before completing an EPA to determine occupational competence.

A degree-apprenticeship must be delivered by a Higher Education Provider (HEP) that is on both the register of apprenticeship training providers (RoATP) and the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO). The apprentice's employer must select an HEP who is on both registers.

If the HEP is using a credit framework, the EPA must contribute to the total credit value, and must be delivered in accordance with this assessment plan. However, the number of credits devoted to EPA may vary across HEPs. The recommended EPA contribution is a 12th of the total credit value.

A full-time apprentice typically spends 48 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards occupational competence as an aerospace engineer. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA should then be completed within an EPA period lasting typically 9 months.

Occupational competence is outlined by the EPA grade descriptors and determined, when assessed in accordance with this EPA plan, by an independent assessor who is an occupational expert and confirms the overall EPA grade.

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each EPA method are:

EPA method 1 - project: report and presentation with questions:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

EPA method 2 - professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail
  • pass

The result from each EPA method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 48 months

The apprentice must:

  • complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) outlined in this apprenticeship’s occupational standard
  • complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications as specified by the apprenticeship funding rules
  • work towards all required elements of the BEng or BSc aerospace engineering or other engineering degree that fully aligns to the KSBs on the degree-apprenticeship, except those forming the EPA.
  • achieve EAL L4 diploma in engineering and advanced manufacturing (development competence)
  • compile a portfolio of evidence.
End-point assessment gateway

For the apprentice to pass gateway, the employer must confirm that the apprentice is working at or above the level of occupational competence.

The apprentice must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • achieved EAL L4 diploma in engineering and advanced manufacturing (development competence)
  • completed and passed all required elements of a BEng or BSc aerospace engineering or other engineering degree that fully aligns to the KSBs on the degree-apprenticeship, except those forming the EPA
  • completed and passed a summative assessment demonstrating the attainment of the following knowledge statements: K5, K7, K8, K9, K10, K11, K22 and K23 as part of their on-programme BEng aerospace engineering or BSc aerospace engineering or other engineering degree. Evidence of which must be submitted to the EPAO.
  • submit the project’s subject, title and scope with the EPAO (HEP) and employer having confirmed its suitability
  • submit a portfolio of evidence to support the professional discussion

Apprentices must submit all gateway evidence to their EPAO as required, including any relevant organisation specific policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 9 months

Grades available for each method:

Project: report and presentation with questions

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction
Professional recognition
This degree-apprenticeship standard aligns with the Engineering Council’s learning outcomes, indicated in ‘Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes’ (AHEP) and the competence framework detailed in UK-SPEC for Incorporated Engineer (IEng). The apprentice, on completion of this degree-apprenticeship will partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 9 months.

The expectation is that the EPAO will confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA starts as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice is working at or above the level of occupational competence as an aerospace engineer (degree). The apprentice will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet the following gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

They must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • achieved EAL L4 Diploma in engineering and advanced manufacturing (development competence)
  • completed and passed all required elements of a BEng or BSc aerospace engineering or other engineering degree that fully aligns to the KSBs on the apprenticeship standard, except those forming the EPA
  • completed and passed a summative assessment to evidence the attainment of knowledge statements K5, K7, K8, K9, K10, K11, K22 and K23 as part of their on-programme BEng aerospace engineering, BSc aerospace engineering or other engineering degree that fully aligns to the KSBs on the apprenticeship
  • submit the project’s subject, title and scope with the EPAO (HEP) and employer having confirmed its suitability
  • submit a portfolio of evidence for the professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

Apprentices must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. The portfolio of evidence will typically contain 8 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace policies and procedures, records
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the professional discussion. Assessors should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the professional discussion assessment method. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

Apprentices must submit all gateway evidence to their EPAO as required, including any relevant organisation specific policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Project: report and presentation with questions

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must start after the apprentice has gone through gateway.

The project: report and presentation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship. The EPAO must confirm that it provides the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • a project report

  • presentation with questions and answers

Grading decisions

The project and any components must be assessed holistically to decide the grade for this assessment method. The academic assessor assesses the project: report and presentation with questions against the EPA grading criteria. The occupational assessor must contribute to EPA grading decisions of the project: report and presentation with questions. In the case of differing EPA grading decisions between the two assessors, the occupational assessor’s decision is final.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because

• it is a holistic assessment method, allowing the apprentice to demonstrate KSBs in an integrated way

• it allows for a range of aerospace engineering activities to be demonstrated

• it provides a cost-effective assessment, as it minimises assessor time and makes use of the apprentice’s employer’s workplace, equipment and resources, and should contribute to workplace productivity

Delivery

The apprentice must complete a project based on any of the following:

  • a specific problem
  • a recurring issue
  • an idea or opportunity

The project must cover the following themes:

  • design assessment and problem solving: defining a problem, generating ideas, evaluating ideas, solving a problem and meeting the brief. Ethical and sustainable practices
  • engineering activities: engineering analysis, engineering and digital tools and techniques
  • project management: prioritisation of task, time management, risk management, resource management, contingency planning
  • continuous improvement: applying continuous improvement tools and techniques

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

The project output must be in the form of a report and presentation.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within the project period, to plan and complete their project.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project, which could include technical internal or external support. However, the project output must be the apprentice's own work and will be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm that the project output(s) is the apprentice's own work when it is submitted.

Component 1: Project report

The report must include at least:

  • a maximum of 200-words executive summary (or abstract)
  • an introduction
  • the scope of the project (including key performance indicators, aims and objectives)
  • a project plan that includes:
    • a Gantt chart
    • a brief commentary on how the research method will be implemented and the aims and objectives met
    • the required administrative forms, which can be stored within an appendix (for example: risk assessments, ethical reviews, budgetary requirements)
  • research outcomes
  • data analysis outcomes
  • background research or literature review findings
  • project methodology
  • project outcomes
  • discussion of findings
  • recommendations and conclusions
  • references
  • appendix containing mapping of KSBs to the report

The project report must have a word count of 10000 words. A tolerance of 10% above or below is allowed at the apprentice’s discretion. Appendices, references and diagrams are not included in this total. The project report must map, in an appendix, how it evidences the relevant KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice must complete and submit the report and any presentation materials to the EPAO by the end of week 32 of the EPA period.

Component 2: Presentation with questions

In the presentation with questions the apprentice delivers a presentation to the assessors on a set subject. The assessors must ask questions following the presentation. This gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The presentation will provide an overview of the apprentice's project and the project report. The assessors must ask questions after the presentation. All presentations must include at least:

  • an overview of the project
  • the project scope (including key performance indicators)
  • summary of actions undertaken by the apprentice
  • project outcomes and how these were achieved

The apprentice must deliver their presentation to both assessors at the same time.

The assessors must ask questions after the presentation.

The presentation with questions must last 60 minutes. This will typically include a presentation of 25 minutes and questioning lasting  35 minutes. The assessors can increase the total time of the presentation and questioning by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete their last point or respond to a question if necessary.

The assessors must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required. The assessors must use the full time available for questioning.

The purpose of the assessors questions will be to assess the following themes:

  • design assessment and problem solving
  • engineering activities
  • project management
  • continuous improvement
  • report writing
  • presentation skills

The purpose of the assessors questions will also be to:

  • to verify that the project is the apprentice's own work
  • seek clarification on the report or presentation
  • assess the depth and breadth of knowledge, skills and behaviour
  • allow the apprentice the opportunity to evidence occupational competence at the highest level available unless the apprentice has already achieved the highest grade available

The apprentice must prepare and submit their presentation to the EPAO at the same time as the report which is a maximum of 32 weeks after the gateway. The apprentice must notify the EPAO, at the submission of the presentation, of any technical requirements for the presentation.

For the presentation, the apprentice will have access to:

  • audio-visual presentation equipment
  • flip chart and writing and drawing materials
  • computer

The assessors must have at least 2 weeks to review the project report and presentation speaker notes and supporting materials, before the presentation is delivered by the apprentice, to allow them to prepare questions.

The EPAO must give the apprentice at least 2 weeks notice of the date and time of the presentation with questions.

Assessment location

The presentation with questions must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises. The presentation with questions should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The presentation with questions can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write an assessment specification and question bank. The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. EPAOs should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The assessment specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The EPAO must develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place, for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. EPAOs must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the project: report and presentation with questions:

  • assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the professional discussion, the assessors and the apprentice have a formal conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate their competency across the KSBs mapped to this EPA method.

Grading decisions

The occupational assessor assesses the professional discussion against the EPA grading criteria and makes the EPA grade decision.

The academic assessor must contribute to the EPA grading decisions of the professional discussion.

In the case of differing EPA grading decisions between the two assessors, the occupational assessor’s decision is final.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

  • the professional discussion is an accurate method to assess those KSBs that are not likely to occur in the post gateway project.

  • an aerospace engineer is expected to discuss their findings and results of work-based tasks or previous projects in a formal setting and explain in detail their results.

  • the professional discussion will be underpinned by a portfolio which may outline:


    • examples of work, work-based training, development activities and performance reviews that the apprentice has undertaken during the “on-programme” apprenticeship period

    • details of the work, tasks or projects undertaken including a high-level overview, key objectives, deliverables, time periods for the work and a detailed description of the activities and apprentice’s contributions

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The assessors conduct and assess the professional discussion.

The purpose of the assessors questions will be to assess the following themes:

  • design and modelling
  • develop test plans

  • engineering integration

  • leadership, teamwork and communication

  • continued professional development (CPD)
  • software engineering

  • manufacturing
  • concept of industry 4.0

The EPAO must give an apprentice 2 weeks notice of the professional discussion.

The assessors must have at least 2 week(s) to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence, however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 60 minutes. The assessors can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

For the professional discussion, the assessors must ask at least 8 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed. The assessors must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training. The professional discussion must allow the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method at the highest possible grade.

The assessors must keep accurate records of the assessment. The records must include the KSBs met, the grade achieved and answers to questions.

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write an assessment specification and question bank. The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs shown in the mapping. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers and Professional Engineering Institutions (PEI) of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers and Professional Engineering Institutions (PEI). The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The assessment specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The EPAO must develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place, for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Grading

Project: report and presentation with questions

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Design assessment and problem solving
K2 K17 K19 K20 K24 S6 S10 S15 B1 B2

Critically assesses aerospace engineering designs to identify potential solutions and inform their decision making. Identifies a solution to a defined aeronautical engineering problem that promotes the environment and sustainable practices in-line with the brief. (K2, K24, S10)

Uses problem-solving tools and techniques and evaluates how they make a difference to either the customer or the business. (K19, S6)

Evaluates the extent to which the project solution complies with national and international legal, statutory, organisational and certification requirements, and aligns with aerospace quality control and assurance processes. (K17, K20, S15)

Acts as a role model to promote ethical, environmental and sustainable practices and health and safety in line with organisational policies (B1, B2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Critically evaluates how they use problem solving tools or techniques to better support decision making and business objectives. (K19, S6)

Identifies solutions which exceed the requirements set out in the project brief regarding, for example, time, quality, cost, sustainability or environmental impact. (K24, S10)

Engineering activities
K1 K13 K26 S5

Uses digital tools, data analysis and mathematics to undertake aerospace engineering activities, including configuration management, research and analysis, to achieve the outcomes of the project brief. (K1, K13, K26, S5)

Critically evaluates the advantage to the business of using digital tools and data analysis within aerospace engineering activities. (K13, K26, S5) 

Project management
K16 K31 S14 S16

Applies project management techniques to ensure their project meets the brief within the timescale, cost and quality constraints. Identifies and manages risks to deliver aerospace activities in line with organisational policies and project objectives.

(K16, S14)

Manages their own time in line with agreed budgets and organisational policies.

(K31, S16)

Critically evaluates their own management of time, costs and risks, outlining how they supported business objectives and priorities, outlining what they would do differently to improve their management of future projects.

(K16, S14)

Applies contingency planning techniques to mitigate risks to time, cost and quality.

(K31, S16)

Continuous improvement
K18 S7

Uses continuous improvement methods towards the delivery of the project.

(K18, S7)

Critically evaluates the impact on project outcomes of applying continuous improvement methodologies.

(K18, S7) 

Report writing
K29 S2

Writes reports conveying technical information, including data and drawings, with outcomes and recommendations that meet the needs of the project brief and target audience.

(K29, S2) 

N/A

Presentation skills
K27 K30 S3 S4

Delivers the presentation and conveys the project’s process, outcomes and technical information using digital tools and presentation techniques that meet the needs of the audience.

(K27, K30, S3, S4)

N/A

Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Design and modelling
K6 K21 K32 S8 S9

Explains and evaluates how they review design solutions to aerospace engineering challenges and produce sketches and drawings using computer-aided design (CAD) and manual systems that meet the business need.

(K21, K32, S8)

Explains and evaluates how they model real-world aircraft engineering systems and products using a digital modelling system to meet a business need.

(K6, S9)

Develop test plans
K3 S12

Defines test criteria and evaluates how they implement test plans that provide quantitative data that underpins aerospace product validation and approval decisions.

(K3, S12)

Engineering integration
K4 S11 S13

Explains and evaluates how they design functional aerospace systems and assemblies from component level that incorporate integrated engineering designs and produces solutions that meet a business need.

(K4, S11, S13)

Leadership, teamwork and communication
K25 K28 S1 S17 B3 B4 B5

Justifies their use of verbal and written communication techniques when interacting with stakeholders to negotiate and manage conflicts.

(K28, S1)

Articulates how they maintain resilience and adapt to challenging or changing situations whist collaborating with, leading and developing others to achieve desired outcomes.

(K25, S17, B3, B4)

Evaluates how they lead by example to ensure diversity, equality, inclusivity and accessibility needs of others are met. (B5)

Continuous professional development
B6

Evaluates the impact of their own professional development on their technical and professional competence.

Explains how their investment in the professional development of others has impacted both the individual and the business. (B6)

Software engineering
K12

Outlines the principles of creating and applying computer programming in engineering systems, including real-time applications. (K12) 

Manufacturing
K14

Explains the techniques and common methods and models used in efficient and sustainable manufacturing of finished products, including the use of additives, composites and advanced metallic materials. (K14)

Concept of industry 4.0
K15

Articulates the impact industry 4.0 is having on the ways of working in organisations and the benefits digitisation brings. (K15)  

Overall EPA grading

The assessment methods contribute equally to the overall EPA pass grade.

Performance in the EPA determines the apprenticeship grade of:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction

The EPAO must combine the final grades for the individual assessment methods to determine the overall EPA grade as follows:

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they will be awarded an overall EPA fail. 

To achieve an overall EPA pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall EPA distinction, apprentices must achieve a distinction in the project and a pass in the professional discussion.

Project: report and presentation with questions Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Overall Grading
Any grade Fail Fail
Fail Any grade Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

An apprentice who fails one or more assessment method(s) can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

An apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 6 months of the EPA outcome notification.

If the apprentice fails the project assessment method, they will be required to amend the project output in line with the assessors’ feedback. The apprentice will be given 4 weeks to rework and submit the amended report.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

An apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • undertake the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • prepare for and undertake the EPA including meeting all gateway requirements
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO (and therefore training provider)
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the level required by the occupational competence and so is ready for EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan
  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows appropriate opportunity for the KSBs to be met
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used to fulfil their role and carry out the EPA
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO (HEP)

As a minimum, the EPAO (HEP) must:

  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO)
  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP)
  • understand the degree-apprenticeship, including the occupational standard, EPA plan and funding
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material)
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence which ensures, as a minimum, no personal benefit or detriment is received by those delivering the EPA or from the result of an assessment and covers:
    • apprentices
    • employers
    • assessors
    • the HEP's role as a training provider
    • any other roles involved in delivery or grading of the EPA
  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent assessment and maintain records of IQA activity for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • appoint independent, competent and suitably qualified assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan
  • where required to facilitate the EPA, appoint administrators, invigilators and any other roles specified within this EPA plan. This should include how to record the rationale and evidence for grading decisions where required
  • standardise all assessors, before allowing them to deliver EPAs and:
    • when the EPA is updated
    • at least once a year
    • moderate their decisions once EPAs have begun
  • monitor the performance of all assessors and provide re-training where necessary
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • arrange for the EPA to take place in a timely manner, in consultation with the employer
  • provide information, advice and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met
  • host and facilitate the EPA or make suitable alternative arrangements
  • maintain the security of the EPA including, but not limited to, verifying the identity of the apprentice, invigilation, security of materials
  • where the EPA plan permits assessment away from the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary
  • arrange the certification of the degree-apprenticeship
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure

Training provider (HEP)

As a minimum, the training provider (HEP) must:

  • conform to the requirements of the register of apprenticeship training providers (RoATP)
  • ensure procedures are in place to mitigate against any conflict of interest
  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours as outlined in the occupational standard
  • deliver training to apprentices as outlined in their learner agreement
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan

Occupational assessor

As a minimum, an occupational assessor must:

  • be independent, without conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider, specifically, assessors must not receive a personal benefit or detriment from the result of the assessment
  • are not employed by the same organisation as the apprentice or supporting external quality assurance through an organisation on IfATE’s directory of professional and employer-led bodies. EPAOs may contract independent assessors subject to them meeting the requirements for independence
  • be current and active in the occupation, for example be sourced from the industry or a professional body
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation
  • have authority to represent the professional body where the EPA is acting as the professional body’s assessment process (if necessary and permitted in the EPA plan)
  • have the competence to assess the EPA and meet the requirements of the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the apprenticeship (occupational standard and EPA plan)
  • attend induction and standardisation events before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually on this degree-apprenticeship
  • use language in the delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the degree-apprenticeship
  • assess the apprentice against the KSBs and in accordance with the EPA plan
  • make all final grading decisions on an apprentice’s occupational competence in accordance with grading descriptors in this EPA plan
  • if an assessor panel is used, the independent assessor must chair and make final grading decisions
  • record and report all assessment outcome decisions for each apprentice
  • confirms the overall EPA grade
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • comply with external quality assurance (EQA) requirements for the degree-apprenticeship
  • work with other personnel, including additional assessors where used, in the preparation and delivery of assessment methods

Academic assessor

As a minimum, an academic assessor must:

  • be independent, without any conflict of interest with the apprentice including with their training or employment, specifically assessors must not receive a personal benefit or detriment from the result of the assessment
  • if necessary and permitted in the EPA plan, have authority to represent the professional body where the EPA is acting as the professional body’s assessment process
  • understand the apprenticeship (occupational standard, and EPA plan)
  • have the competence to assess in accordance with the EPA plan
  • meet the requirements of the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • work with other personnel, including occupational assessors, in the preparation and delivery of assessment methods
  • attend induction and standardisation events before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually on this degree-apprenticeship
  • conducts the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan
  • use language in the delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the degree-apprenticeship
  • assess the apprentice against the KSBs and in accordance with the EPA plan
  • record and report all assessment evidence contributing to outcome decisions for each apprentice
  • undertake their assessor role in accordance with the EPA plan and do not make the overall EPA grade decision
  • comply with external quality assurance (EQA) requirements for the degree-apprenticeship

External examiner

As a minimum, the external examiner must:

  • confirm the EPA has been delivered in accordance with the EPA plan
  • accept, and therefore not change, the EPA grading decisions made by the independent assessor
  • comply with the requirements of the EPA plan and IfATE policies
  • comply with the requirements, policies, and procedures of the DQB
  • be independent of the apprentice, and the employing organisation who are involved in delivering the apprenticeship
  • be independent of the delivery and awarding of the EPA
  • not have been involved in the teaching or on-programme assessment of the apprentice

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to the strategies, policies and procedures that EPAOs must have in place to ensure valid, consistent and reliable end-point assessment decisions.

EPAOs for this EPA must adhere to all requirements within the roles and responsibilities table and:

  • appoint occupational assessors who also:
    • hold relevant engineering institution recognition (through a suitable professional engineering institution) or equivalent industry experience to at least occupational level 6 gained in the last 3 years. Apprentices seeking to achieve IEng recognition, following completion of the EPA, must be assessed by an occupational assessor who holds the relevant PEI qualification.
  • appoint academic assessors who also:
    • are competent to conduct academic reviews and assessments at level 6

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • assessing multiple apprentices simultaneously where the assessment method permits this
  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

This degree-apprenticeship standard aligns with the Engineering Council’s learning outcomes, indicated in ‘Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes’ (AHEP) and the competence framework detailed in UK-SPEC for Incorporated Engineer (IEng). The apprentice, on completion of this degree-apprenticeship will partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

This degree-apprenticeship aligns with:

Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMECHE) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for Incorporated Engineer (IEng)

Aggregation of the degree-apprenticeship

The outcome of the EPA must be aggregated with the degree to enable the degree-apprenticeship to be awarded. Once the overall EPA grade has been determined in accordance with this EPA plan, aggregation can be achieved in a variety of ways. This will be determined during the creation of the degree-apprenticeship. Examples of how this aggregation can work include:

  • each assessment method grade, and therefore the overall EPA grade, can be converted to marks or percentages however these must be an absolute figure and not a range
  • alternatively, the overall EPA grade can be used directly

HEPs can explore other ways of aggregating the EPA with the degree outcomes in-line with the latest IfATE degree-apprenticeship policy

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Mathematics: the mathematical techniques and analytical methods required to model mechanical and electrical systems: algebra, calculus, geometry, trigonometry, statistics.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K2

Aeronautical engineering design: the creative design process including defining the problem, creating and evaluating ideas to select the design solution for a given aerospace engineering application and environment.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K3

Testing the engineering solution: the tools to support the process such as root cause analysis; requirements definition; simulation; production drawings; design for manufacture, cost and maintenance.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K4

Systems engineering: the system lifecycle from concept to disposal; requirements validation and verification; architecture definition, sub-system design and testing; integration; design for support and maintenance; functional safety, cyber vulnerability, data acquisition and secure data handling.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K5

Mechanical engineering: theory, design and application of mechanical equipment and systems, and the fundamental laws and theorems that govern them; including force and moment systems, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, beam theory, hydrostatics, kinematics, Work-Energy and Impulse-Momentum methods, vector algebra, scalar and graphical approaches.

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K6

Aircraft structural engineering: analysis and modelling for the determination of the effects of loads on physical structures, mechanisms, and their associated components: static and fatigue stress, structural failure modes, safe-life and fail-safe design, Finite Element Analysis (FEA).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K7

Materials: the main classes of engineering materials and their associated mechanical, electrical and environmental properties. Techniques for selecting materials to achieve manufacturing and design requirements.

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K8

Thermodynamics: core thermodynamic concepts, system types and the application to engineering systems: basic power cycles and their thermodynamic analysis.

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K9

Electrical and electronic engineering: theory, design and application of equipment and systems which use electricity and electromagnetism, and the fundamental laws and theorems that govern electrical and electronic systems; alternating current and direct current (AC/DC), circuit design, transformers, motors, drives, analogue and digital.

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K10

Aircraft stability and control: theoretical and practical aspects and principles of aircraft flight and performance.

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K11

Aircraft systems: mechanical and electrical flight control systems, sensors, power generation and transmission, flying control surfaces, avionics, fuel, landing systems.

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K12

Software engineering: principles of how to create and use computer programming applied to engineering systems, including real-time applications.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K13

Data analytics: data handling considerations (data protection and encryption), introduction to machine learning and Artificial Intelligence.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K14

Manufacturing: techniques for producing finished products efficiently and sustainably; common methods and models for the manufacturing process, Additive Manufacturing, composites and advanced metallic materials.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K15

Industry 4.0: impacts on organisations, integration of automation, digital systems and manufacturing engineering systems.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K16

Project management for aerospace activities: project planning, management of risks, commercial awareness, financial management and resourcing.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K17

Principles of quality control and quality assurance techniques in an aerospace environment.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K18

Continuous improvement methodologies.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K19

Problem solving tools and techniques.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K20

National and international safety requirements: statutory, regulatory, organisational and certification principles in an aerospace environment.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K21

Computer-aided design: 2D and 3D CAD using software packages.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K22

Aerodynamics: high and low speed aerodynamic techniques, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary conditions, drag and friction, compressible flow and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K23

Fluid dynamics: different fluid flow types and the application to turbo machinery, hydraulics, pneumatics and liquid fuel: laminar and turbulent flow, boundary conditions, drag and friction, compressible flow and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

Back to Grading
No mapped assessment methods
K24

Environment and sustainability: end to end value chain for sustainable products; Hydrogen, SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuels) and electrification. Avoidance, use and disposal of harmful materials according to appropriate environmental regulations.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K25

Teamwork and leadership: negotiation techniques, conflict management, people development techniques, performance management, diversity and inclusivity.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K26

Information technology: digital tools for engineering activities, configuration management, research and analysis.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K27

Information technology: digital tools for presentation of data, digital communication and collaboration packages.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K28

Communication techniques: verbal and written.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K29

Report writing techniques and methods.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K30

Presentation techniques.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K31

Time management techniques.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
K32

International standards for engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Communicate with stakeholders: verbal and written.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S2

Write reports: data, technical information, drawings, outcomes and recommendations

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S3

Present information. For example, presenting project progress and key performance information (KPI's) such as cost, quality, time, risk and opportunities. Presenting technical results or trade studies into design reviews.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S4

Use information technology: digital tools for presentation of data, digital communication and collaboration packages.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S5

Use information technology: digital tools for engineering activities, configuration management, research and analysis. For example, exploiting data analytics, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S6

Use problem solving tools and techniques, for example: Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Process Failure Modes Effects Analysis (PFMEA), Fishbone and Practical Problem Solving (PPS).

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S7

Use continuous improvement methodologies. For example, Kaizen, Lean manufacturing and Kanban.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S8

Produce and review design solutions, drawings, sketches using Computer Aided Design (CAD) and manual systems.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S9

Model real-world systems and products using, for example Computer Aided Modelling (CAM), Finite Element Modelling (FEM), Model Based System Engineering (MBSE).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S10

Assess different designs to identify solutions for a given aerospace engineering application and environment.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S11

Produce systems solutions considering integrated structural engineering designs.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12

Develop and execute test plans to support aerospace product validation and approval.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S13

Design functional aerospace systems and assemblies from component level. For example, designing elements of a landing gear to produce a complete landing system.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S14

Apply project management techniques. For example, estimating, programming, risk, cost and budget control, time management and resource management.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S15

Identify and comply with legal and statutory requirements. For example, health and safety, environmental protection, sustainability, aerospace certification requirements and data protection.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S16

Plan and manage own time.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
S17

Work with and lead others including, negotiation, conflict management and developing others.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Lead by example to promote health and safety.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
B2

Lead by example and promote environment, ethical and sustainable practices.

Back to Grading
Project: report and presentation with questions
B3

Adapt to challenging or changing situations and be resilient to the effects.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B4

Collaborate and promote teamwork across disciplines.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B5

Lead by example to promote accessibility, diversity and inclusion.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B6

Commits to their own and others' professional development.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Project: report and presentation with questions

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Design assessment and problem solving
K2 K17 K19 K20 K24
S6 S10 S15
B1 B2

Aeronautical engineering design: the creative design process including defining the problem, creating and evaluating ideas to select the design solution for a given aerospace engineering application and environment. (K2)

Principles of quality control and quality assurance techniques in an aerospace environment. (K17)

Problem solving tools and techniques. (K19)

National and international safety requirements: statutory, regulatory, organisational and certification principles in an aerospace environment. (K20)

Environment and sustainability: end to end value chain for sustainable products; Hydrogen, SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuels) and electrification. Avoidance, use and disposal of harmful materials according to appropriate environmental regulations. (K24)

Use problem solving tools and techniques, for example: Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Process Failure Modes Effects Analysis (PFMEA), Fishbone and Practical Problem Solving (PPS). (S6)

Assess different designs to identify solutions for a given aerospace engineering application and environment. (S10)

Identify and comply with legal and statutory requirements. For example, health and safety, environmental protection, sustainability, aerospace certification requirements and data protection. (S15)

Lead by example to promote health and safety. (B1)

Lead by example and promote environment, ethical and sustainable practices. (B2)

Engineering activities
K1 K13 K26
S5

Mathematics: the mathematical techniques and analytical methods required to model mechanical and electrical systems: algebra, calculus, geometry, trigonometry, statistics. (K1)

Data analytics: data handling considerations (data protection and encryption), introduction to machine learning and Artificial Intelligence. (K13)

Information technology: digital tools for engineering activities, configuration management, research and analysis. (K26)

Use information technology: digital tools for engineering activities, configuration management, research and analysis. For example, exploiting data analytics, artificial intelligence and machine learning. (S5)

None

Project management
K16 K31
S14 S16

Project management for aerospace activities: project planning, management of risks, commercial awareness, financial management and resourcing. (K16)

Time management techniques. (K31)

Apply project management techniques. For example, estimating, programming, risk, cost and budget control, time management and resource management. (S14)

Plan and manage own time. (S16)

None

Continuous improvement
K18
S7

Continuous improvement methodologies. (K18)

Use continuous improvement methodologies. For example, Kaizen, Lean manufacturing and Kanban. (S7)

None

Report writing
K29
S2

Report writing techniques and methods. (K29)

Write reports: data, technical information, drawings, outcomes and recommendations (S2)

None

Presentation skills
K27 K30
S3 S4

Information technology: digital tools for presentation of data, digital communication and collaboration packages. (K27)

Presentation techniques. (K30)

Present information. For example, presenting project progress and key performance information (KPI's) such as cost, quality, time, risk and opportunities. Presenting technical results or trade studies into design reviews. (S3)

Use information technology: digital tools for presentation of data, digital communication and collaboration packages. (S4)

None

Professional discussion, underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Design and modelling
K6 K21 K32
S8 S9

Aircraft structural engineering: analysis and modelling for the determination of the effects of loads on physical structures, mechanisms, and their associated components: static and fatigue stress, structural failure modes, safe-life and fail-safe design, Finite Element Analysis (FEA). (K6)

Computer-aided design: 2D and 3D CAD using software packages. (K21)

International standards for engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. (K32)

Produce and review design solutions, drawings, sketches using Computer Aided Design (CAD) and manual systems. (S8)

Model real-world systems and products using, for example Computer Aided Modelling (CAM), Finite Element Modelling (FEM), Model Based System Engineering (MBSE). (S9)

None

Develop test plans
K3
S12

Testing the engineering solution: the tools to support the process such as root cause analysis; requirements definition; simulation; production drawings; design for manufacture, cost and maintenance. (K3)

Develop and execute test plans to support aerospace product validation and approval. (S12)

None

Engineering integration
K4
S11 S13

Systems engineering: the system lifecycle from concept to disposal; requirements validation and verification; architecture definition, sub-system design and testing; integration; design for support and maintenance; functional safety, cyber vulnerability, data acquisition and secure data handling. (K4)

Produce systems solutions considering integrated structural engineering designs. (S11)

Design functional aerospace systems and assemblies from component level. For example, designing elements of a landing gear to produce a complete landing system. (S13)

None

Leadership, teamwork and communication
K25 K28
S1 S17
B3 B4 B5

Teamwork and leadership: negotiation techniques, conflict management, people development techniques, performance management, diversity and inclusivity. (K25)

Communication techniques: verbal and written. (K28)

Communicate with stakeholders: verbal and written. (S1)

Work with and lead others including, negotiation, conflict management and developing others. (S17)

Adapt to challenging or changing situations and be resilient to the effects. (B3)

Collaborate and promote teamwork across disciplines. (B4)

Lead by example to promote accessibility, diversity and inclusion. (B5)

Continuous professional development


B6

None

None

Commits to their own and others' professional development. (B6)

Software engineering
K12

Software engineering: principles of how to create and use computer programming applied to engineering systems, including real-time applications. (K12)

None

None

Manufacturing
K14

Manufacturing: techniques for producing finished products efficiently and sustainably; common methods and models for the manufacturing process, Additive Manufacturing, composites and advanced metallic materials. (K14)

None

None

Concept of industry 4.0
K15

Industry 4.0: impacts on organisations, integration of automation, digital systems and manufacturing engineering systems. (K15)

None

None

Employers involved in creating the standard: BAE Systems, Airbus, Rolls Royce plc, GE Aviation Power & Systems, GKN Aerospace, Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group, AugustaWestland Ltd, Magellan Aerospace (UK) Ltd, GTA England

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 Standard, end-point assessment plan and funding band revised but funding remained the same. 08/11/2023 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 03/09/2015 07/11/2023 Not set

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