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This apprenticeship has been retired

Key information

  1. Status: Retired
  2. Reference: ST1325
  3. Version: 1.0
  4. Level: 4
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 18 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Maximum funding: £10000
  8. Route: Creative and design
  9. Date updated: 13/05/2024
  10. Lars code: 712
  11. EQA provider: Ofqual
  12. Review:

    This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

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Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Create high quality, performant visuals within budgets.

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in the British and International visual effects (VFX) industries, providing digital content for film, television, advertising, and corporate and immersive reality industries. VFX companies and studios vary in size and the number of employees they have. They are found across England and the UK. The output and remit of a VFX studio is varied, and they will produce work for a range of clients across advertising, film, television, and immersive reality. Some studios specialise in one area, particularly feature films which is the largest area of the industry. 

VFX is the term used to describe any imagery created, altered, or enhanced for moving media. This involves the integration of live-action footage and computer-generated (CG) imagery to create images, which look realistic but would be dangerous, costly, or simply impossible to capture during live-action shooting such as explosions, car crashes or flooding of cities.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to collaborate with the team to create or manipulate VFX assets or elements to meet production requirements and perform a range of support functions to ensure the smooth running of a visual effects project. This is a core and options apprenticeship, with three options and the option taken is dependent on the VFX specialism of the employer.

Option 1 – Junior VFX Artist (2D)

Junior VFX artists (2D) are responsible for assisting the senior visual effects artists by preparing elements for use in the final VFX shot. Junior 2D artists utilise artistic knowledge in areas such as composition and colour, in addition to accepted industry standard compositing software and operating systems.

Option 2 – Assistant Technical Director (VFX)

Assistant technical directors (VFX) (ATD’s VFX) may perform a diverse series of technical support functions to ensure the smooth running of a visual effects project. ATDs utilise a variety of industry standard graphical applications, scripting languages and operating systems. They may support projects by gathering artist requirements, designing solutions and coding small-scale tools using established employer workflow requirements. They are expected to work well within a team and to be good communicators and problem solvers.

Option 3 - Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)

Junior VFX artists (CG/3D) are responsible for creating computer generated (CG) assets or elements for use in the final VFX shot. Junior VFX (CG/3D) artists utilise artistic knowledge in areas such as sculpting, cameras and storytelling, in addition to accepted industry standard CG software and operating systems.

Upon successful completion of their apprenticeship the individual could have a diverse career progression, some will eventually become supervisors in their field. A junior VFX artist (2D) will typically progress to become a compositor and may eventually become a 2D or VFX supervisor. An ATD may progress to become pipeline technical directors, software developers, riggers, technical directors or FX artists. A junior VFX artist (CG/3D) may progress to become a  matchmove artist, layout artist, modeller, lighting artist, texture artist or previz artist.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with engineers, artists, designers,team leads, other visual effects teams, their supervisor and/or the client. They will need to be aware of the activities of their occupation which contribute to their “professional carbon footprint” and steps to reduce this. This is a junior level role, and the line management and reporting structure of the team will vary according to the size of the employer. They must be able to take direction and feedback, to create the effects required, according to the story being created, the VFX/CG supervisor and the director's wishes. It is usually a studio-based role.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for, in all options:

  • managing their own workload with the VFX production team and/or their lead, generating the required work on time, to meet the brief of the  supervisor/client
  • working within the workflow pipeline/toolset of the company that they are working for
  • working effectively in collaboration with clients, colleagues, partners, and suppliers in the VFX industry to ensure that the VFX elements/asset seamlessly incorporated into the production
  • using innovative approaches to solve problems and ensure VFX assets are delivered in line with production requirements
  • organising their VFX outputs using appropriate storage processes and systems.

Option 1 – Junior VFX Artist (2D) specialist responsibilities:

  • creating mattes (masking areas of the live action footage) by roto-scoping (tracing around   objects in the frames) and keying (isolating areas of blue/green screen in the live action footage) to allow all elements of the scene to be layered convincingly by a compositor
  • removing erroneous objects within the live action footage, such as camera/lighting equipment and safety stunt wires and rigs
  • producing simple composites (combining live action elements and computer-generated imagery to create a shot that looks as if it was captured at the same time by a single camera).

Option 2 – Assistant Technical Director VFX (ATD) specialist responsibilities:

  • supporting and troubleshooting the pipeline and workflow tools
  • providing technical assistance to people in creative departments
  • managing data and resources.

Option 3 - Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D) specialist responsibilities:

  • using on-set data and tracking markers to track the camera motion on set to allow CG assets to be integrated seamlessly into the scene
  • creating 3D assets which could include props, environments, or characters
  • attending dailies/review sessions to gain feedback on their work and respond appropriately to that feedback.

Typical job titles include:

Assistant technical director Cg artist Cg generalist Junior 2d artist Junior 3d artist Junior compositor Junior pipeline technical director Layout artist Lighting artist Matchmove artist Previz artist Roto/prep artist Technical runner Texture artist

Duties

  • Duty 1 Assess the requirements set by the client or supervisor brief. Establish which tools and techniques best meet the required creative, narrative and technical demands of the production.
  • Duty 2 Create VFX assets/tools in line with production requirements, ensuring the output meets the requirements for the workflow process
  • Duty 3 Manage VFX assets through the workflow (pipeline) in line with production requirements for organising, storing and retrieving assets
  • Duty 4 Work autonomously and with clients or customers in the visual effects (VFX) industry, collaborating with other departments as required to ensure that the CG elements are delivered to meet agreed production requirements
  • Duty 5 Seek out, interpret and apply information about emerging practice in the visual VFX industry to improve knowledge and performance in line with organisational protocols
  • Duty 6 Work with existing VFX project organisation tools. Consider and recommend improvements to existing tools. Develop and implement new tools as required.
  • Duty 7 Recreate physical systems or manipulate computer generated geometry to create or develop a VFX asset.
  • Duty 8 Use innovative approaches to solve problems and ensure VFX assets are delivered in line with production requirements.
  • Duty 9 (Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Create mattes using roto-scoping and keying to allow all elements of the scene to be layered convincingly by a compositor
  • Duty 10 (Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Remove erroneous objects within live action footage, such as camera/lighting equipment and safety stunt wires and rigs
  • Duty 11 (Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Produce basic composites that could be for editorial purposes for test screenings of the film, or for use in the final production
  • Duty 12 (Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Apply the principles of colour space within the VFX colour pipeline
  • Duty 13 (Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Select and use appropriate technology to render VFX assets for pre-rendered or real-time productions
  • Duty 14 (Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Track cameras, markers and objects to meet production requirements
  • Duty 15 (Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Create and manipulate 3D assets in line with production requirements/ the brief. These may include models, textures, cameras, environmental elements, rigs.
  • Duty 16 (Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Evaluate VFX assets in line with feedback from multiple sources including dailies, to ensure production requirements are met and own practice continuously improves
  • Duty 17 (Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Set up and/or follow file management protocols, convert files, file and store data securely, undertake file archiving and restoration
  • Duty 18 (Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Monitor, manage, manipulate, problem solve, escalate and report on render queues and track resource usage
  • Duty 19 (Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Perform bespoke database/ library queries or searches. Identify, collect and migrate information from data sources to meet production requirements.
  • Duty 20 (Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Contribute to software design, development and scripting

Apprenticeship summary

ST1325, junior visual effects - vfx artist or assistant technical director - atd level 4

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 18 months. The EPA period is typically 3 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

When you pass the EPA, you will be awarded your apprenticeship certificate.

EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio, the project's title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO and a project summary submitted

Assessment methods


Project with a product

You will complete a project and create a product. You will be asked to complete a project. The title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO at the gateway.

You will have 2 weeks to complete the project and submit the product to the EPAO.

You need to prepare and give a presentation to an independent assessor. Your presentation slides and any supporting materials should be submitted at the same time as the project output. The presentation with questions will last at least 50 minutes. The independent assessor will ask at least 5 questions about the project and presentation.


Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

You will have a professional discussion with an independent assessor. It will last 60 minutes. They will ask you at least 10 questions. The questions will be about certain aspects of your occupation. You can use it to help answer the questions.

The EPAO will confirm where and when each assessment method will take place.

Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.


Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in the British and International visual effects (VFX) industries, providing digital content for film, television, advertising, and corporate and immersive reality industries. VFX companies and studios vary in size and the number of employees they have. They are found across England and the UK. The output and remit of a VFX studio is varied, and they will produce work for a range of clients across advertising, film, television, and immersive reality. Some studios specialise in one area, particularly feature films which is the largest area of the industry. 

VFX is the term used to describe any imagery created, altered, or enhanced for moving media. This involves the integration of live-action footage and computer-generated (CG) imagery to create images, which look realistic but would be dangerous, costly, or simply impossible to capture during live-action shooting such as explosions, car crashes or flooding of cities.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to collaborate with the team to create or manipulate VFX assets or elements to meet production requirements and perform a range of support functions to ensure the smooth running of a visual effects project. This is a core and options apprenticeship, with three options and the option taken is dependent on the VFX specialism of the employer.

Option 1 – Junior VFX Artist (2D)

Junior VFX artists (2D) are responsible for assisting the senior visual effects artists by preparing elements for use in the final VFX shot. Junior 2D artists utilise artistic knowledge in areas such as composition and colour, in addition to accepted industry standard compositing software and operating systems.

Option 2 – Assistant Technical Director (VFX)

Assistant technical directors (VFX) (ATD’s VFX) may perform a diverse series of technical support functions to ensure the smooth running of a visual effects project. ATDs utilise a variety of industry standard graphical applications, scripting languages and operating systems. They may support projects by gathering artist requirements, designing solutions and coding small-scale tools using established employer workflow requirements. They are expected to work well within a team and to be good communicators and problem solvers.

Option 3 - Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)

Junior VFX artists (CG/3D) are responsible for creating computer generated (CG) assets or elements for use in the final VFX shot. Junior VFX (CG/3D) artists utilise artistic knowledge in areas such as sculpting, cameras and storytelling, in addition to accepted industry standard CG software and operating systems.

Upon successful completion of their apprenticeship the individual could have a diverse career progression, some will eventually become supervisors in their field. A junior VFX artist (2D) will typically progress to become a compositor and may eventually become a 2D or VFX supervisor. An ATD may progress to become pipeline technical directors, software developers, riggers, technical directors or FX artists. A junior VFX artist (CG/3D) may progress to become a  matchmove artist, layout artist, modeller, lighting artist, texture artist or previz artist.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with engineers, artists, designers,team leads, other visual effects teams, their supervisor and/or the client. They will need to be aware of the activities of their occupation which contribute to their “professional carbon footprint” and steps to reduce this. This is a junior level role, and the line management and reporting structure of the team will vary according to the size of the employer. They must be able to take direction and feedback, to create the effects required, according to the story being created, the VFX/CG supervisor and the director's wishes. It is usually a studio-based role.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for, in all options:

  • managing their own workload with the VFX production team and/or their lead, generating the required work on time, to meet the brief of the  supervisor/client
  • working within the workflow pipeline/toolset of the company that they are working for
  • working effectively in collaboration with clients, colleagues, partners, and suppliers in the VFX industry to ensure that the VFX elements/asset seamlessly incorporated into the production
  • using innovative approaches to solve problems and ensure VFX assets are delivered in line with production requirements
  • organising their VFX outputs using appropriate storage processes and systems.

Option 1 – Junior VFX Artist (2D) specialist responsibilities:

  • creating mattes (masking areas of the live action footage) by roto-scoping (tracing around   objects in the frames) and keying (isolating areas of blue/green screen in the live action footage) to allow all elements of the scene to be layered convincingly by a compositor
  • removing erroneous objects within the live action footage, such as camera/lighting equipment and safety stunt wires and rigs
  • producing simple composites (combining live action elements and computer-generated imagery to create a shot that looks as if it was captured at the same time by a single camera).

Option 2 – Assistant Technical Director VFX (ATD) specialist responsibilities:

  • supporting and troubleshooting the pipeline and workflow tools
  • providing technical assistance to people in creative departments
  • managing data and resources.

Option 3 - Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D) specialist responsibilities:

  • using on-set data and tracking markers to track the camera motion on set to allow CG assets to be integrated seamlessly into the scene
  • creating 3D assets which could include props, environments, or characters
  • attending dailies/review sessions to gain feedback on their work and respond appropriately to that feedback.

Typical job titles include:

Assistant technical director Cg artist Cg generalist Junior 2d artist Junior 3d artist Junior compositor Junior pipeline technical director Layout artist Lighting artist Matchmove artist Previz artist Roto/prep artist Technical runner Texture artist

Core occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Assess the requirements set by the client or supervisor brief. Establish which tools and techniques best meet the required creative, narrative and technical demands of the production.

K1 K7 K19

S1 S2 S16

B2

Duty 2 Create VFX assets/tools in line with production requirements, ensuring the output meets the requirements for the workflow process

K2 K5 K9 K10 K11 K13 K15 K16 K17 K19

S2 S5 S15

B1

Duty 3 Manage VFX assets through the workflow (pipeline) in line with production requirements for organising, storing and retrieving assets

K2 K3 K5 K10 K12 K13 K19

S3 S5 S6 S12 S15

B1

Duty 4 Work autonomously and with clients or customers in the visual effects (VFX) industry, collaborating with other departments as required to ensure that the CG elements are delivered to meet agreed production requirements

K1 K5 K7 K8 K14

S6 S7 S10 S11 S13

B4 B6 B7

Duty 5 Seek out, interpret and apply information about emerging practice in the visual VFX industry to improve knowledge and performance in line with organisational protocols

K4

S8

B5

Duty 6 Work with existing VFX project organisation tools. Consider and recommend improvements to existing tools. Develop and implement new tools as required.

K4 K6 K12 K13

S2 S4 S17

B2 B3

Duty 7 Recreate physical systems or manipulate computer generated geometry to create or develop a VFX asset.

K8 K9 K10 K11 K14 K15 K17

S9 S14

Duty 8 Use innovative approaches to solve problems and ensure VFX assets are delivered in line with production requirements.

K8 K18

S7 S13 S17

B2 B3

Option duties

Junior VFX Artist (2D) duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 9 Create mattes using roto-scoping and keying to allow all elements of the scene to be layered convincingly by a compositor

K3 K15 K26 K27 K28 K29 K45

S3 S22 S23 S24 S27 S47

B1

Duty 10 Remove erroneous objects within live action footage, such as camera/lighting equipment and safety stunt wires and rigs

K24 K25

S17 S20 S21

Duty 11 Produce basic composites that could be for editorial purposes for test screenings of the film, or for use in the final production

K9 K10 K11 K15 K17 K25

S25 S26

Duty 12 Apply the principles of colour space within the VFX colour pipeline

K11 K20 K21 K22 K23

S18 S19

Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D) duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 13 Select and use appropriate technology to render VFX assets for pre-rendered or real-time productions

K4 K15 K30

S4 S28

Duty 14 Track cameras, markers and objects to meet production requirements

K11 K31 K34 K35 K36 K37

S11 S27 S29 S30 S47

B1

Duty 15 Create and manipulate 3D assets in line with production requirements/ the brief. These may include models, textures, cameras, environmental elements, rigs.

K3 K10 K11 K15 K17 K18 K29 K38 K45

S3 S9 S10 S31 S33 S34 S35

Duty 16 Evaluate VFX assets in line with feedback from multiple sources including dailies, to ensure production requirements are met and own practice continuously improves

K10 K11 K14 K15 K17

S17 S32

Assistant Technical Director (VFX) duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 17 Set up and/or follow file management protocols, convert files, file and store data securely, undertake file archiving and restoration

K3 K6 K32 K33

S3 S37

Duty 18 Monitor, manage, manipulate, problem solve, escalate and report on render queues and track resource usage

K6 K12 K13 K40 K41

S10 S39 S40 S41 S44 S46

Duty 19 Perform bespoke database/ library queries or searches. Identify, collect and migrate information from data sources to meet production requirements.

K12 K32 K39

S36 S37 S38

Duty 20 Contribute to software design, development and scripting

K8 K18 K42 K43 K44

S41 S42 S43 S45

B1

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: The value of VFX content and confidentiality to the business and its customers. Why it is important to maintain data security, and the legal and regulatory requirements which apply to VFX assets including copyright and intellectual property rights Back to Duty

K2: The in-camera creation pipeline, from pre-production, through shoot, editorial, VFX to grading Back to Duty

K3: The importance and methods of retaining the quality of the source material Back to Duty

K4: The VFX industry and the terminology, policies, standards and procedures, current tools and workflows used Back to Duty

K5: The VFX production pipeline, including shot bidding, turn-over, briefing, reviews, client reviews, deliveries and final delivery Back to Duty

K6: The importance of naming conventions, file formats and version control and the impact of not doing this correctly Back to Duty

K7: How to identify production requirements from a brief; plan your approach to the work, techniques, optimisation and schedule Back to Duty

K8: The requirements and expectations of the workflow, and of other team members who will use the assets you create Back to Duty

K9: Common artefacts in plate photography such as lens distortion, parallax and overscan Back to Duty

K10: The principles of perspective, depth of field and scale, and how this relates to a believable final image Back to Duty

K11: The principles of photographic composition, light and colour Back to Duty

K12: The principles of computer systems, IP networks and shared storage systems as applied in VFX Back to Duty

K13: How assets are managed throughout the workflow including: production storage, shared storage, nearline storage and archive, whether on premises or in the cloud Back to Duty

K14: Why it is important to evaluate progress and seek feedback on your work in VFX Back to Duty

K15: How to create assets that support the vision of the story and the purpose of the image Back to Duty

K16: How computer generated imagery (CGI) can be rendered in multiple passes in order to be adjusted more efficiently in the composite. These passes can include: colour, diffuse, specular, shadow and beauty lighting. Back to Duty

K17: Research methods, techniques and tools that can be used and where to find credible and valid sources of information, reference materials and previously created assets Back to Duty

K18: The different software and techniques that could be used; the implications of their use, how to customise these and how they can be used to solve problems. Back to Duty

K19: The rendering requirements for the production and how to optimise assets Back to Duty

K20: VFX2D: How digital images are encoded and stored, especially colour spaces and their appropriate use Back to Duty

K21: VFX2D: The differences in linear light, gamma encoded and logarithmic encoded pixel values Back to Duty

K22: VFX2D: The implications of working with high and low dynamic range images Back to Duty

K23: VFX2D: The VFX colour pipeline, from acquisition to working space, balance grades, look grades and delivery Back to Duty

K24: VFX2D: How to determine the most appropriate method for removing unwanted artefacts in live action footage Back to Duty

K25: VFX2D: Camera moves and how they impact patching or frame-by-frame painting Back to Duty

K26: VFX2D: How to determine which technique is the correct method to generate the matte and how the matte will be used in the composite Back to Duty

K27: VFX2D: Motion blur, how it affects the matte and the principals of animation to effectively replicate in the generated matte Back to Duty

K28: VFX2D: How to analyse the shot to determine the most efficient breakdown of shapes and keyframes Back to Duty

K29: VFX2D The concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate Back to Duty

K30: VFX3D: How to identify and select the different rendering techniques and tools to use, and how to save and duplicate render settings across multiple files Back to Duty

K31: VFX3D: The types of data and information you might receive from an on-set environment Back to Duty

K32: ATD: The fundamentals of data structures, structured and unstructured data, database system design, implementation and maintenance Back to Duty

K33: ATD: The quality issues that can arise with data and how to avoid and/or resolve these Back to Duty

K34: VFX3D: How to identify where your asset or shot fits within a sequence Back to Duty

K35: VFX3D: The process of following image features across a series of frames to record the position of an object in the source footage Back to Duty

K36: VFX3D: How the camera moves, the impact on the tracking process and how to select the most appropriate method to produce an accurate track Back to Duty

K37: VFX3D: The technical process of tracking and how you can improve the accuracy and efficiency of tracking the shot Back to Duty

K38: VFX3D: How to interrogate software to solve issues with and/or create: simple shot lighting, basic simulations, a model, a rig or blocked animation Back to Duty

K39: ATD: The organisation's data architecture Back to Duty

K40: ATD: Grid computing and its use within VFX render queues - at a basic level Back to Duty

K41: ATD: How to balance resource needs within the company’s physical capacity Back to Duty

K42: ATD: Principles of software development, the software design process and the importance of design before development Back to Duty

K43: ATD: How workflow diagrams, prototyping and presenting to intended users can aid in designing better solutions Back to Duty

K44: ATD: Application specific scripting languages e.g. general scripting languages such as python alongside application specific scripting Mel, vex , Hscript etc. as appropriate Back to Duty

K45: VFX3D: The concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Identify the information required, and gather the appropriate research or reference materials to carry out your work to expected creative, narrative and technical standards on each production Back to Duty

S2: Select the appropriate software and technique to meet the required standards and tasks, taking into account the needs of other departments in the production pipeline Back to Duty

S3: Use appropriate techniques to reduce degradation of the source material Back to Duty

S4: Identify render errors and fix/escalate them as appropriate Back to Duty

S5: Work in line with agreed workflows, adapting to operational and creative changes as they occur Back to Duty

S6: Operate within and adhere to agreed organisational policies, standards and procedures such as health & safety, confidentiality, security, asset storage and legal and regulatory requirements Back to Duty

S7: Manage own workload and operate both individually and as part of a wider VFX team, keeping colleagues, clients and/or other departments updated on progress and report any issues arising Back to Duty

S8: Use reliable information to keep-up-to date with the new tools, software, data and other related technology, and how they affect your work Back to Duty

S9: Interpret and correct lens distortion, parallax and overscan Back to Duty

S10: Multitask on simultaneous projects, often for different clients, deciding how to prioritise the work to ensure that all tasks are completed on schedule Back to Duty

S11: Respond positively to feedback on work, making refinements as needed Back to Duty

S12: Apply the naming conventions, file formats and version control for the work Back to Duty

S13: Deliver content in the correct format as required by the employer and clients Back to Duty

S14: Use maths to describe problems, recreate physical systems or manipulate computer generated geometry Back to Duty

S15: Move, store and organise assets created, ensuring data integrity, in order to enable their use throughout the rest of the pipeline Back to Duty

S16: Analyse and determine the most appropriate approach to carry out the work Back to Duty

S17: Trouble shoot VFX problems, taking responsibility for the course of action followed, including identifying opportunities to deliver viable solutions and sharing these outcomes. Back to Duty

S18: VFX2D: Convert between common colour spaces, selecting the appropriate colour space for the given task and combining images from multiple colour spaces Back to Duty

S19: VFX2D: Apply colour adjustments at the correct stage of the composite, using non-destructive adjustments where possible Back to Duty

S20: VFX2D: Use patching techniques to remove unwanted objects within the live action footage Back to Duty

S21: VFX2D: Use frame-by-frame painting to remove unwanted objects within the live action footage Back to Duty

S22: VFX2D: Generate mattes by roto-scoping and luminance, difference and colour keying Back to Duty

S23: VFX2D: Produce accurate roto-scope by correctly placing shapes, control points and keyframes Back to Duty

S24: VFX2D: Accurately replicate motion blur within the roto-scope generated matte Back to Duty

S25: VFX2D: Complete basic composites demonstrating keying, colour grading, re- timing and screen insertion Back to Duty

S26: VFX2D: Complete basic live action and CGI composites demonstrating set extensions and simple CGI objects integrated into live action elements Back to Duty

S27: VFX2D: Create accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements Back to Duty

S28: VFX3D: Apply render settings across multiple assets Back to Duty

S29: VFX3D: Analyse, interpret and use on-set data and information Back to Duty

S30: VFX3D: Model and manipulate geometry for scene reconstruction Back to Duty

S31: VFX3D: Select and use software to create: a model, a texture map, puppet rig or blocked animation to meet the requirements of the brief Back to Duty

S32: VFX3D: Review assets created with the relevant people, offering suggestions to assist others with the production Back to Duty

S33: VFX3D: Capture and work with photogrammetry and convert it to useable 3D geometry and cameras Back to Duty

S34: VFX3D: Optimise and rebuild assets/scenes for real time rendering Back to Duty

S35: VFX3D: Assemble, layout and maintain assets into project, sequence, or shot based environments Back to Duty

S36: ATD: Identify, collect and migrate data to/from a range of systems Back to Duty

S37: ATD: Manipulate and link different data sets as required Back to Duty

S38: ATD: Perform database queries across multiple tables to extract data for analysis Back to Duty

S39: ATD: Monitor, manipulate and report on render queues Back to Duty

S40: ATD: Monitor, track and report render resource usage Back to Duty

S41: ATD: Investigate existing solutions or frameworks Back to Duty

S42: ATD: Design and present proposed solutions and respond to feedback Back to Duty

S43: ATD: Plan and document development roadmap Back to Duty

S44: ATD: Troubleshoot individual artist input, output or archival problems Back to Duty

S45: ATD: Develop small-scale tools, using existing pipeline frameworks and libraries Back to Duty

S46: ATD: Support or troubleshoot pipeline and workflow tools Back to Duty

S47: VFX3D: Create accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Work with sustained concentration and with attention to detail; able to self-check work for quality control Back to Duty

B2: Work on own initiative, be proactive and inquisitive; but recognise your own level of authority and when it is necessary to escalate issues. Act in a professional and ethical manner, embracing equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Back to Duty

B3: Think creatively and logically to solve technical problems - contribute to a process continual improvement of workflow and technique. Use initiative and innovation to problem solve, to provide creative solutions and opportunities for the production. Back to Duty

B4: Be flexible and able to work under pressure - managing and re-organising priorities and bringing multiple tasks to completion within deadlines, communicating progress as required Back to Duty

B5: Demonstrate judgement in assessing the use of emerging practice within the constraints of a production environment. Do not willingly accept second best, and be pragmatic about balancing client expectations against the available time and budget. Back to Duty

B6: Use different communication methods and tools to suit different audiences or situations and changes in circumstances to create and maintain positive, professional, trusting and ethical working relationships with your team and the wider range of internal, external and connected stakeholders. Back to Duty

B7: Maintain commercial confidentiality and professional practice at all times, and in all settings Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.0

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the Junior visual effects - VFX artist or assistant technical director - ATD apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Junior visual effects - VFX artist or assistant technical director - ATD apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 18 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a junior visual effects - vfx artist or assistant technical director - atd. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - project with presentation and questioning:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 18 months

The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence.

End-point assessment gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the apprenticeship.

The apprentice must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to their EPAO, including any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 3 months

Grades available for each assessment method:

Project with presentation and questioning

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction
Re-sits and re-takes
  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: pass
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically 3 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically 4 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 3 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think their apprentice is working at or above the as a occupational standard. They will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentices must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.
  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio apprentices must submit: portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 15 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records, for example:
  • workplace policies and procedures
  • witness statements
  • video clips of assets created
  • for the 2D option: 2-3 examples of rotoscoping or compositing shots, to include wire removal, green screen key or a composite of live action element, matte painting or basic CG render
  • for the 3D option: 2-3 examples of a model or texture map or puppet rig or blocked animation
  • for the ATD option: 2-3 examples of code development, or a report from different datasets or render queries

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the discussion. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the discussion. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentices must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms all gateway requirements have been met. The expectation is they will do this as quickly as possible.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Project with presentation and questioning

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • project with a project output

  • presentation with questions and answers

Together, these components give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. They are assessed by an independent assessor.

Rationale

The project-based approach is the most valid method as it allows the demonstration of professional competence. Producing a product in response to a project brief reflects normal practice in the workplace.

  • This occupation involves practical tasks best assessed through observation, however, the opportunity to demonstrate the skills required may be limited in a real work context due to scheduling of projects
  • Questioning allows for the assessment of the breadth and depth of underpinning knowledge against the grading descriptors
  • It is a holistic assessment method

Delivery

The apprentice must complete a project based on any of the following:

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO must sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

The project output must be in the form of a product and presentation.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within the project period, to plan and complete their project.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project, which could include internal colleagues or technical experts. The apprentice must complete their product and presentation unaided and they must be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm this when the product and any presentation materials are submitted.

Component 1: Product

The product must include at least:

2D and 3D VFX

The completed project output will be a product - a VFX shot and breakdown (electronic asset). The apprentice will be given a brief with tracking information and a piece of live action footage without LiDAR (Light Detection and Range) or lens information.

As a minimum all VFX projects must include:

  • A completed shot or sequence of shots, typically lasting 15-20 seconds in duration.
  • A shot breakdown which explains what has been done and describes the technical and creative approach taken.

The project must map, in an appendix, how it evidences the relevant KSBs for this assessment method. When the project is submitted, the employer and the apprentice should verify the submitted work is that of the apprentice.

The presentation will focus on the project and will cover the following:

  • a summary of the product and breakdown
  • the outcomes of the project, how the product was created and met the project brief
  • the tools and processes used to create the breakdown
  • the methods used, how the on-set data and information was analysed to develop the shot and breakdown

ATD

The completed project output will be a product - the development of a small scale tool for VFX use and a development road map. The apprentice will be given a brief for a show and the VFX requirements for this.

As a minimum all VFX projects must include:

  • The tool developed from the brief
  • A report on the roll out of the tool and it’s usage

The project must map, in an appendix, how it evidences the relevant KSBs for this assessment method. When the project is submitted, the employer and the apprentice should verify the submitted work is that of the apprentice.

The presentation will focus on the project and will cover the following:

  • the scope of the project
  • how the VFX tool was created and met the brief
  • how the tool was rolled out and the feedback gained on its usability
  • justification of the approach and processes taken to create the tool

The apprentice must complete prepare and deliver the product to the EPAO by the end of week 2 of the EPA period. The apprentice must produce and include a mapping, showing how the product evidences the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Component 2: Presentation with questions

The presentation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The apprentice must prepare and deliver a presentation to an independent assessor. The independent assessor must ask the apprentice questions after the presentation about their project, product and presentation.

The presentation should cover:

  • an overview of the project
  • the project scope (including key performance indicators)
  • summary of actions undertaken by the apprentice
  • project outcomes and how these were achieved

The presentation with questions must last 50 minutes. This will typically include a presentation of 20 minutes and questioning lasting 30 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the total time by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete their last point or respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is:

  • to verify that the activity was completed by the apprentice
  • to seek clarification where required
  • to assess those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to demonstrate with the product, although these should be kept to a minimum
  • to assess level of competence against the grading descriptors

The apprentice must submit their presentation slides and any supporting materials to the EPAO at the same time as the product - by the end of week 2 of the EPA period. The apprentice must notify the EPAO, at that point, of any technical requirements for the presentation.

During the presentation, the apprentice must have access to:

  • Audio-visual presentation equipment
  • Flip chart and writing and drawing materials
  • Computer
  • any other requirements as previously notified to the EPAO

The independent assessor must have at least 1 weeks to review the product, presentation slides and any supporting materials, to allow them to prepare questions. 

The apprentice must be given at least 2 days’ notice of the presentation with questions.

Assessment decision

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. They must assess the project components holistically when deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs demonstrated in the product and presentation with questions
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

Assessment location

The presentation with questions must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises. It should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

The presentation with questions can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAO must produce the following materials to support the project:

  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio

Overview

In the professional discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because it provides a synoptic assessment of knowledge, skills and behaviours. It also helps to assess their in-depth understanding of their work and covers aspects of the occupation that are difficult to observe and take place in restricted and confidential settings. This is a consistent assessment that applies across work settings in the industry. It is reflective of industry best practice for reporting orally on projects and justifying decisions taken. It also replicates the approach taken to reviewing candidate performance used in industry.

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the professional discussion.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to authenticate evidence, experience and competence. The portfolio will be reviewed by the Independent Assessor to enable them to select appropriate questions to ask during the professional discussion.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 10 days' notice of the professional discussion.

The professional discussion must last for 60 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 10 questions. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises.

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Grading

Project with presentation and questioning

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
(Core) Planning and initiating asset creation
K7 K17 S1 S2 S16

Analyses the brief to determine the most appropriate approach to carrying out the work,  justifying the selection of software and techniques and produces a schedule/plan which optimises resources, takes into account the needs of other departments and meets technical standards.

K7 S2 S16

 

Researches and collates the necessary reference materials and information required, including existing assets, to meet creative, narrative and technical expectations.

K17 S1

 

Evaluates how they identify potential issues with specification and brief and mitigated them, the potential impact on the final product. Explains how they consider the next phase of the process and identify ways in which the handover to the next stage can be improved.

K7 S1 S2 

 

(Core) Developing and delivering assets
K9 K10 K11 K15 S9 S13 B1

Explains the principles of perspective, depth of field and scale and how these relate to a believable final image. Explains the principles of photographic composition, light and colour.

K11 K10

Creates assets that support the vision of the story and the purpose of the image, delivering in the correct format as required by the employer and clients.

K15 S13 B1

Explains how a VFX shot incorporates tracking and demonstrates interpreting and correcting lens distortion, parallax and overscan in line with production requirements.

K9 S9

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

(Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Developing and delivering assets (2D)
K21 K22 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S27

Assesses and selects the optimal method and technique to remove unwanted artefacts from live action footage, considering how the camera moves and the impact this has on patching and frame-by-frame painting.

K24 K25 S20 S21

Creates a roto-scope generated matte by correctly placing shapes, control points and keyframes, and effectively replicating motion blur. Applies the principles of animation and luminance, difference and colour keying to manipulate the matte.

K26 K27 K28 S22 S23 S24

Converts between colour spaces, selecting the appropriate colour space for the given task, combines images from multiple colour spaces, considering the implications of working with high and low dynamic range images. Applies colour adjustments at the correct stage of the composite using non-destructive adjustments where possible taking account of the differences in linear light, gamma encoded and logarithmic encoded pixel values.

K21 K22 S18 S19

Creates a VFX shot which incorporates accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements.

S27

 

 

Evaluates the impact of common colour space on the assets being developed and the output and justifies their selection.

K21 K22 S18 S19

 

 

 

(Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Developing and delivering assets (ATD)
K42 K43 K44 S42 S43 S45

Develops small-scale tools, using existing pipeline frameworks and libraries and application specific scripting languages. Applies the principles of software development and the software design process, considering the importance of design before development.

K42 K44 S45

Designs and presents proposed solutions, taking into account the use of workflow diagrams, prototyping and the planning and documenting of the development roadmap Explains how presenting to intended users can aid in designing better solutions, and how they respond to feedback.

K43 S42 S43

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identify the potential for created tools to be used across other areas of the business and communicates this potential to colleagues.

K42 K44 S45

 

 

(Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Developing and delivering assets (3D)
K35 K36 K37 K38 S29 S31 S47

 

Justifies their selection of software to solve issues with and/or create: a model, a texture map, puppet rig or blocked animation to meet the requirements of the brief

K38 S31

Tracks cameras, markers, image features and objects to meet production requirements, explaining the technical processes used, how the camera moves, how on-set data and information is analysed and used and how efficiency and accuracy can be improved.

K35 K36 K37 S29

Creates a VFX shot which incorporates accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements

S47

Evaluates the developed model, texture map, puppet rig or blocked animation and considers how these could be improved or justifies their use as is.

K38 S31

 

(Core) Storing created assets
K6 K12 K13 S12 S15

Describes how and why they apply naming conventions, file formats and version controls and the importance of these.

K6 S12

Demonstrates how they store and manage assets to meet the requirements and expectations of the workflow, explaining the principles of computer systems, IP networks and shared storage systems, including; production storage, shared storage, nearline storage and archive, whether on premises or in the cloud.

K12 K13 S15

 

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

 

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
(Core) Working in the VFX industry
K1 K2 K4 K5 K8 S5 S6 S7 S10 B4 B6 B7

Explains the value of VFX content and confidentiality to the business and its customers, why it is important to maintain data security, and the legal and regulatory requirements which apply to VFX assets such as copyright and intellectual property rights.

K1 B7

Describes the VFX industry and the terminology, current tools and workflows used.

K4

Explains the context of own role, how they adapt to operational and creative changes as they occur and how they interact with: own team, the production pipeline, the workflow process, other departments; including how they keep them updated on progress and issues arising.

K2 K5 K8 S5, S6, B4

Explains the techniques they use to successfully manage and prioritise their workload both individually and as part of a team. Explains how they demonstrate flexibility under pressure to bring multiple and simultaneous tasks to completion on schedule, including communicating progress as required.

S7 S10

Describes how they develop and maintain effective communication and positive working relationships with their team and internal, external and connected stakeholders.

B6

Evaluates the potential commercial impact upon the business if data integrity is compromised, balancing the need for data availability and data security.

K1 B7

Evaluates the impact of own work on subsequent stages of the pipeline and the importance of collaboration and interaction with other departments.

K2 K5 K8 B4 

 

(Core) Maintaining technical standards
K3 K16 K19 S3 S4 S14

Describes how they use modelling and manipulation of geometry or particles for scene reconstruction, through the development of VFX asset or shot and breakdown.

S14

Explains the rendering requirements for a production and how to optimise assets, identify render errors and fix/escalate them as appropriate

K19 S4

Explains how they ensure the quality of their work and use appropriate techniques to reduce degradation of the source material, showing evidence

K3 S3

Describes how Computer-Generated Imagery can be rendered in multiple passes including colour, diffuse, specular, shadow and beauty lighting in order to be adjusted more efficiently in the composite.

K16

 

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

(Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Maintaining technical standards (2D)
K20 K23 K29 S25 S26

Describes the VFX colour pipeline, from acquisition to working space, balance grades, look grades and delivery, how these are used, and the digital images encoded and stored.

K20 K23

Explains the concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate.

K29

Explains how they complete basic composites, live action and CGI composites which demonstrate:

·       keying,

·       colour grading,

·       re-timing,

·       screen insertion,

·       set extensions

·       simple CGI objects integrated into live action elements.

S25 S26

 

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

 

(Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Maintaining technical standards (3D)
K30 K31 K34 K45 S28 S30 S32 S33 S34 S35

 

Explains how to assemble, layout and maintain assets into project, sequence, or shot based environments.

S35

Explains how they use on-set data and information received and identified where their asset or shot fits within a sequence.

K31 K34

Explains how they capture and work with photogrammetry, and convert it to useable 3D geometry and cameras.

S30 S33

Explains how they review assets created with the relevant people, offering suggestions to assist others with the production.

S32

Explains how they apply render settings across multiple assets to meet production requirements, identifying, fixing or escalating errors, and justifies the rendering techniques and tools they use in optimising assets and saving and duplicating render settings across multiple files/assets.

K30 S28 S34

Explains the concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate.

K45

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

 

(Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Maintaining technical standards (ATD)
K32 K33 K39 K40 K41 S36 S37 S38 S39 S40

Describes the organisation's data architecture and explains the fundamentals of data structures, structured and unstructured data, database system design, implementation and maintenance.

K32 K39

Explains how they identify, collect and migrate data to/from a range of systems, and how they manipulate and link different data sets as required.

S36 S37

Describes how they execute database queries across multiple tables to extract data for analysis, the quality issues that can arise with data and how to avoid and/or resolve these.

K33 S38

Describes, with examples, how to monitor, manipulate and report on render resource usage and how they use grid computing to manage and prioritise render queues, while balancing resource needs.

K40 K41 S39 S40

 

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

 

(Core) Problem solving in VFX
K18 S17 B2 B3

Explains how they use initiative and apply innovative and logical thinking to solve technical problems and provide creative solutions that support continuous improvement.

B3

Explains when and why they would need to escalate a VFX problem and how they act on advice to achieve the required outcome, whilst acting in an ethical and professional manner.

S17 B2

Describes the different software and techniques that could be used to solve problems; the implications of their use, sustainability impact, and how to customise these.

K18

 

Provides potential solutions and/ or approaches when escalating VFX problems or render errors.

S17 B2

(Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Problem solving in VFX (ATD)
S41 S44 S46

Describes how they support or troubleshot for others with pipeline, workflow, input, output or archival problems and investigated existing solutions or frameworks.

S41 S44 S46

 

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

 

(Core) Evaluation and improvement in VFX
K14 S8 S11 B5

Explains how assets created by self or others are reviewed and refined within their organisation, and how they seek and receive feedback on their own work and offer constructive suggestions to others and the impact this has. 

K14 S11 

Evaluates the effectiveness of new research methods, techniques and tools they use to keep-up-to date with VFX and other related technology. Explains how they balance client expectations of the use of new technology and practice against the available time, budget and constraints of a production environment.

S8 B5

 

Identifies the potential for assets to be used across other areas of the business and communicates this potential to colleagues.

K14 S11

 

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the apprenticeship grade of:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the: project with presentation and questioning and professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they will be awarded an overall fail. 

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall EPA ‘merit,’ the apprentice must achieve a pass in the project with presentation and supplementary questioning and a distinction in the professional discussion underpinned by portfolio or a pass in the professional discussion underpinned by portfolio and a distinction in the project with presentation and supplementary questioning. To achieve an overall EPA ‘distinction,’ the apprentice must achieve a distinction in both assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Project with presentation and questioning Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio Overall Grading
Fail Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Merit
Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

An apprentice who fails one or more assessment method(s) can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

An apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 4 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

An apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements 
  • undertake the EPA  

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA 
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan 
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis 
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:  

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner 
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO) 
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship 
  • understand the occupational standard 
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA 
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan 
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working 
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA  
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading 
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA 
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible 
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer 
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace 
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders 
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes 
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used) 
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually) 
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy 
  • verify the identity of the apprentice  
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan 
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA 
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation 
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan 
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • attend induction training 
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship  
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan  
  • assess the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan  
  • make the grading decisions 
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner 
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures 

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must: 

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard 
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan 
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning 
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA 

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to how the EPAO ensures valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. The EPAO must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section and:

  • have effective and rigorous quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 4 gained in the last 2 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in HEI.

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

Professional body recognition is not relevant to this occupational apprenticeship.

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1: Core.

The value of VFX content and confidentiality to the business and its customers. Why it is important to maintain data security, and the legal and regulatory requirements which apply to VFX assets including copyright and intellectual property rights

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K2: Core.

The in-camera creation pipeline, from pre-production, through shoot, editorial, VFX to grading

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K3: Core.

The importance and methods of retaining the quality of the source material

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K4: Core.

The VFX industry and the terminology, policies, standards and procedures, current tools and workflows used

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K5: Core.

The VFX production pipeline, including shot bidding, turn-over, briefing, reviews, client reviews, deliveries and final delivery

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K6: Core.

The importance of naming conventions, file formats and version control and the impact of not doing this correctly

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K7: Core.

How to identify production requirements from a brief; plan your approach to the work, techniques, optimisation and schedule

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K8: Core.

The requirements and expectations of the workflow, and of other team members who will use the assets you create

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K9: Core.

Common artefacts in plate photography such as lens distortion, parallax and overscan

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K10: Core.

The principles of perspective, depth of field and scale, and how this relates to a believable final image

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K11: Core.

The principles of photographic composition, light and colour

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K12: Core.

The principles of computer systems, IP networks and shared storage systems as applied in VFX

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K13: Core.

How assets are managed throughout the workflow including: production storage, shared storage, nearline storage and archive, whether on premises or in the cloud

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K14: Core.

Why it is important to evaluate progress and seek feedback on your work in VFX

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K15: Core.

How to create assets that support the vision of the story and the purpose of the image

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K16: Core.

How computer generated imagery (CGI) can be rendered in multiple passes in order to be adjusted more efficiently in the composite. These passes can include: colour, diffuse, specular, shadow and beauty lighting.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K17: Core.

Research methods, techniques and tools that can be used and where to find credible and valid sources of information, reference materials and previously created assets

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K18: Core.

The different software and techniques that could be used; the implications of their use, how to customise these and how they can be used to solve problems.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K19: Core.

The rendering requirements for the production and how to optimise assets

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K20: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: How digital images are encoded and stored, especially colour spaces and their appropriate use

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K21: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: The differences in linear light, gamma encoded and logarithmic encoded pixel values

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K22: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: The implications of working with high and low dynamic range images

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K23: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: The VFX colour pipeline, from acquisition to working space, balance grades, look grades and delivery

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K24: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: How to determine the most appropriate method for removing unwanted artefacts in live action footage

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K25: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Camera moves and how they impact patching or frame-by-frame painting

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K26: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: How to determine which technique is the correct method to generate the matte and how the matte will be used in the composite

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K27: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Motion blur, how it affects the matte and the principals of animation to effectively replicate in the generated matte

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K28: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: How to analyse the shot to determine the most efficient breakdown of shapes and keyframes

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K29: Junior VFX Artist (2D),Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX2D The concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K30: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: How to identify and select the different rendering techniques and tools to use, and how to save and duplicate render settings across multiple files

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K31: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: The types of data and information you might receive from an on-set environment

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K32: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: The fundamentals of data structures, structured and unstructured data, database system design, implementation and maintenance

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K33: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: The quality issues that can arise with data and how to avoid and/or resolve these

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K34: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: How to identify where your asset or shot fits within a sequence

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K35: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: The process of following image features across a series of frames to record the position of an object in the source footage

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K36: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: How the camera moves, the impact on the tracking process and how to select the most appropriate method to produce an accurate track

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K37: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: The technical process of tracking and how you can improve the accuracy and efficiency of tracking the shot

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K38: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: How to interrogate software to solve issues with and/or create: simple shot lighting, basic simulations, a model, a rig or blocked animation

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K39: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: The organisation's data architecture

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K40: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Grid computing and its use within VFX render queues - at a basic level

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K41: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: How to balance resource needs within the company’s physical capacity

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
K42: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Principles of software development, the software design process and the importance of design before development

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K43: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: How workflow diagrams, prototyping and presenting to intended users can aid in designing better solutions

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K44: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Application specific scripting languages e.g. general scripting languages such as python alongside application specific scripting Mel, vex , Hscript etc. as appropriate

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
K45: Junior VFX Artist (2D),Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: The concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
Skill Assessment methods
S1: Core.

Identify the information required, and gather the appropriate research or reference materials to carry out your work to expected creative, narrative and technical standards on each production

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S2: Core.

Select the appropriate software and technique to meet the required standards and tasks, taking into account the needs of other departments in the production pipeline

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S3: Core.

Use appropriate techniques to reduce degradation of the source material

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S4: Core.

Identify render errors and fix/escalate them as appropriate

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S5: Core.

Work in line with agreed workflows, adapting to operational and creative changes as they occur

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S6: Core.

Operate within and adhere to agreed organisational policies, standards and procedures such as health & safety, confidentiality, security, asset storage and legal and regulatory requirements

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S7: Core.

Manage own workload and operate both individually and as part of a wider VFX team, keeping colleagues, clients and/or other departments updated on progress and report any issues arising

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S8: Core.

Use reliable information to keep-up-to date with the new tools, software, data and other related technology, and how they affect your work

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S9: Core.

Interpret and correct lens distortion, parallax and overscan

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S10: Core.

Multitask on simultaneous projects, often for different clients, deciding how to prioritise the work to ensure that all tasks are completed on schedule

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S11: Core.

Respond positively to feedback on work, making refinements as needed

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S12: Core.

Apply the naming conventions, file formats and version control for the work

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S13: Core.

Deliver content in the correct format as required by the employer and clients

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S14: Core.

Use maths to describe problems, recreate physical systems or manipulate computer generated geometry

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S15: Core.

Move, store and organise assets created, ensuring data integrity, in order to enable their use throughout the rest of the pipeline

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S16: Core.

Analyse and determine the most appropriate approach to carry out the work

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S17: Core.

Trouble shoot VFX problems, taking responsibility for the course of action followed, including identifying opportunities to deliver viable solutions and sharing these outcomes.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S18: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Convert between common colour spaces, selecting the appropriate colour space for the given task and combining images from multiple colour spaces

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S19: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Apply colour adjustments at the correct stage of the composite, using non-destructive adjustments where possible

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S20: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Use patching techniques to remove unwanted objects within the live action footage

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S21: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Use frame-by-frame painting to remove unwanted objects within the live action footage

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S22: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Generate mattes by roto-scoping and luminance, difference and colour keying

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S23: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Produce accurate roto-scope by correctly placing shapes, control points and keyframes

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S24: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Accurately replicate motion blur within the roto-scope generated matte

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S25: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Complete basic composites demonstrating keying, colour grading, re- timing and screen insertion

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S26: Junior VFX Artist (2D).

VFX2D: Complete basic live action and CGI composites demonstrating set extensions and simple CGI objects integrated into live action elements

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S27: Junior VFX Artist (2D),Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX2D: Create accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S28: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Apply render settings across multiple assets

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S29: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Analyse, interpret and use on-set data and information

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S30: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Model and manipulate geometry for scene reconstruction

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S31: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Select and use software to create: a model, a texture map, puppet rig or blocked animation to meet the requirements of the brief

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S32: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Review assets created with the relevant people, offering suggestions to assist others with the production

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S33: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Capture and work with photogrammetry and convert it to useable 3D geometry and cameras

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S34: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Optimise and rebuild assets/scenes for real time rendering

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S35: Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Assemble, layout and maintain assets into project, sequence, or shot based environments

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S36: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Identify, collect and migrate data to/from a range of systems

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S37: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Manipulate and link different data sets as required

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S38: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Perform database queries across multiple tables to extract data for analysis

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S39: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Monitor, manipulate and report on render queues

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S40: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Monitor, track and report render resource usage

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S41: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Investigate existing solutions or frameworks

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S42: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Design and present proposed solutions and respond to feedback

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S43: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Plan and document development roadmap

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S44: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Troubleshoot individual artist input, output or archival problems

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S45: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Develop small-scale tools, using existing pipeline frameworks and libraries

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
S46: Assistant Technical Director (VFX).

ATD: Support or troubleshoot pipeline and workflow tools

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
S47: Junior VFX Artist (2D),Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D).

VFX3D: Create accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1: Core.

Work with sustained concentration and with attention to detail; able to self-check work for quality control

Back to Grading
Project with presentation and questioning
B2: Core.

Work on own initiative, be proactive and inquisitive; but recognise your own level of authority and when it is necessary to escalate issues. Act in a professional and ethical manner, embracing equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
B3: Core.

Think creatively and logically to solve technical problems - contribute to a process continual improvement of workflow and technique. Use initiative and innovation to problem solve, to provide creative solutions and opportunities for the production.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
B4: Core.

Be flexible and able to work under pressure - managing and re-organising priorities and bringing multiple tasks to completion within deadlines, communicating progress as required

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
B5: Core.

Demonstrate judgement in assessing the use of emerging practice within the constraints of a production environment. Do not willingly accept second best, and be pragmatic about balancing client expectations against the available time and budget.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
B6: Core.

Use different communication methods and tools to suit different audiences or situations and changes in circumstances to create and maintain positive, professional, trusting and ethical working relationships with your team and the wider range of internal, external and connected stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio
B7: Core.

Maintain commercial confidentiality and professional practice at all times, and in all settings

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

project with presentation and questioning

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Planning and initiating asset creation
K7 K17
S1 S2 S16

How to identify production requirements from a brief; plan your approach to the work, techniques, optimisation and schedule (K7)

Research methods, techniques and tools that can be used and where to find credible and valid sources of information, reference materials and previously created assets (K17)

Identify the information required, and gather the appropriate research or reference materials to carry out your work to expected creative, narrative and technical standards on each production (S1)

Select the appropriate software and technique to meet the required standards and tasks, taking into account the needs of other departments in the production pipeline (S2)

Analyse and determine the most appropriate approach to carry out the work (S16)

None

(Core) Developing and delivering assets
K9 K10 K11 K15
S9 S13
B1

Common artefacts in plate photography such as lens distortion, parallax and overscan (K9)

The principles of perspective, depth of field and scale, and how this relates to a believable final image (K10)

The principles of photographic composition, light and colour (K11)

How to create assets that support the vision of the story and the purpose of the image (K15)

Interpret and correct lens distortion, parallax and overscan (S9)

Deliver content in the correct format as required by the employer and clients (S13)

Work with sustained concentration and with attention to detail; able to self-check work for quality control (B1)

(Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Developing and delivering assets (2D)
K21 K22 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28
S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S27

VFX2D: The differences in linear light, gamma encoded and logarithmic encoded pixel values (K21)

VFX2D: The implications of working with high and low dynamic range images (K22)

VFX2D: How to determine the most appropriate method for removing unwanted artefacts in live action footage (K24)

VFX2D: Camera moves and how they impact patching or frame-by-frame painting (K25)

VFX2D: How to determine which technique is the correct method to generate the matte and how the matte will be used in the composite (K26)

VFX2D: Motion blur, how it affects the matte and the principals of animation to effectively replicate in the generated matte (K27)

VFX2D: How to analyse the shot to determine the most efficient breakdown of shapes and keyframes (K28)

VFX2D: Convert between common colour spaces, selecting the appropriate colour space for the given task and combining images from multiple colour spaces (S18)

VFX2D: Apply colour adjustments at the correct stage of the composite, using non-destructive adjustments where possible (S19)

VFX2D: Use patching techniques to remove unwanted objects within the live action footage (S20)

VFX2D: Use frame-by-frame painting to remove unwanted objects within the live action footage (S21)

VFX2D: Generate mattes by roto-scoping and luminance, difference and colour keying (S22)

VFX2D: Produce accurate roto-scope by correctly placing shapes, control points and keyframes (S23)

VFX2D: Accurately replicate motion blur within the roto-scope generated matte (S24)

VFX2D: Create accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements (S27)

None

(Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Developing and delivering assets (ATD)
K42 K43 K44
S42 S43 S45

ATD: Principles of software development, the software design process and the importance of design before development (K42)

ATD: How workflow diagrams, prototyping and presenting to intended users can aid in designing better solutions (K43)

ATD: Application specific scripting languages e.g. general scripting languages such as python alongside application specific scripting Mel, vex , Hscript etc. as appropriate (K44)

ATD: Design and present proposed solutions and respond to feedback (S42)

ATD: Plan and document development roadmap (S43)

ATD: Develop small-scale tools, using existing pipeline frameworks and libraries (S45)

None

(Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Developing and delivering assets (3D)
K35 K36 K37 K38
S29 S31 S47

VFX3D: The process of following image features across a series of frames to record the position of an object in the source footage (K35)

VFX3D: How the camera moves, the impact on the tracking process and how to select the most appropriate method to produce an accurate track (K36)

VFX3D: The technical process of tracking and how you can improve the accuracy and efficiency of tracking the shot (K37)

VFX3D: How to interrogate software to solve issues with and/or create: simple shot lighting, basic simulations, a model, a rig or blocked animation (K38)

VFX3D: Analyse, interpret and use on-set data and information (S29)

VFX3D: Select and use software to create: a model, a texture map, puppet rig or blocked animation to meet the requirements of the brief (S31)

VFX3D: Create accurate point tracks and planar tracks in line with production requirements (S47)

None

(Core) Storing created assets
K6 K12 K13
S12 S15

The importance of naming conventions, file formats and version control and the impact of not doing this correctly (K6)

The principles of computer systems, IP networks and shared storage systems as applied in VFX (K12)

How assets are managed throughout the workflow including: production storage, shared storage, nearline storage and archive, whether on premises or in the cloud (K13)

Apply the naming conventions, file formats and version control for the work (S12)

Move, store and organise assets created, ensuring data integrity, in order to enable their use throughout the rest of the pipeline (S15)

None

professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Working in the VFX industry
K1 K2 K4 K5 K8
S5 S6 S7 S10
B4 B6 B7

The value of VFX content and confidentiality to the business and its customers. Why it is important to maintain data security, and the legal and regulatory requirements which apply to VFX assets including copyright and intellectual property rights (K1)

The in-camera creation pipeline, from pre-production, through shoot, editorial, VFX to grading (K2)

The VFX industry and the terminology, policies, standards and procedures, current tools and workflows used (K4)

The VFX production pipeline, including shot bidding, turn-over, briefing, reviews, client reviews, deliveries and final delivery (K5)

The requirements and expectations of the workflow, and of other team members who will use the assets you create (K8)

Work in line with agreed workflows, adapting to operational and creative changes as they occur (S5)

Operate within and adhere to agreed organisational policies, standards and procedures such as health & safety, confidentiality, security, asset storage and legal and regulatory requirements (S6)

Manage own workload and operate both individually and as part of a wider VFX team, keeping colleagues, clients and/or other departments updated on progress and report any issues arising (S7)

Multitask on simultaneous projects, often for different clients, deciding how to prioritise the work to ensure that all tasks are completed on schedule (S10)

Be flexible and able to work under pressure - managing and re-organising priorities and bringing multiple tasks to completion within deadlines, communicating progress as required (B4)

Use different communication methods and tools to suit different audiences or situations and changes in circumstances to create and maintain positive, professional, trusting and ethical working relationships with your team and the wider range of internal, external and connected stakeholders. (B6)

Maintain commercial confidentiality and professional practice at all times, and in all settings (B7)

(Core) Maintaining technical standards
K3 K16 K19
S3 S4 S14

The importance and methods of retaining the quality of the source material (K3)

How computer generated imagery (CGI) can be rendered in multiple passes in order to be adjusted more efficiently in the composite. These passes can include: colour, diffuse, specular, shadow and beauty lighting. (K16)

The rendering requirements for the production and how to optimise assets (K19)

Use appropriate techniques to reduce degradation of the source material (S3)

Identify render errors and fix/escalate them as appropriate (S4)

Use maths to describe problems, recreate physical systems or manipulate computer generated geometry (S14)

None

(Junior VFX Artist (2D)) Maintaining technical standards (2D)
K20 K23 K29
S25 S26

VFX2D: How digital images are encoded and stored, especially colour spaces and their appropriate use (K20)

VFX2D: The VFX colour pipeline, from acquisition to working space, balance grades, look grades and delivery (K23)

VFX2D The concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate (K29)

VFX2D: Complete basic composites demonstrating keying, colour grading, re- timing and screen insertion (S25)

VFX2D: Complete basic live action and CGI composites demonstrating set extensions and simple CGI objects integrated into live action elements (S26)

None

(Junior VFX Artist (CG/3D)) Maintaining technical standards (3D)
K30 K31 K34 K45
S28 S30 S32 S33 S34 S35

VFX3D: How to identify and select the different rendering techniques and tools to use, and how to save and duplicate render settings across multiple files (K30)

VFX3D: The types of data and information you might receive from an on-set environment (K31)

VFX3D: How to identify where your asset or shot fits within a sequence (K34)

VFX3D: The concept and purpose of a template or hero script as appropriate (K45)

VFX3D: Apply render settings across multiple assets (S28)

VFX3D: Model and manipulate geometry for scene reconstruction (S30)

VFX3D: Review assets created with the relevant people, offering suggestions to assist others with the production (S32)

VFX3D: Capture and work with photogrammetry and convert it to useable 3D geometry and cameras (S33)

VFX3D: Optimise and rebuild assets/scenes for real time rendering (S34)

VFX3D: Assemble, layout and maintain assets into project, sequence, or shot based environments (S35)

None

(Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Maintaining technical standards (ATD)
K32 K33 K39 K40 K41
S36 S37 S38 S39 S40

ATD: The fundamentals of data structures, structured and unstructured data, database system design, implementation and maintenance (K32)

ATD: The quality issues that can arise with data and how to avoid and/or resolve these (K33)

ATD: The organisation's data architecture (K39)

ATD: Grid computing and its use within VFX render queues - at a basic level (K40)

ATD: How to balance resource needs within the company’s physical capacity (K41)

ATD: Identify, collect and migrate data to/from a range of systems (S36)

ATD: Manipulate and link different data sets as required (S37)

ATD: Perform database queries across multiple tables to extract data for analysis (S38)

ATD: Monitor, manipulate and report on render queues (S39)

ATD: Monitor, track and report render resource usage (S40)

None

(Core) Problem solving in VFX
K18
S17
B2 B3

The different software and techniques that could be used; the implications of their use, how to customise these and how they can be used to solve problems. (K18)

Trouble shoot VFX problems, taking responsibility for the course of action followed, including identifying opportunities to deliver viable solutions and sharing these outcomes. (S17)

Work on own initiative, be proactive and inquisitive; but recognise your own level of authority and when it is necessary to escalate issues. Act in a professional and ethical manner, embracing equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace. (B2)

Think creatively and logically to solve technical problems - contribute to a process continual improvement of workflow and technique. Use initiative and innovation to problem solve, to provide creative solutions and opportunities for the production. (B3)

(Assistant Technical Director (VFX)) Problem solving in VFX (ATD)

S41 S44 S46

None

ATD: Investigate existing solutions or frameworks (S41)

ATD: Troubleshoot individual artist input, output or archival problems (S44)

ATD: Support or troubleshoot pipeline and workflow tools (S46)

None

(Core) Evaluation and improvement in VFX
K14
S8 S11
B5

Why it is important to evaluate progress and seek feedback on your work in VFX (K14)

Use reliable information to keep-up-to date with the new tools, software, data and other related technology, and how they affect your work (S8)

Respond positively to feedback on work, making refinements as needed (S11)

Demonstrate judgement in assessing the use of emerging practice within the constraints of a production environment. Do not willingly accept second best, and be pragmatic about balancing client expectations against the available time and budget. (B5)

Contact us about this apprenticeship

Employers involved in creating the standard: Screen Skills, MPC (Moving Picture Company), The Mill, ILM (Industrial Light & Magic), Brown Bag Films, PLX Talent , Framestore, Blue-Zoo Productions Ltd, Outpost VFX, Union Visual Effects, Maverick Media, DNEG, ETC (Electric Theatre Collective), NextGen Skills Academy, A Plant

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 End point assessment plan revised 13/05/2024 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 20/06/2023 12/05/2024 Not set

Crown copyright © 2024. You may re-use this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. Visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence

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