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Small vessel chief engineer

Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0875
  3. Version: 1.0
  4. Level: 4
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 48 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 6 months
  7. Maximum funding: £16000
  8. Route: Engineering and manufacturing
  9. Date updated: 22/08/2022
  10. Approved for delivery: 1 June 2022
  11. Lars code: 679
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual
  13. Review:

    This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

Print apprenticeship summary

Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Leading the engineering function for small vessels (less than 9000 Kilowatt and less than 3,000 Gross Tonnage) unlimited area.

Occupation summary

Small vessel chief engineers work in the maritime engineering sector.

Small vessel chief engineer (Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9000 Kilowatt, less than 3000 Gross Tonnage, unlimited area STCW Reg III/2) is a statutory regulated occupation. In the UK, it is regulated by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA). 

The occupation relates to eight categories of small vessel, as defined by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. These are:

  • fishing vessels
  • yachts
  • tugs
  • workboats
  • standby vessels
  • seismic survey vessels
  • oceanographic research vessels
  • Government patrol vessels

The small vessel chief engineer occupational standard incorporates the MCA’s regulatory requirements. It also has additional knowledge, skills and behaviours required for competency in the occupation, as defined by employers. In this document the inclusion of 'MCA' following a knowledge or skill statement means it is required by and assessed by the MCA.

Small vessel chief engineers ensure the day-to-day operation of the engineering aspects of a small vessel at sea and alongside (not at sea). This includes the vessel’s engine and other machinery and the technical side of ‘hotel services’ such as heating and ventilation. They prepare and check engineering systems, order engineering stock and supplies including bunkering (fuelling), and ready the vessel and systems for going to sea. Whilst at sea, they monitor engineering systems - adjusting parameters to maximise performance and minimise waste, diagnose faults and conduct basic repairs and replace parts. On return from sea, they shut down vessel running machinery and maintain operational availability. Liaising with repair contractors, keeping records, reporting, and preparing for statutory surveys and dry dock are all part of the role.

They typically work for several weeks at a time on board, sleeping on board, followed by a similar length of time on leave. Although some operate patterns to enable them to return home at the end of the day. The detail will vary between different types of vessels, and individual companies.

They are a first responder to safety related alarms and defects, both when on duty and on emergency alarm call out. Even when not on duty, a small vessel chief engineer needs to act during emergencies.

In their daily work, they interact with the vessel’s Master – who has overall responsibility for the vessel. Plus other officers and crew responsible for the navigation of the vessel. Depending on the size and nature of the vessel, they may work on their own or within a small team of engineers. They report directly to the vessel’s Master. They have contact with a shore-based Superintendent - who has responsibility for the engineering aspects of several vessels. Plus repair contractors and regulatory personnel, such as classification society surveyors and Port State inspectors.

They are responsible for conducting their duties in line with health, safety and environmental policy, and company procedures. They must work within the legal requirements set by international and national bodies. This includes SOLAS (International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea), MARPOL (International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships), local port requirements, and Port Marine Regulations. They can be personally prosecuted for failure to comply. They may have responsibility for the line management of more junior colleagues. They have budgetary responsibilities.

Typical job titles include:

Small vessel chief engineer Small vessel chief engineer officer

Duties

  • Duty 1 Prepare, maintain, and check vessel engineering systems whilst alongside.
  • Duty 2 Monitor engineering operational parameters whilst vessel is at sea for example, engine temperatures, and fuel, and oil and water consumption, adjusting engine and propulsion parameters to maximise fuel efficiency and minimise pollution.
  • Duty 3 Take overall responsibility for the monitoring of vessel equipment and its operational readiness.
  • Duty 4 Undertake planned maintenance of engineering components in accordance with the planned vessel maintenance system and manage others undertaking maintenance. Recommend improvements.
  • Duty 5 Maintain and test safety systems (for example, fire-fighting) and safety barriers, whilst at sea and alongside.
  • Duty 6 Undertake fault-finding and diagnosis of vessel engineering issues. Conduct basic repairs and replace parts.
  • Duty 7 Liaise with shore managers regarding vessel engineering repair contractor requirements. Control of engineering contractors undertaking vessel repairs.
  • Duty 8 Order stock and spares for the vessel operation including bunkering – storage and provision of fuel for vessel.
  • Duty 9 Operate vessel safety management systems, including conducting risk assessments in line with onboard procedures.
  • Duty 10 Carry out basic security checks for example, visual inspection of vessel, and checking identification for visitors on board the vessel.
  • Duty 11 Record and report on vessel engineering factors for example, planned and unplanned maintenance, fuel consumption, and waste.
  • Duty 12 Maintain vessel machinery spaces in a clean, tidy, and oil-free condition.
  • Duty 13 Take charge of the engineering response during an emergency. For example, vessel fire, flooding, collision, or hi-jacking.
  • Duty 14 Shut down vessel running machinery upon return from sea, whilst maintaining operational efficiency.
  • Duty 15 Prepare for statutory surveys and dry dock including preparation of the necessary paperwork and dry dock.
  • Duty 16 Commission and support sea trials.
  • Duty 17 Maintain equipment and tools for vessel maintenance.
  • Duty 18 Manage waste – storage and removal in line with environmental regulation, policy, and procedures.
  • Duty 19 Manage and lead the engineering team onboard including external contractors such as manufacturers’ representatives.

Apprenticeship summary

ST0875, small vessel chief engineer level 4


This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA. 

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 48 months. The EPA period is typically 6 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

When you pass the EPA, you will be awarded your apprenticeship certificate.

EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.



The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the project report and presentation with questions, the project's title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO and a project summary submitted

  • completed the Maritime and Coastguard Agency’s (MCA) mandatory qualifications, courses and other requirements to obtain a Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2, Certificate of Competency. These requirements are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.


Assessment methods








Project report and presentation with questions



You will complete a project and write a report. The title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO at the gateway. The report should be a maximum of 5000 words (with a 10% tolerance).

You will have 16 weeks to complete the project and submit the report to the EPAO.




You need to prepare and give a presentation to an independent assessor. Your presentation slides and any supporting materials should be submitted at the same time as the project output. The presentation with questions will last at least 30 minutes. The independent assessor will ask at least 5 questions about the project and presentation.

The EPAO will confirm where and when the assessment will take place.




MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2








Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.



You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.


Reasonable adjustments


If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.


Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) for Engineering Technician (EngTech)

Please contact the professional body for more details.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

Small vessel chief engineers work in the maritime engineering sector.

Small vessel chief engineer (Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9000 Kilowatt, less than 3000 Gross Tonnage, unlimited area STCW Reg III/2) is a statutory regulated occupation. In the UK, it is regulated by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA). 

The occupation relates to eight categories of small vessel, as defined by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. These are:

  • fishing vessels
  • yachts
  • tugs
  • workboats
  • standby vessels
  • seismic survey vessels
  • oceanographic research vessels
  • Government patrol vessels

The small vessel chief engineer occupational standard incorporates the MCA’s regulatory requirements. It also has additional knowledge, skills and behaviours required for competency in the occupation, as defined by employers. In this document the inclusion of 'MCA' following a knowledge or skill statement means it is required by and assessed by the MCA.

Small vessel chief engineers ensure the day-to-day operation of the engineering aspects of a small vessel at sea and alongside (not at sea). This includes the vessel’s engine and other machinery and the technical side of ‘hotel services’ such as heating and ventilation. They prepare and check engineering systems, order engineering stock and supplies including bunkering (fuelling), and ready the vessel and systems for going to sea. Whilst at sea, they monitor engineering systems - adjusting parameters to maximise performance and minimise waste, diagnose faults and conduct basic repairs and replace parts. On return from sea, they shut down vessel running machinery and maintain operational availability. Liaising with repair contractors, keeping records, reporting, and preparing for statutory surveys and dry dock are all part of the role.

They typically work for several weeks at a time on board, sleeping on board, followed by a similar length of time on leave. Although some operate patterns to enable them to return home at the end of the day. The detail will vary between different types of vessels, and individual companies.

They are a first responder to safety related alarms and defects, both when on duty and on emergency alarm call out. Even when not on duty, a small vessel chief engineer needs to act during emergencies.

In their daily work, they interact with the vessel’s Master – who has overall responsibility for the vessel. Plus other officers and crew responsible for the navigation of the vessel. Depending on the size and nature of the vessel, they may work on their own or within a small team of engineers. They report directly to the vessel’s Master. They have contact with a shore-based Superintendent - who has responsibility for the engineering aspects of several vessels. Plus repair contractors and regulatory personnel, such as classification society surveyors and Port State inspectors.

They are responsible for conducting their duties in line with health, safety and environmental policy, and company procedures. They must work within the legal requirements set by international and national bodies. This includes SOLAS (International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea), MARPOL (International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships), local port requirements, and Port Marine Regulations. They can be personally prosecuted for failure to comply. They may have responsibility for the line management of more junior colleagues. They have budgetary responsibilities.

Typical job titles include:

Small vessel chief engineer Small vessel chief engineer officer

Entry requirements

To meet the Merchant Shipping regulations individuals must meet medical standards (including eyesight). If you are considering a seagoing career, it is strongly advised that you have a medical and sight test, which includes testing of colour and visual acuity, before starting training. 

 

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Prepare, maintain, and check vessel engineering systems whilst alongside.

K1 K2 K6 K7 K10 K13 K15 K16 K17 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K33 K34 K36 K38 K43 K44

S5 S6 S7 S10 S11 S13 S15 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 2 Monitor engineering operational parameters whilst vessel is at sea for example, engine temperatures, and fuel, and oil and water consumption, adjusting engine and propulsion parameters to maximise fuel efficiency and minimise pollution.

K3 K11 K12 K13 K16 K17 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K32 K33 K38 K43 K44

S4 S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 3 Take overall responsibility for the monitoring of vessel equipment and its operational readiness.

K2 K3 K4 K6 K7 K8 K10 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K19 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K33 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 4 Undertake planned maintenance of engineering components in accordance with the planned vessel maintenance system and manage others undertaking maintenance. Recommend improvements.

K2 K6 K7 K8 K10 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K19 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K33 K43 K44

S8 S9 S10 S11 S13 S16 S17 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 5 Maintain and test safety systems (for example, fire-fighting) and safety barriers, whilst at sea and alongside.

K2 K5 K9 K10 K16 K21 K30 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18 S19

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 6 Undertake fault-finding and diagnosis of vessel engineering issues. Conduct basic repairs and replace parts.

K2 K3 K6 K7 K10 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K19 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K33 K34 K42 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 7 Liaise with shore managers regarding vessel engineering repair contractor requirements. Control of engineering contractors undertaking vessel repairs.

K3 K37 K41 K44 K48 K50

S10 S11 S12 S13 S16 S18 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 8 Order stock and spares for the vessel operation including bunkering – storage and provision of fuel for vessel.

K1 K2 K4 K40 K41 K43 K44 K46 K48 K49

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18 S19 S21

B1 B2 B3 B6

Duty 9 Operate vessel safety management systems, including conducting risk assessments in line with onboard procedures.

K10 K29 K30 K43 K44 K46

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B6

Duty 10 Carry out basic security checks for example, visual inspection of vessel, and checking identification for visitors on board the vessel.

K10 K20 K31 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B6

Duty 11 Record and report on vessel engineering factors for example, planned and unplanned maintenance, fuel consumption, and waste.

K2 K35 K43 K44 K45 K46 K47

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18 S19 S21

B1 B2 B3 B6

Duty 12 Maintain vessel machinery spaces in a clean, tidy, and oil-free condition.

K10 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 13 Take charge of the engineering response during an emergency. For example, vessel fire, flooding, collision, or hi-jacking.

K5 K9 K10 K20 K29 K30 K35 K43 K44 K50

S1 S2 S3 S10 S11 S12 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B5 B6

Duty 14 Shut down vessel running machinery upon return from sea, whilst maintaining operational efficiency.

K10 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S14 S15 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 15 Prepare for statutory surveys and dry dock including preparation of the necessary paperwork and dry dock.

K10 K35 K37 K39 K41 K43 K44 K45 K46 K47

S10 S11 S13 S14 S15 S16 S18 S19 S20 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 16 Commission and support sea trials.

K1 K10 K38 K39 K43 K44 K45 K46 K47

S10 S11 S13 S15 S16 S18 S20 S21

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 17 Maintain equipment and tools for vessel maintenance.

K10 K38 K43 K44

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 18 Manage waste – storage and removal in line with environmental regulation, policy, and procedures.

K10 K11 K18 K23 K43 K44 K48 K49

S10 S11 S13 S16 S18

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6

Duty 19 Manage and lead the engineering team onboard including external contractors such as manufacturers’ representatives.

K10 K35 K40 K41 K43 K44 K45 K48 K49 K50


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Understand the reason for determining voyage needs; fuel, lubricants, water, stores, expendables. [MCA] Back to Duty

K2: Understand the necessity for routine maintenance and the reasons for maintaining records of machinery and its performance. [MCA] Back to Duty

K3: Understand the consequences of sailing with certain items of machinery inoperative and the risks involved in doing so. [MCA] Back to Duty

K4: Understand the (Chief Engineer’s) responsibilities and duties concerning bunkering or refuelling operations. [MCA] Back to Duty

K5: The methods of dealing with fire on board ship. Prevention of the spread of fire. The organisation and direction of fire-fighting and lifesaving parties. [MCA] Back to Duty

K6: Care and management of steering systems and bow thrusters. [MCA] Back to Duty

K7: Care and management of pumping systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

K8: Care and management of oily water separator equipment. [MCA] Back to Duty

K9: (a) Construction, maintenance and operation of fire-fighting equipment, (b) Fire detection and prevention. [MCA] Back to Duty

K10: (a) Codes of safe working practices, risk assessment, permit to work (entry into enclosed space, hot work, electrical work), (b) The dangers of entering enclosed spaces. [MCA] Back to Duty

K11: Routine operational duties and the effect of legislation on engine room operations. [MCA] Back to Duty

K12: Working principles and constructional details of marine engines, gears, clutches and ancillary equipment. [MCA] Back to Duty

K13: Fuel oil, lubrication oil, and cooling systems of marine engines together with ancillary systems including filters, pumps, heat exchangers and controls. [MCA] Back to Duty

K14: (a) Methods of manoeuvring, including bridge control systems, variable pitch propellers and bow thrusters, (b) Emergency controls. [MCA] Back to Duty

K15: Working principles and constructional details of air compressors, air receivers and associated equipment. [MCA] Back to Duty

K16: Operational testing and fault rectification of basic control systems and alarm panels. [MCA] Back to Duty

K17: Safe and efficient operation and maintenance of marine engines and propulsion systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

K18: Knowledge of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annexes and implementations. [MCA] Back to Duty

K19: Principles of stability, water tight and watertight integrity, free surface effect and reserve buoyancy. [MCA] Back to Duty

K20: Basic understanding of International Safety Management (ISM). [MCA] Back to Duty

K21: Principles and constructional details of sensing, monitoring and measuring devices associated with marine equipment. [MCA] Back to Duty

K22: Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of propulsive transmission systems, including thrust and shaft bearings, stern tubes and propellers. [MCA] Back to Duty

K23: Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of bilge and ballast pumps, pumping and priming systems including pollution prevention equipment and systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

K24: Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of steering and stabilizing systems including bow thrusters. [MCA] Back to Duty

K25: Principles involved with operation, testing and maintenance of control and alarm systems associated with automatic operation of marine steam plant. [MCA] Back to Duty

K26: Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of: a. marine diesel engines (medium and high speed); gearing systems and clutches; b. starting and reversing systems; c. cooling and lubrication systems; d. fuel oil preparation systems; e. air compressors, receivers and associated equipment; f. auxiliary diesel engines and associated equipment; g. control and alarm systems associated with automatic operation of a diesel plant. [MCA] Back to Duty

K27: Methods of assessment of power output and diesel plant efficiency and action to be taken to maintain safe and efficient operation of plant. [MCA] Back to Duty

K28: Methods of testing fuel oil, lubrication oil and cooling water and action to be taken to maintain safe conditions. [MCA] Back to Duty

K29: Types of information issued by the MCA with respect to safety at sea. [MCA] Back to Duty

K30: Responsibilities of a chief engineer officer with regard to the control and prevention of fire: a. precautions against fire or explosions, explosive mixtures and sources of ignition; b. principles and methods of fire prevention, detection and extinction in all areas of a ship; c. principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of fire detection and extinguishing systems; d. principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of fire pumps and associated pumping systems; e. control and organization of fire and damage control parties. [MCA] Back to Duty

K31: Knowledge and understanding of applications and maintenance of ISM codes and system. [MCA] Back to Duty

K32: Organisation and control procedures necessary for the safe and efficient operation in the Unmanned Maritime Systems (UMS) mode. [MCA] Back to Duty

K33: Principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of: a. alternators, generators, motors, switch gear and batteries; b. ac and dc distribution systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

K34: Fault finding and rectification of faults in electrical systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

K35: Administration duties of a chief engineer associated with: a. organisation and training of staff for normal and emergency duties; b. organisation of temporary and permanent repairs and surveys – Company approval and Classification society. [MCA] Back to Duty

K36: Ensuring ship is in seaworthy condition prior to sailing taking into account nature of voyage. [MCA] Back to Duty

K37: Dry docking, hull surveys and repairs. [MCA] Back to Duty

K38: The introduction of increased automation, artificial intelligence, and emerging technologies in the maritime sector. Back to Duty

K39: Project management techniques: setting objectives, planning and monitoring. Back to Duty

K40: Commercial awareness; costing and budgeting principles. Back to Duty

K41: Resource management considerations: cost, quality, safety, security, and environmental impact. Back to Duty

K42: Problem solving tools and techniques: root cause analysis. Back to Duty

K43: Marine industry terminology. Back to Duty

K44: Communication techniques: verbal and written. Back to Duty

K45: Report writing techniques. Back to Duty

K46: Documentation requirements and importance. Back to Duty

K47: Information technology: word processing, spreadsheets, e-mail, and presentation. IT applications for technical reporting. Back to Duty

K48: Sustainability: current practices and developments in the sector. Back to Duty

K49: Ethical practices. Back to Duty

K50: Equality, diversity, and inclusion awareness. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Take personal emergency action onboard a vessel. [MCA] Back to Duty

S2: Respond to emergencies onboard a vessel. [MCA] Back to Duty

S3: Take control of survival craft and rescue boats. [MCA] Back to Duty

S4: Take charge of an engine room watch. [MCA] Back to Duty

S5: Prepare and operate vessel propulsion machinery and ancillary systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

S6: Operate vessel ancillaries and service machinery. [MCA] Back to Duty

S7: Operate and adjust vessel electrical systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

S8: Carry out maintenance to vessel electrical machinery and systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

S9: Carry out maintenance to vessel mechanical machinery and systems. [MCA] Back to Duty

S10: Maintain personal health, safety and environmental standards onboard a vessel. [MCA] Back to Duty

S11: Maintain safe, legal and effective working practices onboard a vessel. [MCA] Back to Duty

S12: Maintain and enhance productive working relationships onboard a vessel. [MCA] Back to Duty

S13: Identify costs and create a draft budget for sign-off. Back to Duty

S14: Apply project management techniques. Back to Duty

S15: Identify, organise, and use resources to complete tasks. Back to Duty

S16: Diagnose problems. Resolve or escalate problems in line with responsibilities. Back to Duty

S17: Review work to identify improvements. Back to Duty

S18: Communicate verbally and in writing with others for example, colleagues and contractors onboard or ashore. Back to Duty

S19: Complete documentation for example, machinery space logbook and oil record book. Back to Duty

S20: Write technical reports. Back to Duty

S21: Use information technology for example, word processing, spreadsheets, email, and presentation. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Promote and adopt a safety culture. Back to Duty

B2: Committed to protecting the marine environment from pollution. Back to Duty

B3: Take personal responsibility for their actions. Back to Duty

B4: Committed to quality and continuous improvement. Back to Duty

B5: Role-model equality and diversity expectations and requirements. Back to Duty

B6: Actively pursue professional development to maintain and enhance their competence. Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

An apprentice must complete the Maritime and Coastguard Agency’s (MCA) mandatory qualifications, courses and other requirements to obtain a Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2, Certificate of Competency . These requirements are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.

Level: 4

Professional recognition

This standard aligns with the following professional recognition:

  • Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) for Engineering Technician (EngTech)


Additional details


Regulated standard

This is a regulated occupation.

Regulator body:

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Training Provider must be approved by regulator body

EPAO does not require approval by regulator body

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.0

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the small vessel chief engineer apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering their EPA.

Small vessel chief engineer apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

The International Convention and Code on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch-keeping (STCW) set the global standards for maritime engineer officers. This includes the provisions prescribing the mandatory minimum requirements for engineers.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) is an executive agency of the Department for Transport UK. It implements the UK government’s maritime safety policy in the UK.

This apprenticeship leads to 'Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9000 Kilowatt (kW), less than 3000 Gross Tonnage (GT), unlimited area STCW Reg III/2’ Certificate of Competency (CoC).

The MCA's requirements for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2 are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.

This apprenticeship has a partially integrated EPA. The EPA uses an independent EPAO assessment alongside the MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2.

The integrated EPA is permitted because the following criteria are met:

  • Parliament has prescribed that the occupation (profession) must be regulated, and a statutory regulator has undisputed control of access to the occupation.
  • The partially integrated EPA meets the requirements of an apprenticeship.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 48 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a small vessel chief engineer. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - Project report and presentation with questions:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2:

  • fail
  • pass

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • Fail
  • Pass
  • Distinction







EPA summary table

On-programme (typically 48 months)
The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the small vessel chief engineer occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must complete training and work towards meeting the Maritime and Coastguard Agency's (MCA) mandatory qualifications, courses and other requirements leading to a notice of eligibility for the: MCA oral examination leading to Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2. These requirements are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.

End-point assessment gateway
The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the occupational standard as a small vessel chief engineer
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have completed the Maritime and Coastguard Agency's (MCA) mandatory qualifications, courses and other requirements leading to a notice of eligibility for the: MCA oral examination leading to Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2. These requirements are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.

The apprentice must have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

For the project report and presentation with questions, the apprentice must submit a project summary.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

The apprentice must submit all gateway evidence to the EPAO.











End-point assessment (typically 6 months)
Grades available for each assessment method:

Project report and presentation with questions

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2

  • fail
  • pass

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction
Professional recognition
This apprenticeship aligns with Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.
Re-sits and re-takes



  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: pass
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically, 2 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically, 6 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken within the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements are met and is typically 6 months.

The expectation is that the EPAO will confirm the gateway requirements are met and the EPA starts as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice is working at or above the small vessel chief engineer occupational standard. The apprentice then enters the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but they must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the project report and presentation with questions, the apprentice must submit a project summary


Project summary requirements

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. A brief project summary must be submitted to the EPAO. It should be no more than 500 words. This needs to show that the project will provide the opportunity for the apprentice to cover the KSBs mapped to this EPA method. It is not assessed.

  • completed the Maritime and Coastguard Agency’s (MCA) mandatory qualifications, courses and other requirements leading to a notice of eligibility for the: MCA oral examination leading to Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2. These requirements are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.

Example of the MCA's mandatory qualifications, courses, and other requirements

The apprenticeship has two stages which an apprentice must complete, each equating to an MCA issued Certificate of Competency (CoC):

1) Engineer Officer of the Watch, less than 9000 kW, less than 3000 GT, unlimited area (EOOW), STCW Convention Regulation III/2

Followed by:

2) Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9000 kW, less than 3000 GT unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2

Prior to joining first vessel for first sea voyage apprentices need to hold

  • a valid ENG1 (medical fitness certificate) or accepted equivalent
  • STCW Personal Survival Techniques
  • STCW Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting
  • STCW Elementary First Aid
  • STCW Personal Safety and Social Responsibilities
  • STCW Security Awareness

Stage one – new entrant to EOOW

There are three potential routes to EOOW, Convention regulation III/2:

1) Standard MCA approved programme - this route is outlined below

2) Experienced seafarer route

3) Alternative route: for graduate engineer, HND, HNC, or apprenticeship holder (3.5)

Standard MCA approved programme

To qualify for the issue of this CoC you must meet the following requirements:

(a) Hold an Approved Engine Course I and II (AEC I and II) – this is not required if you are completing your seagoing service as Assistant Engineer

(b) Have completed 12 months’ combined sea service and workshop training, which must include:

  • 6 months’ seagoing service engaged in watchkeeping or Unmanned Machinery Space (UMS) duties on vessels of at least 350 kW
  • 5 months’ seagoing service on vessels of at least 350 kW
  • 2 weeks MCA-approved Initial Workshop Skills Training
  • a further 2 weeks’ seagoing service on vessels of at least 350 kW or 2 weeks of MCA-approved additional Workshop Skills Training

(c) Complete the MNTB Small Vessel Training Record Book (TRB) during your seagoing service

(d) Complete the Diploma in Maritime Studies: Small Vessel Engineer

(e) Successfully pass the MCA-approved written examinations for:

  • Marine Diesel Engineering
  • Auxiliary Equipment Part – 1
  • Operational procedures, Basic Hotel Services and Ship Construction

(f) Hold the applicable ancillary and safety course certificates

  • STCW Personal Survival Techniques
  • STCW Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting
  • STCW Elementary First Aid
  • STCW Personal Safety and Social Responsibilities
  • STCW Proficiency in Survival Craft and Rescue
  • STCW Advanced Fire Fighting
  • STCW Medical First Aid
  • STCW HELM (Operational)

(g) Hold a valid ENG1 (medical fitness certificate) or accepted equivalent

With all the above obtained, the apprentice will be given a notice of eligibility for the: MCA oral examination for EOOW, STCW Convention Regulation III/2.

Upon passing the MCA oral examination, the apprentice is awarded their CoC and stage one is complete.

Stage two – EOOW to Chief Engineer Officer

Candidates need to meet the following requirements:

a) Have completed 24 months’ seagoing service which must include:

  • 12 months as a EOOW while holding the applicable STCW Convention regulation III/2 CoC
    • i. 6 months of this service must be complete on vessels of at least 750 kW
    • ii. 6 months of this service must be completed on vessels of at least 350 kW

Note: The 24 months’ seagoing service required for the Small Vessel Chief Engineer CoC does not include any workshop time. In effect this means that seagoing service accrued in stage one is only 11 months and therefore at least 13 months of seagoing service as an EOOW must be completed.

b) Successfully complete the MCA-approved modules and pass the corresponding written examinations for:

  • Auxiliary Equipment part 2
  • Chief Engineer Statutory and Operational Requirements
  • Applied Marine Engineering

c) Complete either:

  • MCA-approved modules and pass the corresponding written examinations for General Engineering Science I and II

OR

  • The Diploma in Maritime Studies: Small Vessel and the Diploma in Maritime Studies: Small Vessel Chief Engineer

d) Hold the applicable ancillary and safety course certificates (in addition to those held EOOW level):

  • STCW Human Element, Leadership and Management (Management)

With all the above obtained, the apprentice will be given a notice of eligibility for the: MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2. Upon passing the MCA oral examination, the apprentice is awarded their second CoC and stage two is complete. The MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2 forms part of the EPA for this apprenticeship.

Notes:

  • The MCA's requirements for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2 are detailed in MIN 524, or subsequent M-Notice.
  • The MNTB training record book is only used for reaching the EOOW CoC.
  • The above pathway only outlines the standard MCA approved programme when two others formally exist.
  • There are a range of caveats, exemptions and alternatives to specific requirements depending on circumstances which are detailed with the relevant MCA issued MIN.
  • Correct at time of publication. Please refer to the latest M-Notice.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

The apprentice must submit all gateway evidence to the EPAO.

The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms all gateway requirements have been met. The expectation is they will do this as quickly as possible.

Assessment methods

Assessment method 1: project report and presentation with questions must be completed before assessment method 2: MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2.

This order is to help ensure that apprentices complete the EPA.

An apprentice is lawfully permitted to work as a small vessel chief engineer once they have passed assessment method 2: MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2.

Successfully completing both assessment methods affirms full occupational competence for the purposes of this apprenticeship.

It is the responsibility of the EPAO to ensure that assessment method 2 is booked with the MCA, once the apprentice has achieved a minimum of a pass in assessment method 1.

Project report and presentation with questions



Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must meet the needs of the employer's business and be relevant to the apprentice's occupation and apprenticeship.



This project has 2 components:

  • a project report
  • a presentation with questions

Together, they give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate their competency across the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.



Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • it enables a holistic assessment of an activity which takes place over several weeks
  • it provides a cost-effective assessment as it minimises independent assessor time, makes use of the apprentice’s employer’s workplace, equipment, and resources, may contribute to workplace production, and can be administered remotely
  • the presentation provides an opportunity for the apprentice to directly demonstrate verbal communication and use of information technology

Delivery

The apprentice must complete a project based on any of the following:

  • a specific technical problem
  • a recurring operational issue
  • an idea or opportunity for example, to improve vessel efficiency or environmental impact
  • the introduction of new technology or regulations
  • a major machinery overhaul

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project summary at the gateway to confirm it is suitable.

The project output must be in the form of a report and presentation.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources within this period to plan and complete their project.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project, which could include internal colleagues or external support. The apprentice must however, complete their project report and presentation unaided and they must be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm this when they are submitted.

Component 1: Project report

The report must include at least:

  • a summary of the project
  • the scope of the project investigation
  • project delivery and outcomes, including project management
  • analysis of the information provided, and research undertaken
  • project conclusions stating how future outcomes may be achieved
  • an appendix including the project budget and documentation

The project report must have a word count of 5000 words. A tolerance of 10% above or below the word count is allowed at the apprentice’s discretion. Appendices, references and diagrams are not included in this total. The project report must map, in an appendix, how it evidences the relevant KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice must complete and submit the report to the EPAO by the end of week 16 of the EPA period.

Component 2: Presentation with questions

The presentation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to the assessment method to the highest available grade.

The apprentice must prepare, submit, and deliver a presentation on their project. The apprentice must deliver their presentation to the independent assessor. After the presentation, the independent assessor must ask questions.

The presentation and questioning must last 30 minutes. This will typically include a presentation of 10 minutes and questioning lasting 20 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the presentation and questioning by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The presentation should cover:

  • an overview of the project
  • the project scope (including key performance indicators)
  • summary of actions undertaken by the apprentice
  • project outcomes and how these were achieved

The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is:

  • to verify that the activity was completed by the apprentice
  • to seek clarification where required
  • to assess those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to demonstrate during the report, although these should be kept to a minimum
  • to assess the apprentice's level of competence against the grading descriptors

The apprentice must submit their presentation slides and any supporting materials for example, handouts to the EPAO at the same time as the report - by the end of week 16 of the EPA period.

The apprentice must notify the EPAO, at the submission of the presentation, of any technical requirements for the presentation. For the presentation, the apprentice should have access to:

  • audio-visual presentation equipment
  • flip chart, writing and drawing materials
  • computer

The independent assessor must have at least 2 weeks to review the project report and presentation before the presentation is delivered by the apprentice. This is to allow them to prepare appropriate questions.

The apprentice must be given at least 2 weeks notice of the date and time of the presentation with questions.

Assessment decisions

The independent assessor must make the grading decisions. The 2 components must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor against the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. The records must include the KSBs met, the grade achieved and answers to questions.



Assessment location



The presentation with questions must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises.
It should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The presentation with questioning can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write an assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with the employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers.

The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must develop a purpose-built question bank and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The assessment specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.



The EPAO must ensure that an apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following material to support this assessment method:



  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2

Overview

In the MCA oral examination, the apprentice is assessed verbally. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge and skills mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice must be 18 years of age to satisfy MCA requirements for certification. They may start the EPA process before they are 18 years of age, if they will be 18 or over at the point of certification.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because it is a regulatory requirement.

Delivery

The MCA oral examination is administered by the MCA in accordance with their own published guidance.

Assessment location

See the MCA's latest guidance.

Question and resource development

See the MCA's latest guidance.

Grading

Project report and presentation with questions

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Project management
K39 K40 K50 S13 S14 B1 B3 B5

Applies project management techniques, taking personal responsibility to complete the project and promoting and adopting a safety culture. (K39, S14, B1, B3)

Identifies the main costs of the project and creates a draft budget for sign-off taking account of commercial considerations. (K40, S13)

Acts as a role-model for equality and diversity expectations and requirements to support the project. (K50, B5)

Identifies potential issues that could impact on the project and their mitigations. (K39, S14)

Resource management
K41 K48 K49 S15 B2

Identifies, organises, and uses resources to complete the project with consideration given to cost, quality, safety, security, and environmental impact. (K41, S15)

Demonstrates a commitment to protecting the marine environment from pollution by following ethical and sustainable practices. (K48, K49, B2)

Justifies resource management priorities. (K41, S15)

Problem solving
K42 S16

Uses problem solving tools and techniques to diagnose problems. Resolves or escalates issues in line with responsibilities. (K42, S16)

Uses different tools and techniques to validate findings. (K42, S16)

Continuous improvement
K38 S17 B4

Reviews work to identify improvements to work practices or approach demonstrating a commitment to quality and continuous improvement. (S17, B4)

Explains the introduction of increased automation, artificial intelligence, and emerging technologies in the maritime sector and how they could potentially benefit the project. (K38)

Evaluates the actual or potential value of the improvement suggestion. (S17, B4)

Communication and information technology
K43 K44 K45 K47 S18 S20 S21

Uses verbal and written communication techniques suitable for the context, adapting style and terminology to suit the audience. Uses marine industry terminology correctly. (K43, K44, S18)

Writes technical reports suitable for the context using information technology including applications for technical writing. (K45, K47, S20, S21)

N/A

Documentation
K46 S19

Completes documentation required for the project, explaining their requirements and importance. (K46, S19) 

N/A

Continued professional development (CPD)
B6

Explains how the CPD they have undertaken and plan to undertake supports the maintenance and enhancement of their competence to complete projects in the role of a small vessel chief engineer. (B6)

N/A

MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
MCA
K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12

The MCA oral examination is administered by the MCA in accordance with their own published guidance. 

Overall EPA grading

The assessment methods contribute equally to the overall EPA pass grade.

Performance in the EPA determines the apprenticeship grade of:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The independent assessor must individually grade the project report and presentation with questions according to the requirements set out in this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or both assessment methods, they must be awarded an overall EPA fail.

The apprentice must achieve at least a pass in both assessment methods to achieve an overall EPA pass. To achieve an overall EPA distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in the project report and presentation with questions, and a pass in the MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Project report and presentation with questions MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2 Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one or both assessment methods, they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 2 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 6 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements 
  • undertake the EPA  

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA 
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan 
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis 
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:  

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner 
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO) 
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship 
  • understand the occupational standard 
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA 
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan 
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working 
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA  
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading 
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA 
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible 
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer 
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace 
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders 
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes 
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used) 
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually) 
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy 
  • verify the identity of the apprentice  
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan 
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA 
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation 
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan 
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • attend induction training 
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship  
  • make the grading decisions 
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner 
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 
  • assess the project report and presentation with questions, as determined by the EPA plan
  • assess the KSBs assigned to the project report and presentation with questions, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must: 

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard 
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan 
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning 
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA 

Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA)

For 'MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2, as a minimum the MCA should:

  • administer applications
  • administer and grade the assessment
  • issue a certificate of competency to apprentices who pass the assessment
  • inform the EPAO of the outcome of the assessment
  • inform the Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education of any changes to the assessment that would impact on the delivery of this EPA

Apprentice - MCA additional requirements

The apprentice:

  • must be 18 years of age to satisfy MCA requirements for certification. They may, however, start the EPA process before they are 18 years of age, if they will be 18 or over at the point of certification

EPAO - MCA additional requirements

The EPAO must:

  • ensure that assessment method 2 is booked with the MCA, once the apprentice has achieved a minimum of a pass in assessment method 1

Training providers - MCA additional requirements

To deliver this apprenticeship's on-programme training, the training provider must be:

  • on the ESFA register of apprenticeship training providers (RoATP); and
  • an MCA-approved small vessel chief engineer training centre

Details of centres approved by the MCA to deliver training modules and short course training programmes are available from the MCA’s Seafarer Services Branch.

Training providers who want to seek approval to deliver small vessel chief engineer training should contact the MCA.

Training providers will need to meet the requirements of MIN 524 Annex E, or subsequent M-Notice.

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to how the EPAO ensures valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. The EPAO must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section.

They must also:

  • have effective and rigorous quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 4 gained in the last 2 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship for an independent assessor:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • using the employer’s premises

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.



Mapping of KSBs to assessment methods

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Understand the reason for determining voyage needs; fuel, lubricants, water, stores, expendables. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K2

Understand the necessity for routine maintenance and the reasons for maintaining records of machinery and its performance. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K3

Understand the consequences of sailing with certain items of machinery inoperative and the risks involved in doing so. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K4

Understand the (Chief Engineer’s) responsibilities and duties concerning bunkering or refuelling operations. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K5

The methods of dealing with fire on board ship. Prevention of the spread of fire. The organisation and direction of fire-fighting and lifesaving parties. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K6

Care and management of steering systems and bow thrusters. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K7

Care and management of pumping systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K8

Care and management of oily water separator equipment. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K9

(a) Construction, maintenance and operation of fire-fighting equipment, (b) Fire detection and prevention. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K10

(a) Codes of safe working practices, risk assessment, permit to work (entry into enclosed space, hot work, electrical work), (b) The dangers of entering enclosed spaces. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K11

Routine operational duties and the effect of legislation on engine room operations. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K12

Working principles and constructional details of marine engines, gears, clutches and ancillary equipment. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K13

Fuel oil, lubrication oil, and cooling systems of marine engines together with ancillary systems including filters, pumps, heat exchangers and controls. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K14

(a) Methods of manoeuvring, including bridge control systems, variable pitch propellers and bow thrusters, (b) Emergency controls. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K15

Working principles and constructional details of air compressors, air receivers and associated equipment. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K16

Operational testing and fault rectification of basic control systems and alarm panels. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K17

Safe and efficient operation and maintenance of marine engines and propulsion systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K18

Knowledge of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annexes and implementations. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K19

Principles of stability, water tight and watertight integrity, free surface effect and reserve buoyancy. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K20

Basic understanding of International Safety Management (ISM). [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K21

Principles and constructional details of sensing, monitoring and measuring devices associated with marine equipment. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K22

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of propulsive transmission systems, including thrust and shaft bearings, stern tubes and propellers. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K23

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of bilge and ballast pumps, pumping and priming systems including pollution prevention equipment and systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K24

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of steering and stabilizing systems including bow thrusters. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K25

Principles involved with operation, testing and maintenance of control and alarm systems associated with automatic operation of marine steam plant. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K26

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of: a. marine diesel engines (medium and high speed); gearing systems and clutches; b. starting and reversing systems; c. cooling and lubrication systems; d. fuel oil preparation systems; e. air compressors, receivers and associated equipment; f. auxiliary diesel engines and associated equipment; g. control and alarm systems associated with automatic operation of a diesel plant. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K27

Methods of assessment of power output and diesel plant efficiency and action to be taken to maintain safe and efficient operation of plant. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K28

Methods of testing fuel oil, lubrication oil and cooling water and action to be taken to maintain safe conditions. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K29

Types of information issued by the MCA with respect to safety at sea. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K30

Responsibilities of a chief engineer officer with regard to the control and prevention of fire: a. precautions against fire or explosions, explosive mixtures and sources of ignition; b. principles and methods of fire prevention, detection and extinction in all areas of a ship; c. principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of fire detection and extinguishing systems; d. principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of fire pumps and associated pumping systems; e. control and organization of fire and damage control parties. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K31

Knowledge and understanding of applications and maintenance of ISM codes and system. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K32

Organisation and control procedures necessary for the safe and efficient operation in the Unmanned Maritime Systems (UMS) mode. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K33

Principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of: a. alternators, generators, motors, switch gear and batteries; b. ac and dc distribution systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K34

Fault finding and rectification of faults in electrical systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K35

Administration duties of a chief engineer associated with: a. organisation and training of staff for normal and emergency duties; b. organisation of temporary and permanent repairs and surveys – Company approval and Classification society. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K36

Ensuring ship is in seaworthy condition prior to sailing taking into account nature of voyage. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K37

Dry docking, hull surveys and repairs. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
K38

The introduction of increased automation, artificial intelligence, and emerging technologies in the maritime sector.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K39

Project management techniques: setting objectives, planning and monitoring.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K40

Commercial awareness; costing and budgeting principles.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K41

Resource management considerations: cost, quality, safety, security, and environmental impact.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K42

Problem solving tools and techniques: root cause analysis.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K43

Marine industry terminology.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K44

Communication techniques: verbal and written.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K45

Report writing techniques.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K46

Documentation requirements and importance.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K47

Information technology: word processing, spreadsheets, e-mail, and presentation. IT applications for technical reporting.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K48

Sustainability: current practices and developments in the sector.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K49

Ethical practices.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
K50

Equality, diversity, and inclusion awareness.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Take personal emergency action onboard a vessel. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S2

Respond to emergencies onboard a vessel. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S3

Take control of survival craft and rescue boats. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S4

Take charge of an engine room watch. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S5

Prepare and operate vessel propulsion machinery and ancillary systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S6

Operate vessel ancillaries and service machinery. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S7

Operate and adjust vessel electrical systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S8

Carry out maintenance to vessel electrical machinery and systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S9

Carry out maintenance to vessel mechanical machinery and systems. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S10

Maintain personal health, safety and environmental standards onboard a vessel. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S11

Maintain safe, legal and effective working practices onboard a vessel. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S12

Maintain and enhance productive working relationships onboard a vessel. [MCA]

Back to Grading
MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2
S13

Identify costs and create a draft budget for sign-off.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S14

Apply project management techniques.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S15

Identify, organise, and use resources to complete tasks.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S16

Diagnose problems. Resolve or escalate problems in line with responsibilities.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S17

Review work to identify improvements.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S18

Communicate verbally and in writing with others for example, colleagues and contractors onboard or ashore.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S19

Complete documentation for example, machinery space logbook and oil record book.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S20

Write technical reports.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
S21

Use information technology for example, word processing, spreadsheets, email, and presentation.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Promote and adopt a safety culture.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
B2

Committed to protecting the marine environment from pollution.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
B3

Take personal responsibility for their actions.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
B4

Committed to quality and continuous improvement.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
B5

Role-model equality and diversity expectations and requirements.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions
B6

Actively pursue professional development to maintain and enhance their competence.

Back to Grading
Project report and presentation with questions

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Project report and presentation with questions - Project

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Project management
K39 K40 K50
S13 S14
B1 B3 B5

Project management techniques: setting objectives, planning and monitoring. (K39)

Commercial awareness; costing and budgeting principles. (K40)

Equality, diversity, and inclusion awareness. (K50)

Identify costs and create a draft budget for sign-off. (S13)

Apply project management techniques. (S14)

Promote and adopt a safety culture. (B1)

Take personal responsibility for their actions. (B3)

Role-model equality and diversity expectations and requirements. (B5)

Resource management
K41 K48 K49
S15
B2

Resource management considerations: cost, quality, safety, security, and environmental impact. (K41)

Sustainability: current practices and developments in the sector. (K48)

Ethical practices. (K49)

Identify, organise, and use resources to complete tasks. (S15)

Committed to protecting the marine environment from pollution. (B2)

Problem solving
K42
S16

Problem solving tools and techniques: root cause analysis. (K42)

Diagnose problems. Resolve or escalate problems in line with responsibilities. (S16)

N/A

Continuous improvement
K38
S17
B4

The introduction of increased automation, artificial intelligence, and emerging technologies in the maritime sector. (K38)

Review work to identify improvements. (S17)

Committed to quality and continuous improvement. (B4)

Communication and information technology
K43 K44 K45 K47
S18 S20 S21

Marine industry terminology. (K43)

Communication techniques: verbal and written. (K44)

Report writing techniques. (K45)

Information technology: word processing, spreadsheets, e-mail, and presentation. IT applications for technical reporting. (K47)

Communicate verbally and in writing with others for example, colleagues and contractors onboard or ashore. (S18)

Write technical reports. (S20)

Use information technology for example, word processing, spreadsheets, email, and presentation. (S21)

N/A

Documentation
K46
S19

Documentation requirements and importance. (K46)

Complete documentation for example, machinery space logbook and oil record book. (S19)

N/A

Continued professional development (CPD)


B6

N/A

N/A

Actively pursue professional development to maintain and enhance their competence. (B6)

MCA oral examination for Chief Engineer Officer, less than 9,000 kW, less than 3,000 GT, unlimited area, STCW Convention Regulation III/2 - Discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
MCA
K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21 K22 K23 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37
S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12

Understand the reason for determining voyage needs; fuel, lubricants, water, stores, expendables. [MCA] (K1)

Understand the necessity for routine maintenance and the reasons for maintaining records of machinery and its performance. [MCA] (K2)

Understand the consequences of sailing with certain items of machinery inoperative and the risks involved in doing so. [MCA] (K3)

Understand the (Chief Engineer’s) responsibilities and duties concerning bunkering or refuelling operations. [MCA] (K4)

The methods of dealing with fire on board ship. Prevention of the spread of fire. The organisation and direction of fire-fighting and lifesaving parties. [MCA] (K5)

Care and management of steering systems and bow thrusters. [MCA] (K6)

Care and management of pumping systems. [MCA] (K7)

Care and management of oily water separator equipment. [MCA] (K8)

(a) Construction, maintenance and operation of fire-fighting equipment, (b) Fire detection and prevention. [MCA] (K9)

(a) Codes of safe working practices, risk assessment, permit to work (entry into enclosed space, hot work, electrical work), (b) The dangers of entering enclosed spaces. [MCA] (K10)

Routine operational duties and the effect of legislation on engine room operations. [MCA] (K11)

Working principles and constructional details of marine engines, gears, clutches and ancillary equipment. [MCA] (K12)

Fuel oil, lubrication oil, and cooling systems of marine engines together with ancillary systems including filters, pumps, heat exchangers and controls. [MCA] (K13)

(a) Methods of manoeuvring, including bridge control systems, variable pitch propellers and bow thrusters, (b) Emergency controls. [MCA] (K14)

Working principles and constructional details of air compressors, air receivers and associated equipment. [MCA] (K15)

Operational testing and fault rectification of basic control systems and alarm panels. [MCA] (K16)

Safe and efficient operation and maintenance of marine engines and propulsion systems. [MCA] (K17)

Knowledge of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annexes and implementations. [MCA] (K18)

Principles of stability, water tight and watertight integrity, free surface effect and reserve buoyancy. [MCA] (K19)

Basic understanding of International Safety Management (ISM). [MCA] (K20)

Principles and constructional details of sensing, monitoring and measuring devices associated with marine equipment. [MCA] (K21)

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of propulsive transmission systems, including thrust and shaft bearings, stern tubes and propellers. [MCA] (K22)

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of bilge and ballast pumps, pumping and priming systems including pollution prevention equipment and systems. [MCA] (K23)

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of steering and stabilizing systems including bow thrusters. [MCA] (K24)

Principles involved with operation, testing and maintenance of control and alarm systems associated with automatic operation of marine steam plant. [MCA] (K25)

Principles involved with the operation, testing and maintenance of: a. marine diesel engines (medium and high speed); gearing systems and clutches; b. starting and reversing systems; c. cooling and lubrication systems; d. fuel oil preparation systems; e. air compressors, receivers and associated equipment; f. auxiliary diesel engines and associated equipment; g. control and alarm systems associated with automatic operation of a diesel plant. [MCA] (K26)

Methods of assessment of power output and diesel plant efficiency and action to be taken to maintain safe and efficient operation of plant. [MCA] (K27)

Methods of testing fuel oil, lubrication oil and cooling water and action to be taken to maintain safe conditions. [MCA] (K28)

Types of information issued by the MCA with respect to safety at sea. [MCA] (K29)

Responsibilities of a chief engineer officer with regard to the control and prevention of fire: a. precautions against fire or explosions, explosive mixtures and sources of ignition; b. principles and methods of fire prevention, detection and extinction in all areas of a ship; c. principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of fire detection and extinguishing systems; d. principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of fire pumps and associated pumping systems; e. control and organization of fire and damage control parties. [MCA] (K30)

Knowledge and understanding of applications and maintenance of ISM codes and system. [MCA] (K31)

Organisation and control procedures necessary for the safe and efficient operation in the Unmanned Maritime Systems (UMS) mode. [MCA] (K32)

Principles of the operation, testing and maintenance of: a. alternators, generators, motors, switch gear and batteries; b. ac and dc distribution systems. [MCA] (K33)

Fault finding and rectification of faults in electrical systems. [MCA] (K34)

Administration duties of a chief engineer associated with: a. organisation and training of staff for normal and emergency duties; b. organisation of temporary and permanent repairs and surveys – Company approval and Classification society. [MCA] (K35)

Ensuring ship is in seaworthy condition prior to sailing taking into account nature of voyage. [MCA] (K36)

Dry docking, hull surveys and repairs. [MCA] (K37)

Take personal emergency action onboard a vessel. [MCA] (S1)

Respond to emergencies onboard a vessel. [MCA] (S2)

Take control of survival craft and rescue boats. [MCA] (S3)

Take charge of an engine room watch. [MCA] (S4)

Prepare and operate vessel propulsion machinery and ancillary systems. [MCA] (S5)

Operate vessel ancillaries and service machinery. [MCA] (S6)

Operate and adjust vessel electrical systems. [MCA] (S7)

Carry out maintenance to vessel electrical machinery and systems. [MCA] (S8)

Carry out maintenance to vessel mechanical machinery and systems. [MCA] (S9)

Maintain personal health, safety and environmental standards onboard a vessel. [MCA] (S10)

Maintain safe, legal and effective working practices onboard a vessel. [MCA] (S11)

Maintain and enhance productive working relationships onboard a vessel. [MCA] (S12)

N/A

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Employers involved in creating the standard: Bibby Marine, Boluda Towage Europe, Border Force, Dalby Offshore, Forth Ports Towage (Tilbury), Gardline, Holyhead Towing, Portland Harbour Authority, Serco, SMS Towage, Solent Towage/Ostensjo, Svitzer

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.0 Approved for delivery 01/06/2022 Not set Not set

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