Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0027
  3. Version: 1.1
  4. Level: 6
  5. Degree: integrated degree
  6. Typical duration to gateway: 42 months
  7. Typical EPA period: 6 months
  8. Maximum funding: £27000
  9. Route: Engineering and manufacturing
  10. Date updated: 04/04/2024
  11. Approved for delivery: 12 November 2014
  12. Lars code: 12
  13. EQA provider: Office for Students
  14. Example progression routes:
  15. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
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Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Using engineering techniques to bring new products to life or redesign existing products.

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in cross sectors such as aerospace, automotive, motorsport, maritime and other product design engineering or manufacturing sectors. Employers may be directly involved in these activities or as a service provider, original equipment manufacturer or approved solutions provider in large or small to medium organisations providing services such as system design or development, product or component design or development. Products can form part of any mechanical, electrical or electromechanical systems, assemblies, components or complete integrated packages. Design and development of any products, whether they be concepts or approved for manufacture, must conform to appropriate standards and legislation, be environmentally and sustainability informed, and have a design considered approach to the end-to-end life cycle. To design or develop components, products or systems the engineer must be able to understand and apply core fundamentals in mathematics and scientific principles. It is typical for engineers in the industry to understand fundamentals principles such as calculus, equations, integration and differentiation, estimation, data collection and modelling, materials, international system of units, forces, mechanics and electrical and electronic theory. In a number of cases, engineers will have a deep understanding in a number of these areas.    

The broad purpose of the occupation is to be able to plan and lead projects or other relevant programmes of work that provides critical analysis, continuous improvement and problem solving to support research, design and development activities. As part of the development of new products and technology, designers and engineers have to analyse requirements and consider any legal implications and limitations to ensure conformity to national or international legislation, standards or directives as well as complying with customer requirements. It is imperative that material properties, capabilities and failures are understood and recognised to allow appropriate material selection. Product design and development engineers use a range of computer packages in order to complete the design or development activity efficiently and effectively including presenting their conceptual ideas. They utilise cutting edge technology to realise a project from initial concept studies to integrated analysis of a complete system. This is made possible with the introduction of advanced Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software packages and the availability of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software packages to support the design and development process. Complex, rigorous and extensive testing is utilised to reach the optimum of design and therefore can speed up the design and testing process through the use of simulation packages such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It is the job of the engineer to design, validate and maintain the mechanical, electrical or integrated system components to ensure they meet the required specification and customer requirements including taking into account how they may interact with other components or systems that could impact on factors such as safety, quality, reliability, performance, power, noise, vibration, harshness, speed, weight, heat generation, ingress of foreign bodies, signal interference and cyber security, are the day to day dealings of an engineer in this field. They must also consider environmental and sustainability when undertaking design and development activities such as material selection, recycling and reusability options The use of physical tools, software and simulation tools and utilising technologies for test, diagnostic and telemetry instruments are fundamental to carrying out tasks associated with designing, developing, testing, building, installing, verification testing and final release of products and any associated equipment or systems.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation will report to a senior manager or director and will normally be part of a multi-disciplinary team for example as a leader or member of a specialist project team that could include personnel from a range of functional areas such as senior design engineers, stress engineers, materials engineers, integration engineers, manufacturing engineers, quality engineers, production engineers, cost engineers, procurement managers or test engineers, maintenance engineer or installation and commissioning teams. This occupation can be plant based, office based, working in the field or a mixture of all of these areas. Some sectors may require the research or design engineers to work outside, such as at outdoor test facilities or in harsh environments.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for ensuring the design, development and optimisation of mechanical or electrical systems, component or product performance, equipment integration or reliability and compliance of systems. Product design and development engineers will also be responsible for identifying and supporting opportunities for cost savings, efficiency and continued improvement in a business environment. They will exercise considerable judgement and autonomy for the work they undertake coupled with a high-level of personal decision making and influence, setting out recommendations and potential options to the employer or customer.

Typical job titles include:

Composite engineer Design engineer Design engineer Development engineer Electric battery engineer Electrical engineer Electronics engineer Manufacturing/facilities engineer Product engineer Project engineer Reliability engineer Research and development engineer Research and technology engineer Simulation engineer Stress engineer Test engineer

Duties

  • Duty 1 Lead a safety culture in their defined work area at all times, ensuring their own safety and the safety of others.
  • Duty 2 Ensure that designs, developments or modifications or updates comply with national and/or international legislation, compliance testing or regulatory requirements.
  • Duty 3 Take responsibility for developing and maintaining of own technical knowledge.
  • Duty 4 Work independently or as part of a team to provide specialist research, design, development or modifications or updates to products, systems or components.
  • Duty 5 Determine the type and level of technical data and information required to complete the project or task outcome.
  • Duty 6 Plan, organise and manage resources such as human, equipment, components, data, to monitor progress, identify risks and any relevant mitigation to meet project or task outcomes.
  • Duty 7 Lead and deliver product, system or component design or development or modification projects or programmes of work to the agreed schedule, quality and budget.
  • Duty 8 Develop and maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders.
  • Duty 9 Determine the appropriate problem solving and diagnostic tools and techniques to be used and lead the problem-solving activity to enable development and modifications or updates of products, components or systems.
  • Duty 10 Identify and lead improvement activities.
  • Duty 11 Produce validated designs, developments, modifications or updates of products, components or systems through computer aided design, drawing or modelling, “live” testing or using virtual simulation software to industry standards.
  • Duty 12 Check all project or work programme documentation has been completed correctly and accurately to ensure it meets organisational compliance, industry standards or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and traceability requirements.
  • Duty 13 Produce technical documentation with applicable supporting data or information, as required, to inform project outcomes and decision making.
  • Duty 14 Identify and share good practice and work collaboratively.

Apprenticeship summary

ST0027, product design and development engineer (degree) level 6

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 42 months. The EPA period is typically 6 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, you must submit a portfolio of evidence

  • passed any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard

For the product design and development engineer (degree), the qualification required is:

BEng Honours or BSc Honours degree accredited by an Engineering Council licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI). Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on content from the outset.

Assessment methods



Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.


Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with IMechE for Incorporated Engineer

Please contact the professional body for more details.

This apprenticeship aligns with IET for Incorporated Engineer

Please contact the professional body for more details.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in cross sectors such as aerospace, automotive, motorsport, maritime and other product design engineering or manufacturing sectors. Employers may be directly involved in these activities or as a service provider, original equipment manufacturer or approved solutions provider in large or small to medium organisations providing services such as system design or development, product or component design or development. Products can form part of any mechanical, electrical or electromechanical systems, assemblies, components or complete integrated packages. Design and development of any products, whether they be concepts or approved for manufacture, must conform to appropriate standards and legislation, be environmentally and sustainability informed, and have a design considered approach to the end-to-end life cycle. To design or develop components, products or systems the engineer must be able to understand and apply core fundamentals in mathematics and scientific principles. It is typical for engineers in the industry to understand fundamentals principles such as calculus, equations, integration and differentiation, estimation, data collection and modelling, materials, international system of units, forces, mechanics and electrical and electronic theory. In a number of cases, engineers will have a deep understanding in a number of these areas.    

The broad purpose of the occupation is to be able to plan and lead projects or other relevant programmes of work that provides critical analysis, continuous improvement and problem solving to support research, design and development activities. As part of the development of new products and technology, designers and engineers have to analyse requirements and consider any legal implications and limitations to ensure conformity to national or international legislation, standards or directives as well as complying with customer requirements. It is imperative that material properties, capabilities and failures are understood and recognised to allow appropriate material selection. Product design and development engineers use a range of computer packages in order to complete the design or development activity efficiently and effectively including presenting their conceptual ideas. They utilise cutting edge technology to realise a project from initial concept studies to integrated analysis of a complete system. This is made possible with the introduction of advanced Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software packages and the availability of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software packages to support the design and development process. Complex, rigorous and extensive testing is utilised to reach the optimum of design and therefore can speed up the design and testing process through the use of simulation packages such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It is the job of the engineer to design, validate and maintain the mechanical, electrical or integrated system components to ensure they meet the required specification and customer requirements including taking into account how they may interact with other components or systems that could impact on factors such as safety, quality, reliability, performance, power, noise, vibration, harshness, speed, weight, heat generation, ingress of foreign bodies, signal interference and cyber security, are the day to day dealings of an engineer in this field. They must also consider environmental and sustainability when undertaking design and development activities such as material selection, recycling and reusability options The use of physical tools, software and simulation tools and utilising technologies for test, diagnostic and telemetry instruments are fundamental to carrying out tasks associated with designing, developing, testing, building, installing, verification testing and final release of products and any associated equipment or systems.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation will report to a senior manager or director and will normally be part of a multi-disciplinary team for example as a leader or member of a specialist project team that could include personnel from a range of functional areas such as senior design engineers, stress engineers, materials engineers, integration engineers, manufacturing engineers, quality engineers, production engineers, cost engineers, procurement managers or test engineers, maintenance engineer or installation and commissioning teams. This occupation can be plant based, office based, working in the field or a mixture of all of these areas. Some sectors may require the research or design engineers to work outside, such as at outdoor test facilities or in harsh environments.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for ensuring the design, development and optimisation of mechanical or electrical systems, component or product performance, equipment integration or reliability and compliance of systems. Product design and development engineers will also be responsible for identifying and supporting opportunities for cost savings, efficiency and continued improvement in a business environment. They will exercise considerable judgement and autonomy for the work they undertake coupled with a high-level of personal decision making and influence, setting out recommendations and potential options to the employer or customer.

Typical job titles include:

Composite engineer Design engineer Design engineer Development engineer Electric battery engineer Electrical engineer Electronics engineer Manufacturing/facilities engineer Product engineer Project engineer Reliability engineer Research and development engineer Research and technology engineer Simulation engineer Stress engineer Test engineer

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Lead a safety culture in their defined work area at all times, ensuring their own safety and the safety of others.

K1 K2 K12 K15 K16 K22

S6 S7 S8 S10 S12 S14

B1 B2 B8

Duty 2 Ensure that designs, developments or modifications or updates comply with national and/or international legislation, compliance testing or regulatory requirements.

K1 K2 K3 K7 K10 K12 K15 K16 K19

S2 S3 S5 S6 S7 S8 S10 S12 S14 S15

B1 B2 B3 B7 B8

Duty 3 Take responsibility for developing and maintaining of own technical knowledge.

K4 K5 K6 K8 K9 K14 K21 K24 K25

S10

B7 B8

Duty 4 Work independently or as part of a team to provide specialist research, design, development or modifications or updates to products, systems or components.

K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K13 K14 K15 K18 K19 K21 K23

S1 S2 S4 S5 S6 S8 S9 S10 S14 S15

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 5 Determine the type and level of technical data and information required to complete the project or task outcome.

K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K17 K20 K23 K25

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S8 S9 S11 S14 S15

B2 B3 B5

Duty 6 Plan, organise and manage resources such as human, equipment, components, data, to monitor progress, identify risks and any relevant mitigation to meet project or task outcomes.

K1 K2 K7 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K20 K22 K23 K24

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S15

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 7 Lead and deliver product, system or component design or development or modification projects or programmes of work to the agreed schedule, quality and budget.

K1 K2 K3 K6 K7 K10 K11 K12 K14 K15 K16 K17 K20 K21 K22 K23 K24

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S13 S15

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9

Duty 8 Develop and maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders.

K22 K24

S10

B4 B6 B8

Duty 9 Determine the appropriate problem solving and diagnostic tools and techniques to be used and lead the problem-solving activity to enable development and modifications or updates of products, components or systems.

K10 K13 K14

S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S10 S13 S14

B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 10 Identify and lead improvement activities.

K10 K11 K12 K13 K24

S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S14

B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8

Duty 11 Produce validated designs, developments, modifications or updates of products, components or systems through computer aided design, drawing or modelling, “live” testing or using virtual simulation software to industry standards.

K1 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K18 K19 K21 K23 K25

S1 S2 S3 S4 S6 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S15

B2 B3 B7

Duty 12 Check all project or work programme documentation has been completed correctly and accurately to ensure it meets organisational compliance, industry standards or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and traceability requirements.

K1 K2 K10 K12 K16 K17 K20

S4 S6 S7 S9 S15

B1 B2 B8

Duty 13 Produce technical documentation with applicable supporting data or information, as required, to inform project outcomes and decision making.

K17 K18 K19 K20 K23

S1 S2 S4 S5 S6 S7 S9 S10 S11 S13 S14 S15

B2 B8

Duty 14 Identify and share good practice and work collaboratively.

K10 K12 K14 K15 K17 K21

S5 S6 S14

B2 B4 B8

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Safety, environmental, sustainability and security standards associated with product, component or system design, development or modifications and the environments in which they reside. Back to Duty

K2: Hazardous environments and safe systems of work including the impact on the design specification, product, component, system development or modification. Back to Duty

K3: Constraints or limitations when designing, developing, testing or modifying a product, component or system. Back to Duty

K4: Principles and applications of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics relevant to product design or development. Back to Duty

K5: Principles and applications of mechanical dynamic systems relevant to product design or development. Back to Duty

K6: Factors that determine material selection relevant to the appropriate industry sector and product, component or system being designed or developed. Back to Duty

K7: Product design and development life cycle stages. Back to Duty

K8: Principles of mathematics and scientific methods including analytical techniques required to perform the product design or development engineer role such as evaluating statistical data, complex numbers and matrices. Back to Duty

K9: Principles and applications of electrical, electronic systems and components and digital engineering relevant to product design or development such as analogue to digital conversion, semiconductor devices and circuits, sensors and electric motors. Back to Duty

K10: Formats for collecting, presenting and storing data including how to select the best method for conveying complex information, and how to analyse the benefits and risks of each methodology. Back to Duty

K11: Commercial nature of projects and how any changes or delays impact on the business. Back to Duty

K12: Methods or techniques used for improving or enhancing the safety, reliability, quality, performance and sustainability of products, systems or components such as lean or six sigma. Back to Duty

K13: Data acquisition and troubleshooting techniques for diagnosing problems, faults or establishing performance characteristics, supporting improvement opportunities and potential design modifications to systems, products or components. Back to Duty

K14: Ways to access personal and professional development and to maintain vocational currency. Back to Duty

K15: Specific organisational processes used in the research, design and development products, components or systems and how they can be utilised to optimise factors such as safety, efficiency, performance, productivity and sustainability. Back to Duty

K16: Quality management and assurance processes. Back to Duty

K17: Management of change (MOC) processes of requesting, determining viability, planning, implementing and evaluating changes to a product, system or component. Understand the importance of strict adherence to MOC, and know the limitations when providing MOC approval. Back to Duty

K18: Principles of Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) packages. Back to Duty

K19: Principles of simulation tools such as Augmented Reality (AR), Finite Element Analysis (FEA) or assembly simulation with Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools. Back to Duty

K20: Project management method(s) and principles of how to record project or programmes of work outcomes and metrics to track progress. Back to Duty

K21: How advances in technology could impact organisations in the future including factors such as the mechanical and electrical integration, digitalisation, manufacturing systems and in supporting the sustainability agenda such as Industry 4.0. Back to Duty

K22: Workload or time management techniques used to ensure that personal and team objectives are achieved. Back to Duty

K23: Different applications and limitations of computer based software system or packages used in the design and development process. Back to Duty

K24: Benefits of working collaboratively with colleagues and sharing best practice to support business quality and performance measures or issues. Back to Duty

K25: Manufacturing methods used to support the design or development process from concept to production ready products, components or systems. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Translate conceptual ideas or technical requirements into developmental outcomes or operational designs or specifications for products, systems or components to solve engineering challenges such as compliance, technology, technical or physical challenges. Back to Duty

S2: Select, use and apply approved problem-solving methods to solve complex problems and determine appropriate solutions or actions such as Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, and Control (DMAIC), Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) or Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA). Back to Duty

S3: Collate and use a range of data sources and supporting documentation to support projects. Back to Duty

S4: Interpret and produce technical documentation such as schematic and circuit diagrams, engineering drawings or 3D CAD models, simulation models, project plans, engineering reports, test reports, fault reports or data analytics using company documentation systems and guidelines. Back to Duty

S5: Observe, record and draw accurate and auditable conclusions from data or developmental or test evidence. Back to Duty

S6: Manage assigned projects or programmes of work to meet the required specification, taking into account factors such as resource requirements, safety, quality, cost and performance or sustainability criteria. Apply processes for project or programme management including outcomes such as escalation, audit or risk management and risk mitigation. Back to Duty

S7: Comply with statutory and organisational safety standards and requirements, supporting safety risk assessments and mitigate any risks identified within the design, manufacture, development or test activity. Back to Duty

S8: Identify resources, such as digital tools or technologies, human, equipment, materials or data, to complete design and development projects or programmes of work. Back to Duty

S9: Create and manage a project or work programme plan and develop activities in a logical process embedding mechanisms for adapting to changing circumstances or requirements. Back to Duty

S10: Demonstrate leadership when undertaking product design, development, modification or update engineering activities. Back to Duty

S11: Identify and rectify faults, inaccuracies, discrepancies or unexpected results during the design or development process, which may impact the quality and reliability of the product, system or component. Back to Duty

S12: Ensure that all systems or equipment has been correctly configured and checked for safe operation before use. Back to Duty

S13: Evaluate engineering designs, development or modification options. Back to Duty

S14: Identify areas for improvement and lead continuous improvement activities in the operation and performance of the product, system or component. Back to Duty

S15: Complete project documentation checks throughout the activity and report non-conformances. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Champions a healthy and safe working environment. Back to Duty

B2: Has a quality and compliance mindset. Back to Duty

B3: Uses independent judgement and takes responsibility for decisions. Back to Duty

B4: Collaborate and promote teamwork across disciplines. Back to Duty

B5: Is agile, resilient and motivated when faced with change. Back to Duty

B6: Builds relationships in a respectful, collaborative and open and honest way. Back to Duty

B7: Committed to continuous professional development. Back to Duty

B8: Committed to upholding the organisations values, ethics, goals, codes of practice, statutory requirements and standards. Back to Duty

B9: Leads by example being an advocate for change and sustainable approaches. Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

BEng Honours or BSc Honours degree accredited by an Engineering Council licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI). Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on content from the outset.

Level: 6 (integrated degree)

Professional recognition

This standard aligns with the following professional recognition:

  • IMechE for Incorporated Engineer
  • IET for Incorporated Engineer
Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.1

Introduction and overview

This document sets out the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the product design and development engineer (degree) apprenticeship standard. It explains how the EPA for this apprenticeship must operate.

It provides the EPA design requirements for end-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) for this apprenticeship standard. It will also be useful for apprentices undertaking this apprenticeship, their employers and training providers.

Product design and development engineer (degree) apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the apprenticeship providers and assessment register (APAR).

In an integrated degree apprenticeship standard, the degree incorporates on-programme learning and assessment with an EPA to test the occupational standard’s knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs). The degree required for this apprenticeship standard is a BEng Honours or BSc Honours degree accredited by an Engineering Council licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI). The BEng Honours or BSc Honours degree must be worth 360 credits, with the EPA contributing between 30-60 credits to complete both the Honours degree and the apprenticeship. Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on content from the outset.

A full-time apprentice typically spends 42 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards occupational standard. All apprentices must spend at least 12 minths on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

Before starting EPA, an apprentice must meet the gateway requirements. For this apprenticeship they are:

  • the employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard
  • apprentices must have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • the employer must have agreed the subject, title, and scope for the EPA work-based project with the EPAO
  • apprentices must have compiled and submitted a portfolio of evidence to underpin the EPA professional discussion
  • apprentices must complete and pass all credit carrying modules of the BEng Honours or BSc Honours engineering degree accredited by an Engineering Council (UK) licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI), apart from the final 30-60 credits which will form the EPA. Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on content from the outset.

The EPAO must confirm that all required gateway evidence has been provided and accepted as meeting the gateway requirements. The EPAO is responsible for confirming gateway eligibility. Once this has been confirmed, the EPA period starts. This EPA should then be completed within an EPA period lasting typically for 6 months.

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - work-based project report with presentation and questioning:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 42 months

The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must complete training towards any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard.

The qualification(s) required are:

BEng Honours or BSc Honours degree accredited by an Engineering Council licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI). Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on content from the outset.

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence.

End-point assessment gateway

The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the occupational standard as a product design and development engineer (degree)
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must have passed any other qualifications listed in the product design and development engineer (degree) occupational standard ST0027.

The qualification(s) required are:

Completed and passed all credit carrying modules of the BEng Honours or BSc Honours engineering degree accredited by an Engineering Council (UK) licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI), apart from the final module which will form the EPA. Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on the content from the outset.

For the work-based project with presentation and questioning, the project subject, title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO.

For the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 6 months

Grades available for each assessment method:

Work-based project report with presentation and questioning

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction
Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with IMechE for Incorporated Engineer

The apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

This apprenticeship aligns with IET for Incorporated Engineer

The apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 6 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice should only enter the gateway once the employer is content that the apprentice is working at or above the level of the occupational standard. In making this decision, the employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the decision must ultimately be made solely by the employer.

The EPAO determines when all other gateway requirements have been met, and the EPA period will only start once the EPAO has confirmed this.

In addition to the employer's confirmation that the apprentice is working at or above the level of the occupational standard, the apprentice must have completed the following gateway requirements prior to starting EPA:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • completed and passed all credit carrying modules of the BEng Honours or BSc Honours engineering degree accredited by an Engineering Council (UK) licensed Professional Engineering Institution (PEI), apart from the final module which will form the EPA. Employers may use a degree that intends to get accreditation - a PEI must be involved and consulted on content from the outset
  • for the work-based project report with presentation and questioning, the employer must have the subject, title and scope agreed by the EPAO.
  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

  • apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship
  • It must contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by the professional discussion
  • the portfolio of evidence will typically contain 15 discrete pieces of evidence
  • evidence must be mapped against the KSBs assessed by the professional discussion
  • evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records, policies, or procedures for example: specific records of the work undertaken by the apprentice including any relevant design related documentation, quality, compliance, fault, diagnostic and test records, simulation data, reports or documents used or produced as part of the normal work activity
  • evidence of the way the apprentice carried out the activities to meet the requirements of the standard, such as technical expert observation records
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

  • it should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment
  • any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example witness statements) rather than opinions
  • the evidence provided must be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence must contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this
  • the portfolio of evidence must be submitted to the EPAO at the gateway

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the professional discussion. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the professional discussion. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Work-based project report with presentation and questioning

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • project with a project output

  • presentation with questions and answers

Together, these components give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. They are assessed by an independent assessor.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • this is a holistic method of assessment of multiple KSBs across a range of duties carried out through a work-based project
  • the project report method has been selected as it provides the opportunity to assess a wide range of knowledge, skills, and behaviours over a time period not possible through direct observation
  • a work-based project and report allows the apprentice to demonstrate their competence by completing a typical activity undertaken by a design or development engineer and the project should have a business benefit
  • the assessment method is a cost-effective way of demonstrating competence of the relevant KSBs and replicates the typical real-world environment.

Delivery

The apprentice must complete a project based on any of the following:

  • a specific problem or recurring issue related to a product, or a research or development project, for example a continuous improvement project or product system update
  • a new project such as the design of a product (depending on size this may only cover a certain aspect of the project)
  • a feasibility study such as investigating a new piece of equipment or technology

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO must sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

The project output must be in the form of a report and presentation.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within the project period, to plan and complete their project.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project, which could include internal colleagues or technical experts. The apprentice must however, complete their project report and presentation unaided and they must be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm this when the report and any presentation materials are submitted.

Component 1: Project report

The report must include at least:

  • executive summary
  • an introduction - what is the project or activity about?
  • the scope of the project (including key performance indicators)
  • a project plan
  • project research and finding
  • evaluation of potential solutions
  • project outcomes and how these outcomes were achieved
  • recommendations and project conclusions

The project report must have a word count of 9000 words. A tolerance of 10% above or below is allowed at the apprentice’s discretion. Appendices, references and diagrams are not included in this total. The apprentice must produce and include a mapping in an appendix, showing how the report evidences the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice must complete and submit the report and any presentation materials to the EPAO by the end of week 20 of the EPA period.

Component 2: Presentation with questions

The presentation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The apprentice must prepare and deliver a presentation to an independent assessor. After the presentation, the independent assessor must ask the apprentice questions about their project, report and presentation.

The presentation should cover:

  • an overview of the project
  • the project scope (including key performance indicators)
  • summary of actions undertaken by the apprentice
  • project outcomes and how these were achieved

The presentation with questions must last 60 minutes. This will typically include a presentation of 20 minutes and questioning lasting 40 minutes. The independent assessor must use the full time available for questioning. The independent assessor can increase the time of the presentation and questioning by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete their last point or respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is:

  • to verify that the activity was completed by the apprentice
  • to seek clarification where required
  • to assess those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to demonstrate with the report, although these should be kept to a minimum
  • to assess level of competence against the grading descriptors

The apprentice must submit any presentation materials to the EPAO at the same time as the report - by the end of week 20 of the EPA period. The apprentice must notify the EPAO, at that point, of any technical requirements for the presentation.

During the presentation, the apprentice must have access to:

  • presentation software
  • videos
  • a flip chart
  • interactive demonstrations
  • notes
  • computer
  • their project report with annexes

The independent assessor must have at least 1 weeks to review the project report and any presentation materials, to allow them to prepare questions.

The apprentice must be given at least 10 days’ notice of the presentation with questions.

Assessment decision

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. They must assess the project components holistically when deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs demonstrated in the report and presentation with questions
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

Assessment location

The presentation with questions must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises. It should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The presentation with questions can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAO must produce the following materials to support the project:

  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the professional discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • it is a holistic assessment method, allowing the apprentice to demonstrate KSBs in an integrated way
  • it allows for fair assessment of apprentices employed in various contexts and or size of organisation
  • it allows the apprentice to reference experience gained as part of the on-programme journey
  • it can be used for synoptic assessment of knowledge, skills, and behaviours. This method also helps to assess the apprentice’s in-depth understanding of product design or development engineer processes and procedures that are difficult to observe and take place over a longer period of time

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the professional discussion.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is to look at the following themes

  • principles and applications
  • problem solving and improvement
  • project planning
  • values and commitment

The EPAO must give an apprentice 10 days' notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 0 weeks to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however, the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 60 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 10 questions. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises.

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Grading

Work-based project report with presentation and questioning

Theme
KSBs
Pass
APPRENTICES MUST DEMONSTRATE ALL OF THE PASS DESCRIPTORS
Distinction
APPRENTICES MUST DEMONSTRATE ALL OF THE PASS DESCRIPTORS AND ALL OF THE DISTINCTION DESCRIPTORS
Project Delivery
K10 K11 K15 K20 K22 K23 S1 S3 S4 S5 S8 S9 S13 B9

Collates, uses, and stores a range of data sources and supporting documentation, selecting effective method(s) to inform and present data and project outcomes (K10, S3) 

Interprets the project brief and produces technical documentation such as engineering drawings or models, schematic diagrams, project plans, test report’s fault reports or data analytics using company documentation systems and guidelines (S4)

Observes, records, and uses data, or developmental or test evidence, within the project to draw auditable conclusions (S5)

Evaluates engineering designs, development, or modification options to determine and recommend effective solutions taking into account factors such as quality, cost, time, resource, sustainability and environmental impact KPIs. (K15, S1, S13)

Evaluates different computer-based software systems or packages and articulates their advantages and limitations when used to deliver product design or development projects or programmes within an agreed schedule, performance, and budget (K23) 

Identifies the resources required to meet the requirements of the project brief, leading by example to advocate change and sustainable approaches with consideration for factors such as cost, quality, safety, security, and environmental impact (S8, B9)

Creates and implements a plan to satisfy the timescales outlined in the project brief. 

Develops activities in a logical process and embeds mechanisms for recording outcomes and metrics. 

Adapts to changing circumstances or requirements, for example contingency planning or risk management in the project, outlining the commercial impact on the business. (K11, K20, K22, S9)

 

Compares and contrasts the relative value of different data sources, providing a detailed rationale for the choice of data sources utilised within the project (S3)

Evaluates potential changes, alternative approaches or technologies to improve resource usage for future project outcomes within a similar project environment taking into account organisational sustainability targets or KPIs (S8)

Reviews and evaluates the original project plan against actual delivery and explains what could have been done differently and potentially improve future projects. Explains the impact future technological advancements, industry changes or commercial changes may have on the project (S9)

Compliance and quality
K1 K2 K16 K17 S15 B2

Accommodates safety, environmental, quality and security standards associated with product design or development and the environments in which they reside.

Complies with organisational and traceability requirements for product design or development documentation. Ensures any non-conformances are reported using the appropriate organisational process (K1, K2, K16, S15, B2)

Explains the management of change (MOC) processes for requesting, determining viability, planning, implementing, and evaluating changes to a product, component or system design or development programme.  Explains the importance of strict adherence to MOC, and the limitations when providing MOC approval (K17)

 

Evaluates where national or international standards may need to be reformed or amended and how this could impact on future similar projects (K1)

Leadership and management
K24 S10 B3 B4 B6

Demonstrates leadership when undertaking design or development engineering activities to meet the requirements of the project brief by making decisions and taking responsibility for their actions.

Collaborates across disciplines, building relationships and communicating in a collaborative, respectful, open, and honest way. (K24, S10, B3, B4, B6)

Analyses ways of improving collaborative working and sharing best practice and evaluate their potential impact on the project outcomes (K24, S10)

Compares and contrasts different leadership and communication approaches and evaluate their likely impact on the project delivery and outcomes providing justification for the approaches selected (S10, B6)

 

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Theme
KSBs
Pass
APPRENTICES MUST DEMONSTRATE ALL OF THE PASS DESCRIPTORS
Distinction
APPRENTICES MUST DEMONSTRATE ALL OF THE PASS DESCRIPTORS AND ALL OF THE DISTINCTION DESCRIPTORS
Principles and applications
K3 K4 K5 K6 K8 K9 K18 K19 K21 K25 S12

Articulates the types of constraints or limitations when designing, developing, testing, or modifying a product, component, or system (K3)

Articulates the principles and different applications of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics relevant to product design or development (K4)

Evaluates the different applications of mechanical dynamic systems relevant to product design or development (K5)

Articulates the principles of mathematics and scientific methods including analytical techniques required to perform the design and development engineer role such as evaluating statistical data, using complex numbers or matrices (K8)

Articulates the principles and applications of electrical, electronic systems and components and digital engineering relevant to the design or development of products, components, or systems (K9)

Articulates the operating principles of Computer Aided Design tools and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) packages (K18)

Explains the operating principles of simulation tools including their applications (K19)

Explains how advances in technology could impact organisations in the future including factors such as the integration of mechanical and electronic components or software, systems engineering and Industry 4.0 with regards to sustainability (K21)

Explains the factors to take into account when selecting materials or components and manufacturing methods to use when designing a product or system (K6, K25)

Explains how they ensure all systems, and or equipment, are configured and security tested for safe operational use in line with the manufacturers and organisations guidelines (S12)

 

Critically evaluates the benefits and limitations of Computer Aided Design tools and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) packages (K18)

Critically evaluates the benefits and limitations of using simulation tools (K19)

Critically evaluates how advances in technology could impact their own organisation in the future with reference to meeting environmental and sustainability targets (K21)

 

Problem solving and improvement
K12 K13 S2 S14

Analyses the data acquisition and troubleshooting techniques used for diagnosing problems, faults or for establishing performance characteristics.

Justifies how they select, use, and apply problem-solving methods to solve complex problems and determine appropriate solutions or actions (K13, S2)  

Explains improvement methods and techniques and how they identify areas for improvement including through interpretation of data or KPIs. How they lead improvement activities in areas such as such as safety, quality, performance, sustainability and environmental targets or cost (K12, S14)

 

Compares and contrasts different problem-solving methods and articulates how this informs their approach to problem-solving (K13, S2)

Critically evaluates the impact that the improvement activity has had on the business (K12, S14)

project planning
K7 S6 S7 S11 B1 B5

Explains the different life cycle stages of a typical product, component, or system from the concept stage through to recycling or reusability (K7) 

Articulates how they manage assigned projects to meet the required specification, including how they remain resilient and motivated when faced with changes to work requirements and how they implement escalation, audit or risk management and risk mitigation (S6, B5)

Articulates how they address faults, inaccuracies, discrepancies or unexpected results during the design or development process that may impact on the design, development or quality and reliability of the product, system, or component (S11)

Explains how they comply with statutory and organisational safety standards and requirements including supporting safety risk assessments to mitigate and manage any health and safety risks identified as part of the design, manufacture, development, or test process (S7, B1)

 

Evaluates how future technologies or sustainability KPIs may impact on the design or development life cycle stages (K7)

Evaluates the key differences between different project management methodologies and where different methodologies may be more or less effective (S6)

 

values and commitment
K14 B7 B8

Explains how they demonstrate drive and commitment for continuous professional development, explains the impact it has on their performance and the business (K14, B7)

Explains how they uphold a commitment to the business values, ethics, goals, codes of practice, statutory requirements, and standards of the organisation. Explains the impact that has on the business and customers (B8)

 

None

Overall EPA grading

All assessment methods are weighted equally in their contribution to the overall EPA grade.

Performance in the EPA will determine the apprenticeship grade of:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the: work-based project report with presentation and questioning and professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they will be awarded an overall fail. 

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. In order to achieve an overall EPA ‘merit’, apprentices must achieve a distinction in one of the assessment methods and a pass in the other assessment method. In order to achieve an overall EPA ‘distinction’, apprentices must achieve a distinction in both assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Work-based project report with presentation and questioning Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Merit
Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment method, they can re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does. 

The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 2 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 4 months of the EPA outcome notification. 

If the apprentice fails the project assessment method, they must amend the project output in line with the independent assessor’s feedback. The apprentice will be given

If the apprentice fails the project assessment method, they may amend the project and presentation in line with the independent assessor’s feedback, rather than complete a new project.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the apprenticeship standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • prepare for and undertake the EPA including meeting all gateway requirements
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO (and therefore training provider)
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the the occupational competence and is ready for EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan
  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner
  • provide access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows appropriate opportunity for the apprentice to meet the KSBs.
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete the EPA
  • ensure that any required supervision during the EPA period, as stated within this EPA plan, is in place
  • ensure the apprentice has access to the resources used to fulfil their role and carry out the EPA for workplace based assessments
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO - HEP

As a minimum, the EPAO (HEP) must:

  • conform to the requirements of the apprenticeship provider and assessment register
  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP)
  • understand the degree-apprenticeship, including the apprenticeship standard, EPA plan and funding
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material)
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence which ensures, as a minimum, no personal benefit or detriment is received by those delivering the EPA or from the result of an assessment and covers:
    • apprentices
    • employers
    • assessors
    • the HEP’s role as a training provider
    • any other roles involved in delivery or grading of the EPA
  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent assessment and maintain records of IQA activity for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • appoint independent, competent and suitably qualified assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan
  • where required to facilitate the EPA, appoint administrators, invigilators and any other roles
  • deliver induction, initial and on-going training for all assessors, and if used administrators and invigilators and any other roles involved in delivery or grading of the EPA specified within this EPA plan. This should include how to record the rationale and evidence for grading decisions where required
  • standardise all assessors, before allowing them to deliver EPAs and:
    • when the EPA is updated
    • at least once a year
    • moderate their decisions once EPAs have begun
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material)
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence which ensures, as a minimum, no personal benefit or detriment is received by those delivering the EPA or from the result of an assessment and covers:
  • monitor the performance of all assessors and provide re-training where necessary
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the degree-apprenticeship
  • arrange for the EPA to take place in a timely manner, in consultation with the employer
  • provide information, advice and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met
  • host and facilitate the EPA or make suitable alternative arrangements
  • maintain the security of the EPA including, but not limited to, verifying the identity of the apprentice, invigilation, security of materials
  • where the EPA plan permits assessment away from the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary
  • confirm the overall EPA grade
  • arrange the certification of the degree-apprenticeship
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure

Training provider - HEP

As a minimum, the training provider (HEP) must:

  • conform to the requirements of the apprenticeship provider and assessment register
  • ensure procedures are in place to mitigate against any conflict of interest
  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours as outlined in the apprenticeship standard
  • deliver training to apprentices as outlined in their learner agreement
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must:

  • be independent, with no conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider, specifically, they must not receive a personal benefit or detriment from the result of the assessment
  • not be employed by the same organisation as the apprentice or drawn from an organisation on IfATE’s directory of professional and employer-led bodies that supports external quality assurance.
  • be current and active in the occupation, for example be sourced from the industry or a professional body
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation
  • have authority to represent the professional body where the EPA is acting as the professional body’s assessment process (if necessary and permitted in the EPA plan)
  • have the competence to assess the EPA and meet the requirements of the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the degree-apprenticeship (occupational standard and EPA plan)
  • attend induction and standardisation events before they conduct an EPA for the first time, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • use language in the delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the degree-apprenticeship
  • work with other personnel, including additional assessors where used, in the preparation and delivery of assessment methods
  • conduct the EPA to assess the apprentice against the KSBs and in accordance with the EPA plan
  • make all final grading decisions on an apprentice’s occupational competence in accordance with grading descriptors in this EPA plan
  • if an assessor panel is used, the independent assessor must chair and make final grading decisions
  • record and report all assessment outcome decisions for each apprentice
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • comply with external quality assurance (EQA) requirements

External examiner

As a minimum, the external examiner must:

  • confirm the EPA has been delivered in accordance with the EPA plan
  • accept, and therefore not change, the EPA grading decisions made by the independent assessor
  • comply with the requirements of the EPA plan and IfATE policies
  • comply with the requirements, policies, and procedures of the EQA provider
  • be independent of the apprentice, and the employing organisation who are involved in delivering the degree-apprenticeship
  • be independent of the delivery and awarding of the EPA
  • not have been involved in the teaching or on-programme assessment of the apprentice

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to the strategies, policies, and procedures that EPAOs must have in place to ensure valid, consistent and reliable end-point assessment decisions. EPAOs for this EPA must adhere to all requirements within the Roles and Responsibilities section and

  • have effective and rigorous quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable, and consistent assessment across employers, places, times, and independent assessors
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 6 gained in the last 3 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
    • have professional body membership with:
      • will typically have professional recognition at incorporated engineer level or above by a professional body recognised by the engineering council
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decision
  • where appropriate provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of assessment decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider.

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following practice:

  • potential to use the employer's premises and resources for the presentation and the questioning and the professional discussion
  • the option to use technology such as video conferencing
  • a work-based project contributing to workplace productivity

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with:

IMechE for Incorporated Engineer

IET for Incorporated Engineer

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Safety, environmental, sustainability and security standards associated with product, component or system design, development or modifications and the environments in which they reside.

Back to Grading
Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K2

Hazardous environments and safe systems of work including the impact on the design specification, product, component, system development or modification.

Back to Grading
Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K3

Constraints or limitations when designing, developing, testing or modifying a product, component or system.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K4

Principles and applications of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics relevant to product design or development.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K5

Principles and applications of mechanical dynamic systems relevant to product design or development.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K6

Factors that determine material selection relevant to the appropriate industry sector and product, component or system being designed or developed.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K7

Product design and development life cycle stages.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K8

Principles of mathematics and scientific methods including analytical techniques required to perform the product design or development engineer role such as evaluating statistical data, complex numbers and matrices.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K9

Principles and applications of electrical, electronic systems and components and digital engineering relevant to product design or development such as analogue to digital conversion, semiconductor devices and circuits, sensors and electric motors.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K10

Formats for collecting, presenting and storing data including how to select the best method for conveying complex information, and how to analyse the benefits and risks of each methodology.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K11

Commercial nature of projects and how any changes or delays impact on the business.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K12

Methods or techniques used for improving or enhancing the safety, reliability, quality, performance and sustainability of products, systems or components such as lean or six sigma.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K13

Data acquisition and troubleshooting techniques for diagnosing problems, faults or establishing performance characteristics, supporting improvement opportunities and potential design modifications to systems, products or components.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K14

Ways to access personal and professional development and to maintain vocational currency.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K15

Specific organisational processes used in the research, design and development products, components or systems and how they can be utilised to optimise factors such as safety, efficiency, performance, productivity and sustainability.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K16

Quality management and assurance processes.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K17

Management of change (MOC) processes of requesting, determining viability, planning, implementing and evaluating changes to a product, system or component. Understand the importance of strict adherence to MOC, and know the limitations when providing MOC approval.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K18

Principles of Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) packages.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19

Principles of simulation tools such as Augmented Reality (AR), Finite Element Analysis (FEA) or assembly simulation with Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K20

Project management method(s) and principles of how to record project or programmes of work outcomes and metrics to track progress.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K21

How advances in technology could impact organisations in the future including factors such as the mechanical and electrical integration, digitalisation, manufacturing systems and in supporting the sustainability agenda such as Industry 4.0.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K22

Workload or time management techniques used to ensure that personal and team objectives are achieved.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K23

Different applications and limitations of computer based software system or packages used in the design and development process.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K24

Benefits of working collaboratively with colleagues and sharing best practice to support business quality and performance measures or issues.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
K25

Manufacturing methods used to support the design or development process from concept to production ready products, components or systems.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Translate conceptual ideas or technical requirements into developmental outcomes or operational designs or specifications for products, systems or components to solve engineering challenges such as compliance, technology, technical or physical challenges.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S2

Select, use and apply approved problem-solving methods to solve complex problems and determine appropriate solutions or actions such as Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, and Control (DMAIC), Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) or Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA).

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S3

Collate and use a range of data sources and supporting documentation to support projects.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S4

Interpret and produce technical documentation such as schematic and circuit diagrams, engineering drawings or 3D CAD models, simulation models, project plans, engineering reports, test reports, fault reports or data analytics using company documentation systems and guidelines.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S5

Observe, record and draw accurate and auditable conclusions from data or developmental or test evidence.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S6

Manage assigned projects or programmes of work to meet the required specification, taking into account factors such as resource requirements, safety, quality, cost and performance or sustainability criteria. Apply processes for project or programme management including outcomes such as escalation, audit or risk management and risk mitigation.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S7

Comply with statutory and organisational safety standards and requirements, supporting safety risk assessments and mitigate any risks identified within the design, manufacture, development or test activity.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S8

Identify resources, such as digital tools or technologies, human, equipment, materials or data, to complete design and development projects or programmes of work.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S9

Create and manage a project or work programme plan and develop activities in a logical process embedding mechanisms for adapting to changing circumstances or requirements.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S10

Demonstrate leadership when undertaking product design, development, modification or update engineering activities.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S11

Identify and rectify faults, inaccuracies, discrepancies or unexpected results during the design or development process, which may impact the quality and reliability of the product, system or component.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12

Ensure that all systems or equipment has been correctly configured and checked for safe operation before use.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S13

Evaluate engineering designs, development or modification options.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
S14

Identify areas for improvement and lead continuous improvement activities in the operation and performance of the product, system or component.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S15

Complete project documentation checks throughout the activity and report non-conformances.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Champions a healthy and safe working environment.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B2

Has a quality and compliance mindset.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
B3

Uses independent judgement and takes responsibility for decisions.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
B4

Collaborate and promote teamwork across disciplines.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
B5

Is agile, resilient and motivated when faced with change.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B6

Builds relationships in a respectful, collaborative and open and honest way.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning
B7

Committed to continuous professional development.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B8

Committed to upholding the organisations values, ethics, goals, codes of practice, statutory requirements and standards.

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Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B9

Leads by example being an advocate for change and sustainable approaches.

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Work-based project report with presentation and questioning

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Work-based project report with presentation and questioning

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Project Delivery
K10 K11 K15 K20 K22 K23
S1 S3 S4 S5 S8 S9 S13
B9

Formats for collecting, presenting and storing data including how to select the best method for conveying complex information, and how to analyse the benefits and risks of each methodology. (K10)

Commercial nature of projects and how any changes or delays impact on the business. (K11)

Specific organisational processes used in the research, design and development products, components or systems and how they can be utilised to optimise factors such as safety, efficiency, performance, productivity and sustainability. (K15)

Project management method(s) and principles of how to record project or programmes of work outcomes and metrics to track progress. (K20)

Workload or time management techniques used to ensure that personal and team objectives are achieved. (K22)

Different applications and limitations of computer based software system or packages used in the design and development process. (K23)

Translate conceptual ideas or technical requirements into developmental outcomes or operational designs or specifications for products, systems or components to solve engineering challenges such as compliance, technology, technical or physical challenges. (S1)

Collate and use a range of data sources and supporting documentation to support projects. (S3)

Interpret and produce technical documentation such as schematic and circuit diagrams, engineering drawings or 3D CAD models, simulation models, project plans, engineering reports, test reports, fault reports or data analytics using company documentation systems and guidelines. (S4)

Observe, record and draw accurate and auditable conclusions from data or developmental or test evidence. (S5)

Identify resources, such as digital tools or technologies, human, equipment, materials or data, to complete design and development projects or programmes of work. (S8)

Create and manage a project or work programme plan and develop activities in a logical process embedding mechanisms for adapting to changing circumstances or requirements. (S9)

Evaluate engineering designs, development or modification options. (S13)

Leads by example being an advocate for change and sustainable approaches. (B9)

Compliance and quality
K1 K2 K16 K17
S15
B2

Safety, environmental, sustainability and security standards associated with product, component or system design, development or modifications and the environments in which they reside. (K1)

Hazardous environments and safe systems of work including the impact on the design specification, product, component, system development or modification. (K2)

Quality management and assurance processes. (K16)

Management of change (MOC) processes of requesting, determining viability, planning, implementing and evaluating changes to a product, system or component. Understand the importance of strict adherence to MOC, and know the limitations when providing MOC approval. (K17)

Complete project documentation checks throughout the activity and report non-conformances. (S15)

Has a quality and compliance mindset. (B2)

Leadership and management
K24
S10
B3 B4 B6

Benefits of working collaboratively with colleagues and sharing best practice to support business quality and performance measures or issues. (K24)

Demonstrate leadership when undertaking product design, development, modification or update engineering activities. (S10)

Uses independent judgement and takes responsibility for decisions. (B3)

Collaborate and promote teamwork across disciplines. (B4)

Builds relationships in a respectful, collaborative and open and honest way. (B6)

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Principles and applications
K3 K4 K5 K6 K8 K9 K18 K19 K21 K25
S12

Constraints or limitations when designing, developing, testing or modifying a product, component or system. (K3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics relevant to product design or development. (K4)

Principles and applications of mechanical dynamic systems relevant to product design or development. (K5)

Factors that determine material selection relevant to the appropriate industry sector and product, component or system being designed or developed. (K6)

Principles of mathematics and scientific methods including analytical techniques required to perform the product design or development engineer role such as evaluating statistical data, complex numbers and matrices. (K8)

Principles and applications of electrical, electronic systems and components and digital engineering relevant to product design or development such as analogue to digital conversion, semiconductor devices and circuits, sensors and electric motors. (K9)

Principles of Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) packages. (K18)

Principles of simulation tools such as Augmented Reality (AR), Finite Element Analysis (FEA) or assembly simulation with Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools. (K19)

How advances in technology could impact organisations in the future including factors such as the mechanical and electrical integration, digitalisation, manufacturing systems and in supporting the sustainability agenda such as Industry 4.0. (K21)

Manufacturing methods used to support the design or development process from concept to production ready products, components or systems. (K25)

Ensure that all systems or equipment has been correctly configured and checked for safe operation before use. (S12)

None

Problem solving and improvement
K12 K13
S2 S14

Methods or techniques used for improving or enhancing the safety, reliability, quality, performance and sustainability of products, systems or components such as lean or six sigma. (K12)

Data acquisition and troubleshooting techniques for diagnosing problems, faults or establishing performance characteristics, supporting improvement opportunities and potential design modifications to systems, products or components. (K13)

Select, use and apply approved problem-solving methods to solve complex problems and determine appropriate solutions or actions such as Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, and Control (DMAIC), Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) or Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA). (S2)

Identify areas for improvement and lead continuous improvement activities in the operation and performance of the product, system or component. (S14)

None

Project planning
K7
S6 S7 S11
B1 B5

Product design and development life cycle stages. (K7)

Manage assigned projects or programmes of work to meet the required specification, taking into account factors such as resource requirements, safety, quality, cost and performance or sustainability criteria. Apply processes for project or programme management including outcomes such as escalation, audit or risk management and risk mitigation. (S6)

Comply with statutory and organisational safety standards and requirements, supporting safety risk assessments and mitigate any risks identified within the design, manufacture, development or test activity. (S7)

Identify and rectify faults, inaccuracies, discrepancies or unexpected results during the design or development process, which may impact the quality and reliability of the product, system or component. (S11)

Champions a healthy and safe working environment. (B1)

Is agile, resilient and motivated when faced with change. (B5)

Values and commitment
K14

B7 B8

Ways to access personal and professional development and to maintain vocational currency. (K14)

None

Committed to continuous professional development. (B7)

Committed to upholding the organisations values, ethics, goals, codes of practice, statutory requirements and standards. (B8)

Employers involved in creating the standard: Jaguar Land Rover, Nissan, BMW, Siemens, Perkins, Rolls Royce, JCB, Ford, Lander, Toyota

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 Occupational standard, end-point assessment plan and funding band revised but remained the same. 04/04/2024 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 12/11/2014 03/04/2024 Not set

Crown copyright © 2024. You may re-use this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. Visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence

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