We use cookies to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. See more about our use of cookies.

Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education logo

Scenic artist

This apprenticeship is in development and is subject to change

Why is this apprenticeship not ready for delivery?

An apprenticeship is only available for delivery when both the standard and assessment plan is approved and a funding band (core government contribution) has been assigned to the standard.

How can I get involved?

If you'd like to get involved and contribute to the development of this apprenticeship, please read about developing standards and assessment plans. You can email the trailblazer contact using the details on this page.

Key information

  1. Status: In development
  2. Ticked Proposal approved
    Ticked Occupational standard approved
    Ticked End-point assessment plan approved
  3. Reference: ST0916
  4. Level: 3
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 21 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Route: Creative and design
  8. Date updated: 05/12/2022
  9. EQA provider: Ofqual
  10. Review:

    This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in theatres, animation, TV, film and commercial workshops who undertake work for these organisations.

Scenic artists, depending on the employer requirements and contracts, also undertake work to develop exhibitions, support festivals and immersive theatre events, work for interior decorators, theme parks and site-specific events. The broad purpose of the occupation is to discuss the scenic art requirements with the designer or scenic manager to translate their vision into the reality of what the audience sees. These discussions may also include health, safety and environmental considerations, schedule, budget, and practical issues e.g. touring. In film and TV productions, the construction workers, which include scenic artists, play a vital role in determining the look of the production; they are responsible for building, painting and plastering sets for productions.

They may work from scale models, and pictorial references including technical drawings provided by the designer, photographs, textiles, and other items which convey aspects of the design concept. The scenic artist will then work to produce samples of the various scenic finishes needed, such as colour, textures, and style of painting. Once approved by the designer and if within budget, the scenic requirements can then be fully realised in collaboration with the production team.

Scenic artists ensure finish, repair and modification is correctly and efficiently carried out in accordance with safe working and manufacturing practices. They may be required to modify and complete works during performances or productions if alterations or repairs are required.

Scenic artists are largely based in a workshop environment which could include, small and large commercial workshops, and theatre companies. They may work in various other working venues and environments including outdoor work. They will also be required to work onstage or on-site, during rehearsals and at other specific times. This may mean working unsociable hours such as evenings, weekends and overnight during fit up, production and live event periods.

They use a wide variety of equipment such as drawing materials, power tools and paintbrushes. They are expected to work individually as well as within teams depending on the organisation’s size and structure. Scenic artists may at times be required to manoeuvre heavy objects, and work at height. In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with members of the creative team which includes production managers, set designers, design assistants, scenic managers and directors. In TV and film, scenic artists are part of the construction department.

They typically report to the head of department, workshop manager or their deputies.

A scenic artist will liaise with other members of technical departments such as construction (if not part of the same department), props masters, wardrobe, sound and lighting and stage supervisors. In a wider context, they may interact with producers, site managers, contractors, and potentially with occupational health, human resources, IT and health and safety. An employee in this occupation will be responsible for preparing and finishing scenery to meet the design brief. They must work from designs and pictorial references provided by a set designer.

Scenic artists will either work independently or with others to achieve the objectives of the project, including timescales and costings. They must adhere to health, safety, environmental and sustainability policies, procedures and regulations including the safe use of materials. They will effectively control personal material use, taking into account material sustainability and environmental impact to minimise waste and increase efficiency. They must maintain and update their knowledge regarding all matters concerning materials, products and technique.

They will adapt their approach to ensure they select the most efficient method of attaining the project outcome. They are trusted to work unsupervised under the brief of their supervisor. 

Typical job titles include:

Scenic artist Scenic construction worker Scenic painter Set decorator Set painter

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Interpret the creative design brief and consider how to implement to deliver the scenery or set in line with the production requirements.

K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K18 K20 K24

S1 S7 S8 S17

B1 B3 B4 B5

Duty 2 Undertake research (for example period architectural detailing, genre, artist styles and methods) to support the delivery of the design brief.

K4 K5 K6 K17

S1 S4 S8 S17

B5 B6

Duty 3 Interpret the design requirements and demonstrate draughting skills using a range of techniques including scaling up, technical and freehand drawing.

K3 K9 K10 K11 K12 K14 K16 K23

S2 S3 S8 S17 S18

B3 B5 B6 B8

Duty 4 Develop working samples from designs, technical drawings and pictorial references provided by the set designer, in collaboration with the creative team, in order to produce the finished set.

K1 K2 K3 K5 K7 K8 K9 K13 K14 K18 K20 K22

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S11 S12 S17 S18 S19

B3 B4 B5 B7 B8

Duty 5 Undertake the realisation of all scenic finishes required using a wide range of techniques, materials and processes. These include, faux finishes, 3D textures and painting.

K1 K2 K3 K7 K8 K9 K13 K14 K20 K22 K23 K24

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S11 S12 S13

B1 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8

Duty 6 Maintain and update tools and equipment in line with manufacturer’s specifications and regulation requirements.

K14 K21 K22 K23 K24

S7 S9 S15 S16 S19

B1 B8

Duty 7 Repair, refurbish and maintain scenery during a production, and restore it to the original design brief wherever possible and as required.

K11 K20 K22

S1 S7 S8 S10 S13 S14 S17 S19

B1 B7 B8

Duty 8 Collaborate with scenic carpenters and scenic metalworkers to ensure the production schedule is achieved within the timescale.

K11 K14 K18 K19 K20 K24

S1 S7 S9 S10 S14 S17 S19

B1 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8

Duty 9 Contribute to the costing processes for new projects and refurbishments of existing ones.

K5 K11 K12 K13 K14 K16 K18

S1 S7 S8 S17 S18 S19

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8

Duty 10 Maintain knowledge about new and improved methods, materials or working practices up to date.

K13 K14 K20 K22 K23 K24

S7 S10 S15 S16 S17 S19

B1 B3 B8


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Colour theory- identify and fully understand the main categories in colour theory. The colour wheel, that consists of primary, secondary and tertiary, colour harmony, and provides the context of how colour is used within the role, for example accurate colour matching. Back to Duty

K2: Painting theory for example colour mixing, product use, wood-graining, marbling, sign writing, trompe l’oeil, spray techniques, painting on various materials, appliques and cut-cloths, faux finishes, peeling and cracked paint. Back to Duty

K3: Basic geometry, namely sizes, shapes, positions, angles and dimensions of objects such as squares, circles and triangles. Back to Duty

K4: Art history - recognise the differences in styles and periods in the story of world art, including that of notable historical and contemporary individual artists. Back to Duty

K5: History of architecture and interiors - recognise the different styles and periods , including that of notable buildings and interiors. Back to Duty

K6: Principles of portraiture - understand the processes of portrait artists including anatomical drawing of the human figure, painting techniques such as fresco or oil painting in order to reproduce in scenic terms. Back to Duty

K7: Carving and sculptural techniques for example polycarving and scrimming. Back to Duty

K8: Texture techniques for example different texture products, additives and adhesives, accurate replication of given building materials, rendering of natural and man-made surfaces, ageing and distressing. Back to Duty

K9: Recognise the differences in preparation for and working on a variety of surfaces. Back to Duty

K10: The rules of perspective drawing to suggest three dimensions on a two-dimensional surface. Back to Duty

K11: Understand design requirements, from discussion with the head of department, production manager and designer or director, including those related to concept and finish, using drawings, photographs or models. Back to Duty

K12: The design process including model boxes and scale. Back to Duty

K13: Recognise materials and products, for example paints, glazes, textures, adhesives, canvases. Back to Duty

K14: Impact of health and safety legislation, regulations, policies and procedures including, safe working practice COSHH regulations, manual handling and risk assessments. Back to Duty

K15: Impact of environmental legislation - the importance of environmental responsibilities within the role for example the Refuse Disposal Act 1978 and Control of Pollution (Amendment) Act 1989 and the sustainability of resources. Back to Duty

K16: CAD (computer aided design) and creative software to develop and create images and adapt those provided by the designer or design brief. Back to Duty

K17: Research techniques to be able to identify requirements from the design brief. Back to Duty

K18: Project management principles to supervise projects including costing processes. Back to Duty

K19: The broad intent of the organisation or productions policies and procedures including diversity and inclusivity. Back to Duty

K20: The objectives and requirements of other craft skills and activities in theatre stages and art departments and their relationship with scenery and props. Back to Duty

K21: Maintenance and storage requirements of tools and equipment used to create the scenery or set for example mobile access equipment, hand tools, hoists and lifts. Back to Duty

K22: The safe use of tools and equipment for example hand tools, hoists and lifts. Back to Duty

K23: Approaches to keeping knowledge up to and sharing skills with work colleagues. Back to Duty

K24: Accurate industry terminology. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Liaise with designers and production managers to create or adapt work in accordance with requirements. Back to Duty

S2: Use drawing equipment including a scale rule, measuring stick, straight edge, stencil making, pounce making and projection. Back to Duty

S3: Draw using methods such as plotting, gridding, freehand and figurative. Back to Duty

S4: Use painting theory for example colour mixing, product use, wood-graining, marbling, sign writing, trompe l’oeil, spray techniques, painting on various materials, appliques and cut-cloths, faux finishes, peeling and cracked paint. Back to Duty

S5: Use carving and sculptural techniques for example polycarving, scrimming. Back to Duty

S6: Apply texture techniques for example different texture products, additives and adhesives, accurate replication of given building materials, rendering of natural and man-made surfaces, ageing and distressing. Back to Duty

S7: Use industry practices including accurate industry terminology and safe working practices. Back to Duty

S8: Interpret the design process including model boxes and scale. Back to Duty

S9: Use tools and equipment for example hand tools, hoists and lifts. Back to Duty

S10: Operate and use mobile access equipment. Back to Duty

S11: Undertake work on different surfaces. Back to Duty

S12: Undertake the hanging and stretching out of cloths and wallpaper. Back to Duty

S13: Undertake repair and modification, and finish activities as required and in accordance with safe working and manufacturing practices. Back to Duty

S14: Modify any completed works during production if alterations are required by the director or designer. Back to Duty

S15: Demonstrate and share best practice with the team. Back to Duty

S16: Use IT systems to facilitate administrative, communications and online requirements for example diaries, blogs, schedules, budgets, costings and progress reports. Back to Duty

S17: Communicate with others including understanding and responding to instructions and briefings. Back to Duty

S18: Develop drawings, paintings, colour samples etc. in accordance with a design concept. Back to Duty

S19: Maintain safe working practices and efficient use of hand tools, machinery, materials and resources. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Puts safety first. Back to Duty

B2: Takes ownership and responsibility for actions. Back to Duty

B3: Positively adapts to change, is flexible and looks for the benefits when changes occur. Back to Duty

B4: Is organised and timely in work delivery. Back to Duty

B5: Solves problems within own area of responsibility. Back to Duty

B6: Remains focused, balancing competing priorities to achieve required outcomes. Back to Duty

B7: Team-focused and works effectively with colleagues and others. Back to Duty

B8: Committed to keeping up to date with employer needs, industry best practice and own professional development. Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the scenic artist apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Scenic artist apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 21 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a scenic artist. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - practical assessment with questioning:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme (typically 21 months)
The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence.

End-point assessment gateway
The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the occupational standard as a scenic artist
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

For the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment (typically 3 months)
Grades available for each assessment method:

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Practical assessment with questioning

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction
Re-sits and re-takes



  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: pass
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically 3 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically 6 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 3 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think their apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard. The apprentice will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit Portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 15 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records, for example:
  • workplace policies and procedures
  • 2D painted project such as a portrait, images of 3D carving project work, use of digital editing software
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the interview. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the interview. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the interview, an independent assessor asks the apprentice questions.The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

It allows for the assessment of KSBs that may not naturally occur during the practical assessment with questions as described in the document.

It allows for the testing of responses when there may be a range of potential answers.

It is cost-effective, as whilst seeking assurance of competence across a range of KSBs, it does not require the independent assessor to directly observe all of them thus reducing their time cost as well as the cost of materials.

Delivery

The interview must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the interview.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to cover the following groups of KSBs as detailed in the grading descriptors and mapping of knowledge, skills and behaviours at the end of this document

  • design requirements
  • history
  • colour
  • drawings
  • carving or sculptures
  • personal development
  • change
  • working with others

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days notice of the interview.

The independent assessor must have at least 1 week(s) to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the interview.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The interview must last for 65 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the interview by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 12 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required. The independent assessor must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The interview must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The interview can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The interview should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation, training, and moderation.

Practical assessment with questioning

Overview

In a practical assessment with questions, an independent assessor observes the apprentice completing a task or series of tasks set by the EPAO. The EPAO decides where it takes place. The assessment environment must closely relate to the apprentice’s natural working environment. This allows the apprentice to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. 

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

It makes use of facilities that are already familiar to the apprentice or closely relate to their natural working environment. This allows apprentices to perform at their best.

It allows for consistency of activities to be completed and efficiency in scheduling.

A practical assessment has been selected as this enables all apprentices to have the same opportunity to demonstrate their ability against the KSBs.

Delivery

The practical assessment with questioning must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the practical assessment with questioning.

The independent assessor must only observe one apprentice at a time to ensure quality and rigour. They must be as unobtrusive as possible.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days notice of the . practical assessment with questioning

The practical assessment with questioning must take 15 hours.

The independent assessor can increase the time of the practical assessment with questioning by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete a task or respond to a question if necessary.

The practical assessment with questioning cannot be split, other than for comfort breaks or to allow apprentices to move from one location to another. Where breaks occur, they will not count towards the total EPA time.

EPAOs must manage invigilation of the apprentice during the assessment, to maintain security of the EPA, in line with their malpractice policy. This includes breaks and moving between locations during the working day.

The independent assessor must explain to the apprentice the format and timescales of the practical assessment with questioning before it starts. This does not count towards the assessment time.

The independent assessor must observe the following during the practical assessment.

The following are examples of assessment brief titles:

  • Texture: create a piece of realistic textured surface using given reference, to contain different products and materials (maximum of 3) such as brick,concrete or tile
  • Scenic Painting: create a piece of scenic painting using given reference that can be drawn up and painted to completion.
  • Trompe L’oeil: interior or exterior painted piece: create a trompe l’oeil painted interior or exterior section

This list is not exhaustive and the final assessment brief for each apprentice needs to enable the apprentice to be assessed against the following:

Themes and KSBs to be assessed

  • Painting theory K2, S4.
  • Drawings K3, K10, S2.
  • Materials and textures K8, K13, S6.
  • Surfaces K9, S11, S12.
  • Health, safety and the environment K14, K15, S7, B1.
  • Tools and equipment K21, S9, S10, S20, B4, B5.

The following activities must be observed during the practical assessment

  • Use painting theory to demonstrate 3 different techniques and applications.
  • Use drawing equipment to demonstrate basic geometry and 3D perspective.
  • Use different products and 3 different materials to demonstrate accurate replication of one natural and one man-made texture.
  • Prepare surface and demonstrate hanging and stretching out of cloth and wallpaper.
  • Create an outcome to dimension of 8’ x 4’ / 2400mm x 1220mm.
  • Demonstrate safe working practices.
  • Use and maintain tools and equipment.

These activities provide the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The independent assessor must ask questions. The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to allow for the testing of knowledge, skills and behaviours where an opportunity to fully demonstrate them did not occur.

It will also allow an opportunity for the assessor to ask clarification questions about the assessed KSBs, demonstrated in the assessment. .

Questions must be asked after the practical. The total duration of the practical is 15 hours and the time for questioning is included in the overall assessment time. The total time for the practical element is 14 hours. The time allocated for questioning is 1 minutes.

The independent assessor must ask at least 8 questions. The independent assessor must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor can ask follow-up questions to clarify answers given by the apprentice. These questions are in addition to the above set number of questions for the practical assessment with questioning and should be kept to a minimum..

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs observed
  • The apprentice’s answers to questions
  • KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The practical assessment and responses to questions must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade. 

Assessment location

The practical assessment with questioning will take place in a simulated environment selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises). The simulated environment must relate to the apprentice’s natural work environment. Equipment and resources needed for the practical assessment with questioning must be provided by the EPAO, who can liaise with the employer to provide these.

Questioning that occurs after the practical assessment with questioning should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.  

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the practical assessment with questioning:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Grading

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Design requirements
K11 K12 K16 K17 S8 B2 B6

Describes how they undertake research to interpret the design requirements including those related to concept and finish, using drawings, photographs or models.

K11, K17

Describes how they use creative software and CAD, to enable the adaptation, development and/or creation of images alongside those provided by the designer or design brief.

K16, S1

Explains the design process including model boxes and scale.

K12, S8

Explains the impact of working under pressure to meet deadlines and taking responsibility for and ownership of actions.

B6, B2

Evaluates the impact of wrongly interpreting the design brief.

K11, S1

History
K4 K5

Describes how they use their knowledge to identify the differences in styles and periods in the story of world art, including that of notable historical and contemporary individual artists: the different styles and periods in world architecture and the history of interiors.

Liaise with designers and production managers to create and/or adapt work in line with requirements.

K4, K5

No distinction criteria for this descriptor.

Colour
K1 S18

Explains how they develop drawings, paintings, colour samples in accordance with a design concept using the main categories of colour theory and the colour wheel. 

K1, S19

Explains how they have reflected on and made changes to their approach to developing drawings, paintings, colour samples using the main categories of colour.

K1, S19

Drawings
K6 S3

Describes how they apply the principles of portraiture including anatomical drawing of the human figure, painting techniques using different methods  in order to reproduce in scenic terms.

K6, S3

Evaluates why the principles of portraiture are crucial to accurate replication of the processes of portrait artists.

K6

Carving/sculptures
K7 S5

Describes how they choose and use carving/sculptural techniques to meet design requirements.

K7, S5

Justifies the choice of carving/sculpture technique.

K7, S5

Personal development
K23 S15 B8

Describes how they keep their knowledge and skills up to date and share developments with their colleagues in the workplace.

K22, S15, B8

Justifies further personal development requirements.

K22

Change
S13 S14 B3

Explains how they undertake finish, repair and modification activities before and during a production in accordance with safe working and manufacturing practices.

S13, S14, B3

Justifies how they balance change requirements with working safely and in accordance with manufacturing practices.

S13, S14

Working with others
K18 K19 K20 S1 S16 S17 B7

Explains the project management principles they apply to supervise projects including costing processes and their use of IT systems to facilitate adminstration including preparing and updating paperwork, communications and online requirements.

K18, S16, S17          

Explains the broad intent of the organisation’s policies and procedures including towards diversity and inclusivity.

K19

Describes communicating with others including understanding and responding to instruction, being team focused and working well with others.

S18, B7

Explains the objectives and requirements of other craft skills and activities in productions and their relationship with scenery and props.

K20

Evaluates the impact on the organisation of not using project management principles, not following the organisation’s policies and procedures and not being aware of the role that other’s play in achieving the organisation’s objectives.

K18, K19, K20

Practical assessment with questioning

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Painting theory
K2 S4

Identifies and uses the correct aspect of painting theory to meet the design requirements.

K2, S4

Demonstrates skillful application, selecting appropriately to meet the design requirements and justifies their choice of painting theory aspects.

K2, S4

Drawings
K3 K10 S2

Selects and uses equipment including a scale rule, measuring stick, straight edge, stencil making, pounce making, and projections to produce drawings using basic geometry and the rules of perspective drawing to suggest three dimensions on a two-dimensional surface to reflect a given designer’s brief.

K3, K10, S2

Demonstrates accuracy and skillful application of equipment and tools mitigating re-work time and costs.  

S2

Materials and textures
K8 K13 S6

Chooses suitable texture techniques to apply to materials and products.

K8, K13, S6

Demonstrates skillful application of chosen texture techniques to materials and products with (considered or thoughtful) execution of the design requirements.

K8 S6

 

 

Surfaces
K9 S11 S12

Undertakes work on different surfaces, together with hanging and stretching out of cloths and wallpaper

K9, S11, S12

Demonstrates how they adapt their chosen technique to working on different surfaces with considered execution to meet the design requirements.

K9, S11

Health, safety and the environment
K14 K15 K24 S7 B1

Undertakes all work  in accordance with Health, Safety and Environmental Legislation, Regulations, policies and procedures including COSHH regulations, manual handling, risk assessments and meets sustainability requirements

B1, K14, K15

Uses correct Industry practices including accurate industry terminology

K23, S7

Evaluates the impact of not following Health, Safety and Environmental Legislation, Regulations, policies and procedures and sustainability requirements

K14, K15

Tools and equipment
K21 K22 S9 S10 S19 B4 B5

Identifies, safely and efficiently uses/operates tools and equipment including mobile access equipment, identifying their maintenance and storage requirements

K21, S9, S10, S20

Is organised and delivers work on time, solving problems within their own area of responsibility

B4, B5

No distinction criteria for this descriptor.

Overall EPA grading

The assessment methods contribute equally to the overall EPA pass grade.

Performance in the EPA will determine the apprenticeship grade of:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction

Independent assessors must individually grade the: interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence and practical assessment with questioning according to the requirements set out in this EPA plan.

EPAOs must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

An apprentice who fails one or more assessment method will be awarded an overall EPA fail.

An apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods to get an overall pass. In order to achieve an overall EPA ‘distinction’, apprentices must achieve a distinction in both assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods should be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Practical assessment with questioning Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

An apprentice who fails one or more assessment method(s) can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

An apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 6 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

An apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements 
  • undertake the EPA  

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA 
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan 
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis 
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:  

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner 
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO) 
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship 
  • understand the occupational standard 
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA 
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan 
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working 
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA  
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading 
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA 
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible 
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer 
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace 
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders 
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes 
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used) 
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually) 
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy 
  • verify the identity of the apprentice  
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan 
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA 
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation 
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan 
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • attend induction training 
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship  
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan  
  • assess the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan  
  • make the grading decisions 
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner 
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures 

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must: 

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard 
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan 
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning 
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA 

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to how the EPAO ensures valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. The EPAO must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section:

The EPAO must also:

  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 3 gained in the last 10 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider.

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

Professional body recognition is not relevant to this occupational apprenticeship.

Mapping of KSBs to assessment methods

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Colour theory- identify and fully understand the main categories in colour theory. The colour wheel, that consists of primary, secondary and tertiary, colour harmony, and provides the context of how colour is used within the role, for example accurate colour matching.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K2

Painting theory for example colour mixing, product use, wood-graining, marbling, sign writing, trompe l’oeil, spray techniques, painting on various materials, appliques and cut-cloths, faux finishes, peeling and cracked paint.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K3

Basic geometry, namely sizes, shapes, positions, angles and dimensions of objects such as squares, circles and triangles.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K4

Art history - recognise the differences in styles and periods in the story of world art, including that of notable historical and contemporary individual artists.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K5

History of architecture and interiors - recognise the different styles and periods , including that of notable buildings and interiors.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K6

Principles of portraiture - understand the processes of portrait artists including anatomical drawing of the human figure, painting techniques such as fresco or oil painting in order to reproduce in scenic terms.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K7

Carving and sculptural techniques for example polycarving and scrimming.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K8

Texture techniques for example different texture products, additives and adhesives, accurate replication of given building materials, rendering of natural and man-made surfaces, ageing and distressing.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K9

Recognise the differences in preparation for and working on a variety of surfaces.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K10

The rules of perspective drawing to suggest three dimensions on a two-dimensional surface.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K11

Understand design requirements, from discussion with the head of department, production manager and designer or director, including those related to concept and finish, using drawings, photographs or models.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K12

The design process including model boxes and scale.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K13

Recognise materials and products, for example paints, glazes, textures, adhesives, canvases.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K14

Impact of health and safety legislation, regulations, policies and procedures including, safe working practice COSHH regulations, manual handling and risk assessments.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K15

Impact of environmental legislation - the importance of environmental responsibilities within the role for example the Refuse Disposal Act 1978 and Control of Pollution (Amendment) Act 1989 and the sustainability of resources.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K16

CAD (computer aided design) and creative software to develop and create images and adapt those provided by the designer or design brief.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K17

Research techniques to be able to identify requirements from the design brief.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K18

Project management principles to supervise projects including costing processes.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19

The broad intent of the organisation or productions policies and procedures including diversity and inclusivity.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K20

The objectives and requirements of other craft skills and activities in theatre stages and art departments and their relationship with scenery and props.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K21

Maintenance and storage requirements of tools and equipment used to create the scenery or set for example mobile access equipment, hand tools, hoists and lifts.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K22

The safe use of tools and equipment for example hand tools, hoists and lifts.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
K23

Approaches to keeping knowledge up to and sharing skills with work colleagues.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K24

Accurate industry terminology.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Liaise with designers and production managers to create or adapt work in accordance with requirements.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S2

Use drawing equipment including a scale rule, measuring stick, straight edge, stencil making, pounce making and projection.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S3

Draw using methods such as plotting, gridding, freehand and figurative.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S4

Use painting theory for example colour mixing, product use, wood-graining, marbling, sign writing, trompe l’oeil, spray techniques, painting on various materials, appliques and cut-cloths, faux finishes, peeling and cracked paint.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S5

Use carving and sculptural techniques for example polycarving, scrimming.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S6

Apply texture techniques for example different texture products, additives and adhesives, accurate replication of given building materials, rendering of natural and man-made surfaces, ageing and distressing.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S7

Use industry practices including accurate industry terminology and safe working practices.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S8

Interpret the design process including model boxes and scale.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S9

Use tools and equipment for example hand tools, hoists and lifts.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S10

Operate and use mobile access equipment.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S11

Undertake work on different surfaces.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S12

Undertake the hanging and stretching out of cloths and wallpaper.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
S13

Undertake repair and modification, and finish activities as required and in accordance with safe working and manufacturing practices.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S14

Modify any completed works during production if alterations are required by the director or designer.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S15

Demonstrate and share best practice with the team.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S16

Use IT systems to facilitate administrative, communications and online requirements for example diaries, blogs, schedules, budgets, costings and progress reports.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S17

Communicate with others including understanding and responding to instructions and briefings.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S18

Develop drawings, paintings, colour samples etc. in accordance with a design concept.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S19

Maintain safe working practices and efficient use of hand tools, machinery, materials and resources.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Puts safety first.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
B2

Takes ownership and responsibility for actions.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3

Positively adapts to change, is flexible and looks for the benefits when changes occur.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B4

Is organised and timely in work delivery.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
B5

Solves problems within own area of responsibility.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questioning
B6

Remains focused, balancing competing priorities to achieve required outcomes.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B7

Team-focused and works effectively with colleagues and others.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B8

Committed to keeping up to date with employer needs, industry best practice and own professional development.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence - Discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Design requirements
K11 K12 K16 K17
S8
B2 B6

Understand design requirements, from discussion with the head of department, production manager and designer or director, including those related to concept and finish, using drawings, photographs or models. (K11)

The design process including model boxes and scale. (K12)

CAD (computer aided design) and creative software to develop and create images and adapt those provided by the designer or design brief. (K16)

Research techniques to be able to identify requirements from the design brief. (K17)

Interpret the design process including model boxes and scale. (S8)

Takes ownership and responsibility for actions. (B2)

Remains focused, balancing competing priorities to achieve required outcomes. (B6)

History
K4 K5

Art history - recognise the differences in styles and periods in the story of world art, including that of notable historical and contemporary individual artists. (K4)

History of architecture and interiors - recognise the different styles and periods , including that of notable buildings and interiors. (K5)

N/A

N/A

Colour
K1
S18

Colour theory- identify and fully understand the main categories in colour theory. The colour wheel, that consists of primary, secondary and tertiary, colour harmony, and provides the context of how colour is used within the role, for example accurate colour matching. (K1)

Develop drawings, paintings, colour samples etc. in accordance with a design concept. (S18)

N/A

Drawings
K6
S3

Principles of portraiture - understand the processes of portrait artists including anatomical drawing of the human figure, painting techniques such as fresco or oil painting in order to reproduce in scenic terms. (K6)

Draw using methods such as plotting, gridding, freehand and figurative. (S3)

N/A

Carving/sculptures
K7
S5

Carving and sculptural techniques for example polycarving and scrimming. (K7)

Use carving and sculptural techniques for example polycarving, scrimming. (S5)

N/A

Personal development
K23
S15
B8

Approaches to keeping knowledge up to and sharing skills with work colleagues. (K23)

Demonstrate and share best practice with the team. (S15)

Committed to keeping up to date with employer needs, industry best practice and own professional development. (B8)

Change

S13 S14
B3

N/A

Undertake repair and modification, and finish activities as required and in accordance with safe working and manufacturing practices. (S13)

Modify any completed works during production if alterations are required by the director or designer. (S14)

Positively adapts to change, is flexible and looks for the benefits when changes occur. (B3)

Working with others
K18 K19 K20
S1 S16 S17
B7

Project management principles to supervise projects including costing processes. (K18)

The broad intent of the organisation or productions policies and procedures including diversity and inclusivity. (K19)

The objectives and requirements of other craft skills and activities in theatre stages and art departments and their relationship with scenery and props. (K20)

Liaise with designers and production managers to create or adapt work in accordance with requirements. (S1)

Use IT systems to facilitate administrative, communications and online requirements for example diaries, blogs, schedules, budgets, costings and progress reports. (S16)

Communicate with others including understanding and responding to instructions and briefings. (S17)

Team-focused and works effectively with colleagues and others. (B7)

Practical assessment with questioning - PracticalAssessment

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Painting theory
K2
S4

Painting theory for example colour mixing, product use, wood-graining, marbling, sign writing, trompe l’oeil, spray techniques, painting on various materials, appliques and cut-cloths, faux finishes, peeling and cracked paint. (K2)

Use painting theory for example colour mixing, product use, wood-graining, marbling, sign writing, trompe l’oeil, spray techniques, painting on various materials, appliques and cut-cloths, faux finishes, peeling and cracked paint. (S4)

N/A

Drawings
K3 K10
S2

Basic geometry, namely sizes, shapes, positions, angles and dimensions of objects such as squares, circles and triangles. (K3)

The rules of perspective drawing to suggest three dimensions on a two-dimensional surface. (K10)

Use drawing equipment including a scale rule, measuring stick, straight edge, stencil making, pounce making and projection. (S2)

N/A

Materials and textures
K8 K13
S6

Texture techniques for example different texture products, additives and adhesives, accurate replication of given building materials, rendering of natural and man-made surfaces, ageing and distressing. (K8)

Recognise materials and products, for example paints, glazes, textures, adhesives, canvases. (K13)

Apply texture techniques for example different texture products, additives and adhesives, accurate replication of given building materials, rendering of natural and man-made surfaces, ageing and distressing. (S6)

N/A

Surfaces
K9
S11 S12

Recognise the differences in preparation for and working on a variety of surfaces. (K9)

Undertake work on different surfaces. (S11)

Undertake the hanging and stretching out of cloths and wallpaper. (S12)

N/A

Health, safety and the environment
K14 K15 K24
S7
B1

Impact of health and safety legislation, regulations, policies and procedures including, safe working practice COSHH regulations, manual handling and risk assessments. (K14)

Impact of environmental legislation - the importance of environmental responsibilities within the role for example the Refuse Disposal Act 1978 and Control of Pollution (Amendment) Act 1989 and the sustainability of resources. (K15)

Accurate industry terminology. (K24)

Use industry practices including accurate industry terminology and safe working practices. (S7)

Puts safety first. (B1)

Tools and equipment
K21 K22
S9 S10 S19
B4 B5

Maintenance and storage requirements of tools and equipment used to create the scenery or set for example mobile access equipment, hand tools, hoists and lifts. (K21)

The safe use of tools and equipment for example hand tools, hoists and lifts. (K22)

Use tools and equipment for example hand tools, hoists and lifts. (S9)

Operate and use mobile access equipment. (S10)

Maintain safe working practices and efficient use of hand tools, machinery, materials and resources. (S19)

Is organised and timely in work delivery. (B4)

Solves problems within own area of responsibility. (B5)

Contact us about this apprenticeship

Employers involved in creating the standard: Belgrade Theatre, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, Cardiff Theatrical Services, Disney, LADA/CC Skills, Maya Kazmarski (Freelance), National Theatre, Royal Exchange, Royal Opera House, Royal Shakespeare Company, Souvenir, The Really Useful Group, Welsh National Opera

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
Not set Not set Not set

Is this page useful?

Tell us about your visit

Help us improve our website