Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0491
  3. Version: 1.1
  4. Level: 3
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 24 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 6 months
  7. Maximum funding: £13000
  8. Route: Construction and the built environment
  9. Date updated: 08/01/2024
  10. Approved for delivery: 27 February 2018
  11. Lars code: 244
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual
  13. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
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Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Gathering and processing geographic data from various sources, creating 2D or 3D drawings and models for the architecture, construction and engineering industries.

Occupation summary

A career contributing to the environment in which you live.

Geospatial technicians play a critical role in all the world’s most exciting and complex construction projects, applying geospatial expertise to solve real world engineering and environmental challenges. They can work on world-class projects, building hospitals, skyscrapers, renewable energy power plants, chemical plants, infrastructure, residential buildings or boring huge underground tunnels. Surveying is also used in industries such as film, TV and theatre, computer gaming and the Metaverse.

This occupation is found in the public or private sector and employers include specialist land, air and offshore mapping companies, civil engineering contractors and consultancies, construction companies, rail operators, local authorities, central government, the military, multinational corporations, cartographic publishers, suppliers of computer-based mapping technology and utilities companies and a range of others.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to capture geospatial data by carrying out a site survey to produce accurate digital 2D or 3D drawings, 3D models and data reports. These surveys help clients to de-risk their projects by providing essential geospatial data on the features and contours of the land or a building or helping contractors by giving them utility services data to avoid services strikes, which could be costly and dangerous. Geospatial technicians exist so that our environment is full of well-built, safe and precisely measured projects. They provide support in disaster relief situations by assisting with search and rescue efforts, helping to locate utilities and provide mapping assistance for retracing where people may be trapped. Geospatial data also assists in reducing flooding caused by climate change when transformed into engineering solutions.

In their daily work geospatial technicians will travel to and from site, working in indoor and outdoor environments across a wide range of locations. They will work alongside geophysical and geotechnical consultants, environmental and ecology consultants, flood risk consultants, ground investigators, ground engineers and other land related professionals to provide multi-disciplinary and collaborative products for engineering and design.

Geospatial technicians will use a wide range of technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) plus electronic data capture tools such as Total Stations as well as cutting-edge 3D laser scanners, 360° camera systems, robotics and drones.  Site data is transformed into outputs such as 2D plans or elevation drawings and 3D digital models or augmented reality models for a variety of uses including Building Information Modelling (BIM) for Digital Twins, master planning and architectural or landscape designs.

An employee in this occupation will work with internal and external stakeholders under general direction from a supervisor. They will assist in identifying and responding to complex issues and assignments, capturing key data and interpreting specific instructions, working within quality assurance guidelines to support the development of tasks.

Being a Geospatial Survey Technician is an in-demand occupation, with pathways into global opportunities and the opportunity for travel. The geospatial profession is a fast moving and exciting digital profession that contributes to a better world.

Typical job titles include:

Digital technician Drone operator Geographical information systems (gis) analyst/remote sensing analyst Geographical information systems (gis) consultant Hydrographic surveyor Land surveyer Measured building surveyor Site engineer Underground utilities detection surveyor

Duties

  • Duty 1 Plan work in compliance with occupational health, safety and environmental requirements to ensure the health, safety and wellbeing of self and others at all times. Report in a timely manner any non-compliances to the appropriate person
  • Duty 2 Plan and prepare a Geospatial project brief from the client’s specification, employing best practice geospatial techniques
  • Duty 3 Set up, operate and adjust appropriate tools, equipment and technology to capture data on site for a variety of survey types
  • Duty 4 Receive, read and interpret survey data to produce technical drawings or digital models using survey software
  • Duty 5 Use surveying information to create client reports
  • Duty 6 Complete project documentation at the relevant stages of the survey project
  • Duty 7 Work within quality assurance guidelines to ensure survey outputs are to a particular standard
  • Duty 8 Carry out continuous professional development to maintain knowledge of current and future developments affecting the role
  • Duty 9 Develop and maintain effective working relationships with colleagues, customers, suppliers, technical support staff, and other relevant personnel, to ensure that customer and business requirements are met
  • Duty 10 Comply with ethics, regulation and legislation and sustainability within geospatial profession and the wider construction industry

Apprenticeship summary

ST0491, geospatial survey technician level 3

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 24 months. The EPA period is typically 6 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the project with questions, the project's title and scope must be agreed with the EPAO and a project summary submitted

  • for the interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated, you must submit a portfolio of evidence

  • passed any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard

For the geospatial survey technician, the qualification required is:

TQUK Level 3 Diploma in Geospatial Surveying (integrated apprenticeship) QAN: 610/3069/7

Assessment methods




Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

A career contributing to the environment in which you live.

Geospatial technicians play a critical role in all the world’s most exciting and complex construction projects, applying geospatial expertise to solve real world engineering and environmental challenges. They can work on world-class projects, building hospitals, skyscrapers, renewable energy power plants, chemical plants, infrastructure, residential buildings or boring huge underground tunnels. Surveying is also used in industries such as film, TV and theatre, computer gaming and the Metaverse.

This occupation is found in the public or private sector and employers include specialist land, air and offshore mapping companies, civil engineering contractors and consultancies, construction companies, rail operators, local authorities, central government, the military, multinational corporations, cartographic publishers, suppliers of computer-based mapping technology and utilities companies and a range of others.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to capture geospatial data by carrying out a site survey to produce accurate digital 2D or 3D drawings, 3D models and data reports. These surveys help clients to de-risk their projects by providing essential geospatial data on the features and contours of the land or a building or helping contractors by giving them utility services data to avoid services strikes, which could be costly and dangerous. Geospatial technicians exist so that our environment is full of well-built, safe and precisely measured projects. They provide support in disaster relief situations by assisting with search and rescue efforts, helping to locate utilities and provide mapping assistance for retracing where people may be trapped. Geospatial data also assists in reducing flooding caused by climate change when transformed into engineering solutions.

In their daily work geospatial technicians will travel to and from site, working in indoor and outdoor environments across a wide range of locations. They will work alongside geophysical and geotechnical consultants, environmental and ecology consultants, flood risk consultants, ground investigators, ground engineers and other land related professionals to provide multi-disciplinary and collaborative products for engineering and design.

Geospatial technicians will use a wide range of technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) plus electronic data capture tools such as Total Stations as well as cutting-edge 3D laser scanners, 360° camera systems, robotics and drones.  Site data is transformed into outputs such as 2D plans or elevation drawings and 3D digital models or augmented reality models for a variety of uses including Building Information Modelling (BIM) for Digital Twins, master planning and architectural or landscape designs.

An employee in this occupation will work with internal and external stakeholders under general direction from a supervisor. They will assist in identifying and responding to complex issues and assignments, capturing key data and interpreting specific instructions, working within quality assurance guidelines to support the development of tasks.

Being a Geospatial Survey Technician is an in-demand occupation, with pathways into global opportunities and the opportunity for travel. The geospatial profession is a fast moving and exciting digital profession that contributes to a better world.

Typical job titles include:

Digital technician Drone operator Geographical information systems (gis) analyst/remote sensing analyst Geographical information systems (gis) consultant Hydrographic surveyor Land surveyer Measured building surveyor Site engineer Underground utilities detection surveyor

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Plan work in compliance with occupational health, safety and environmental requirements to ensure the health, safety and wellbeing of self and others at all times. Report in a timely manner any non-compliances to the appropriate person

K1 K2 K6 K8 K13 K14 K16 K23 K26 K27

S1 S3 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S19 S20

B1 B2 B4 B5

Duty 2 Plan and prepare a Geospatial project brief from the client’s specification, employing best practice geospatial techniques

K5 K6 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S11 S12 S19

B1 B2

Duty 3 Set up, operate and adjust appropriate tools, equipment and technology to capture data on site for a variety of survey types

K1 K2 K4 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K24

S1 S2 S3 S4 S7 S8 S10 S11 S12 S13 S19

B1 B2 B5

Duty 4 Receive, read and interpret survey data to produce technical drawings or digital models using survey software

K5 K9 K18

S5 S6 S8 S11 S12 S14 S15 S19

B1 B2

Duty 5 Use surveying information to create client reports

K9 K18

S5 S6 S8 S14 S15 S16 S19

B1 B2

Duty 6 Complete project documentation at the relevant stages of the survey project

K18 K22 K23 K24

S6 S8 S11 S12 S14 S15 S16 S17 S19

B1 B2

Duty 7 Work within quality assurance guidelines to ensure survey outputs are to a particular standard

K7 K9 K16 K18 K19 K24 K27

S3 S4 S6 S8 S10 S11 S12 S14 S15 S16 S17 S20

B1 B2 B3 B4

Duty 8 Carry out continuous professional development to maintain knowledge of current and future developments affecting the role

K4 K7 K20 K21 K24 K25 K27

S2 S7 S18 S20

B1 B2 B3 B4

Duty 9 Develop and maintain effective working relationships with colleagues, customers, suppliers, technical support staff, and other relevant personnel, to ensure that customer and business requirements are met

K20 K21 K24 K25 K26 K27

S6 S7 S19

B1 B2 B4

Duty 10 Comply with ethics, regulation and legislation and sustainability within geospatial profession and the wider construction industry

K1 K2 K3 K4 K23 K24 K26 K27

S1 S2 S3 S18 S20

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Awareness of health and safety legislation, regulations and safe working practices relevant to surveying and the construction sector, including Health and Safety at Work Act. Awareness of permits and site inductions. Ability to identify the correct safety control equipment and how to use personal protective equipment (PPE) Back to Duty

K2: Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS), site hazards, lines of reporting and required control measures Back to Duty

K3: Industry legislation and regulations that apply to working in the geospatial profession Back to Duty

K4: Methods of interpreting and extracting relevant design information from clients' drawings and specifications: 2D and 3D drawings, PDF plans, paper plots Back to Duty

K5: Methods to locate sites and plan route Back to Duty

K6: Principles and use of surveying processing software packages Back to Duty

K7: Handling, adjustment checks, calibration and security of survey equipment on and off site Back to Duty

K8: Site visits: site reconnaissance, planning and liaison and constraints Back to Duty

K9: Principles of mapping and geographic information sciences (GIS) Back to Duty

K10: Methods of control on site: static positioning, closed traverses, networks and levelling (manual and digital) Back to Duty

K11: Principles of Geodesy, GIS, trigonometry, mathematics, error theory, photogrammetry and remote sensing Back to Duty

K12: Co-ordinate systems: projections, transformations and datums Back to Duty

K13: Traditional and modern equipment and techniques of setting engineering: measuring tapes and string, distances and bearings, total station using co-ordinates to peg out, grid lines and off set Back to Duty

K14: Methods of capturing site survey data: topographic, river sections, drainage invert surveys, volumetric calculations, as built surveys and measured building surveys Back to Duty

K15: Survey types: underground utilities, hydrographic, flood risk, settlement monitoring and rights of light surveys Back to Duty

K16: Survey equipment used to capture data: total stations, levels, laser scanners, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Back to Duty

K17: Associated survey equipment: Cat and Genny, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), drone (or unmanned aerial vehicle) and mobile mapping systems. electronic distance measurement (EDM) devices. Back to Duty

K18: Contents of geospatial survey: data, information and drawings Back to Duty

K19: Quality assurance procedures of work and drawings: importance of accuracy, precision, types of errors, outliers and standard deviation Back to Duty

K20: Verbal communication techniques: giving and receiving information and matching style to audience Back to Duty

K21: Written communication techniques: report writing, email Back to Duty

K22: Geospatial project lifecycle: recording information, client time, timesheets, meeting deadlines and completing work Back to Duty

K23: The Four Pillars of Sustainability: Environmental, Social, Human and Economic Back to Duty

K24: Principles of ethics and regulatory compliance: land ownership and boundaries, permissions to undertake geospatial survey work Back to Duty

K25: Requirements for continual personal development within the industry and the opportunities for career progression Back to Duty

K26: Signs of wellbeing and mental health within the workplace, and signposting to available support Back to Duty

K27: Inclusion, equity and diversity in the workplace Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Comply with health and safety regulations Back to Duty

S2: Plan and prepare Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS) and report any additional controls required Back to Duty

S3: Select and use personal protective equipment (PPE) Back to Duty

S4: Carry out adjustment checks on survey equipment Back to Duty

S5: Interpret information from client drawings and specifications Back to Duty

S6: Gather and interpret information from a range of sources Back to Duty

S7: Communicate with others verbally, for example colleagues and stakeholders Back to Duty

S8: Plan surveys selecting survey equipment for a project according to the client's specification Back to Duty

S9: Planning routes to existing and new sites Back to Duty

S10: Establish a survey control on site for example using total station, GNSS or levels Back to Duty

S11: Use setting engineering equipment and techniques, for example measuring tapes and string, distances and bearings, total station using co-ordinates to peg out co-ordinates, grid lines and off sets Back to Duty

S12: Use survey equipment, for example total stations, levels, laser scanners, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) using geodetic parameters Back to Duty

S13: Capture and record geospatial survey data, for example topographic, river sections, drainage invert surveys, volumetric calculations, as-built surveys and measured building surveys Back to Duty

S14: Select and use surveying processing software for processing data into either 2D or 3D drawing's or 3D models Back to Duty

S15: Produce geospatial survey reports using computer software Back to Duty

S16: Apply quality assurance procedures: site work, drawing, model or report Back to Duty

S17: Manage time and tasks to meet project deadlines Back to Duty

S18: Comply with relevant industry legislation and regulations when undertaking geospatial work Back to Duty

S19: Communicate in writing with others, for example internal and external customers, colleagues, and managers Back to Duty

S20: Comply with environmental, social, human and economic sustainability regulations and requirements, for example safe disposal of waste, re-cycling or re-use of materials, efficient use of resources, contributing to the community, volunteering within the geospatial industry Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Collaborate within teams, across disciplines and external stakeholders in a professional manner Back to Duty

B2: Respond and adapt to work demands and situations Back to Duty

B3: Committed to continued professional development (CPD) to maintain and enhance competence in own area of practice Back to Duty

B4: Support equity, diversity and inclusivity in the workplace Back to Duty

B5: Take personal responsibility for their own health and safety Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

TQUK Level 3 Diploma in Geospatial Surveying (integrated apprenticeship) QAN: 610/3069/7

Level: 3

Qualification Number: 610/3069/7

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.1

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the geospatial survey technician apprenticeship. This apprenticeship has an integrated qualification which means both the qualification and apprenticeship need to be completed, passed and awarded during the same period.

The awarding body (AB) is accountable for the integrated assessment method. The end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) must take responsibility for all other assessment methods in the EPA. EPAOs and ABs must work collaboratively to manage the delivery of the EPA.

Geospatial survey technician apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

A full-time geospatial survey technician apprentice typically spends 24 months on-programme. The apprentice must spend at least 12 months on-programme and complete the required amount of off-the-job training in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The EPA should be completed within an EPA period lasting typically 6 months.

The apprentice must complete their training and meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA. The EPA will assess occupational competence.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the apprenticeship provider and assessment register (APAR). The integrated assessment method must be delivered by the qualification's awarding body.

Occupational competence is outlined by the EPA grade descriptors. The integrated assessment method is the responsibility of the AB and must be administered by them or an independent assessor appointed by the AB. The marking of the integrated assessment method is the responsibility of the AB and whoever they have appointed to administer the integrated assessment method. The EPA outcome is determined by the EPAO. The EPAO must combine the outcomes of integrated and non-integrated assessment methods to determine the apprentice’s overall grade.

This EPA has 3 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are below.

Assessment method 1 - multiple-choice test:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - project with questions:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 3 - interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated:

  • fail
  • pass

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 24 months

The apprentice must:

  • complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) outlined in this apprenticeship’s occupational standard
  • complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • complete training towards the qualification listed in the geospatial survey technician occupational standard

The qualification required is:

TQUK Level 3 Diploma in Geospatial Surveying (integrated apprenticeship) QAN: 610/3069/7

  • compile a portfolio of evidence

End-point assessment gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice is occupationally competent.

The apprentice must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • have passed TQUK Level 3 Diploma in Geospatial Surveying (integrated apprenticeship) QAN: 610/3069/7 except module 6 which will be the integrated assessment method

For the project with questions, the apprentice must submit a project brief. To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. A brief project summary must be submitted to the EPAO. It should be no more than 500 words. This needs to show that the project will provide the opportunity for the apprentice to cover the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. It is not assessed.

For the interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated, the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

Gateway evidence must be submitted to the EPAO, along with any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 6 months

The grades available for each assessment method are below

Multiple-choice test:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Project with questions:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated:

  • fail

  • pass

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 6 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA should start as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice is occupationally competent. That is, they are deemed to be working at or above the level set out in the apprenticeship standard and ready to undertake the EPA. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider, but the employer must make the decision. The apprentice will then enter the gateway.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

They must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • have passed TQUK Level 3 Diploma in Geospatial Surveying (integrated apprenticeship) QAN: 610/3069/7 except module 6 which will be the integrated assessment method

  • submit a 500 word project brief. To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. A brief project summary must be submitted to the EPAO. It should be no more than 500 words. This needs to show that the project will provide the opportunity for the apprentice to cover the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The project brief is not assessed.

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 10 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records
  • workplace policies and procedures
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

The above is not a definitive list and other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example witness statements), rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the discussion. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the discussion. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

Gateway evidence must be submitted to the EPAO, along with any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods must be delivered in the following order:

The integrated assessment method must be delivered after non-integrated assessment methods have been attempted.

Multiple-choice test

Overview

In the multiple-choice test, the apprentice answers questions in a controlled and invigilated environment. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • it allows for the efficient testing of knowledge where there is a right or wrong answer.
  • it allows for flexibility in terms of when, where and how it is taken.

Delivery


The multiple-choice test must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The test can be computer or paper based.

The test will consist of 40 multiple-choice questions.

Multiple-choice questions must have four options, including one correct answer.

The apprentice must be given at least 14 days’ notice of the date and time of the test.

Test administration

The apprentice must have 60 minutes to complete the test.

The test is closed book which means that the apprentice cannot refer to reference books or materials whilst taking the test.

The test must be taken in the presence of an invigilator who is the responsibility of the EPAO. The EPAO must have an invigilation policy setting out how the test must be conducted. It must state the ratio of apprentices to invigilators for the setting and allow the test to take place in a secure way.

The EPAO must verify the apprentice’s identity and ensure invigilation of the apprentice for example, with 360-degree cameras and screen sharing facilities.

The EPAO is responsible for the security of the test including the arrangements for on-line testing. The EPAO must ensure that their security arrangements maintain the validity and reliability of the test.

Marking

The test must be marked by an independent assessor or marker employed by the EPAO. They must follow a marking scheme produced by the EPAO. Marking by computer is allowed where question types support this.

A correct answer gets 1 mark.

Any incorrect or missing answers get zero marks.

The EPAO is responsible for overseeing the marking of the test.

Assessment location

The apprentice must take the test in a suitably controlled and invigilated environment that is a quiet room, free from distractions and influence. The EPAO must check the venue is suitable.

The test could take place remotely if the appropriate technology and systems are in place to prevent malpractice.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.    

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.  

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the test:

  • independent assessor assessment materials, which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • test specification
    • sample test and mark schemes
    • live tests and mark schemes
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Project with questions

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship.

This assessment method has 2 components:

  • project with a project output

  • question and answer session

Together, these components give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. They are assessed by an independent assessor.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because in this occupation reports are commonly used in the workplace and this is a typical method of delivering project outcomes. The method was selected as it provides the opportunity to demonstrate a range of knowledge skills, and behaviours that are usually demonstrated in a complex project environment. Other assessment methods would be unsuitable due to the length of time the project takes to complete.

The further rationale for this assessment is:

  • it is a holistic assessment method, allowing the apprentice to demonstrate KSBs in an integrated way
  • it allows for a range of geospatial survey activities to be demonstrated
  • it provides a cost-effective assessment, It minimises independent assessor time and makes use of the apprentice’s employer’s workplace, equipment and resources, and should contribute to workplace productivity

Delivery

The apprentice must complete a project based on any of the following:

A typical geospatial survey project. Some example projects could include:

  • topographical survey
  • as-built survey
  • measured survey
  • GPS survey
  • setting out for construction
  • river survey with sections
  • volumetrics
  • cut and fill modelling
  • underground utility survey
  • measured building survey
  • floor plans elevations (internal and external)
  • street scenes or streetscapes
  • cross sections
  • roof plans
  • reflected ceiling plans

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO must sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

The project output must be in the form of a report.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources, within the project period, to plan and complete their project.

The apprentice may work as part of a team to complete the project, which could include internal colleagues or technical experts. The apprentice must however, complete their project report unaided and it must be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm this when the report is submitted.

Component 1: Project report

The report must include at least:

  • an executive summary (or abstract)
  • an introduction
  • the scope of the project (including key performance indicators, aims and objectives)
  • a project plan
  • research outcomes
  • data analysis outcomes
  • project outcomes
  • discussion of findings
  • recommendations and conclusions
  • references
  • appendix containing mapping of KSBs to the report.

The report must also include:

  • the objective of the project
  • the role the apprentice played and their contribution made to the project
  • the technical skills used
  • the practical application of knowledge, skills and behaviours
  • the overall outcome of the project
  • challenges and lessons learnt by the apprentice
  • verification by the apprentice’s employer that the project is a true reflection of the apprentice’s involvement and the report is their own work.

The project report must have a word count of 3000 words. A tolerance of 10% above or below is allowed at the apprentice’s discretion. Appendices, references and diagrams are not included in this total. The apprentice must produce and include a mapping in an appendix, showing how the report evidences the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice must complete and submit the report to the EPAO by the end of week 12 of the EPA period.

Component 2: Question and answer session

The question and answer session must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The apprentice must be questioned about their project and report.

The question and answer session must last for 40 minutes. The independent assessor must use the full time available for questioning and they can increase the total time by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. They must use the questions from their EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is:

  • to verify that the activity was completed by the apprentice
  • to seek clarification where required
  • to assess those KSBs that the apprentice did not have the opportunity to demonstrate with the report, although these should be kept to a minimum
  • to assess level of competence against the grading descriptors

The independent assessor must have at least 2 weeks to review the project report before the question and answer session, to allow them to prepare questions.

The apprentice must be given at least 7 days’ notice of the question and answer session.

Assessment decision

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. They must assess the project components holistically when deciding the grade.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs demonstrated in the report and question and answer session
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

Assessment location

The question and answer session must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises. It should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAO must produce the following materials to support the project:

  • independent assessor EPA materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated

Overview

This is an integrated assessment method. The integrated assessment method forms part of the apprenticeship's EPA as well as the awarding of the qualification. The integrated qualification is the TQUK Level 3 Diploma in Geospatial Surveying (integrated apprenticeship) QAN: 610/3069/7.

In the interview,  an independent assessor asks the apprentice questions. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • it assesses the KSBs holistically and objectively
  • it allows for the assessment of KSBs that do not occur on a predictable or regular basis
  • it allows for assessment of responses where there are a range of potential answers
  • it can be conducted remotely, potentially reducing cost
  • It reduces the assessment burden on the apprentice

Delivery

The delivery of the interview must align with the conditions set out by the AB for the integrated qualification.

The apprentice must be given 14 days' notice of the interview.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the interview.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the interview. The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with examples from their portfolio.

The independent assessor must use the questions from the AB’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the AB’s training. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

To ensure marking judgements are fair and accurate, and uphold the principles of the EPA, the marking of all integrated or parts of the integrated assessments, must be marked or graded by someone independent. This means that they must be marked by the awarding organisation, an independent person appointed by the awarding organisation, an independent assessor sourced from the EPAO or a combination of the above.

Assessment location

The interview must take place in a suitable venue selected by the AB for example, the AB’s, training provider’s or employer’s premises.

The interview should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The AB must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers or subject matter experts for this occupation. The AB should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The AB must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The AB must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The AB must produce the following materials to support the interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank

The AB must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Grading

Project with questions

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Planning and site surveys
K4 K5 K8 S5 S6 S8 S9 B1

Interprets the project brief drawings and specifications and extracts the data required to undertake the geospatial survey. (K4, S5)

Plans a geospatial survey considering information gathered and interpreted from a range of sources, including site visits and the results of reconnaissance, to determine planning and liaison constraints. (K8, S6)

Plans a geospatial survey selecting equipment according to the clients' drawings and specifications, collaborating with relevant teams and external stakeholders, adhering to organisational and professional standards. (S8, B1)

Selects and applies methods to locate and plan the route to the site in line with the project brief. (K5, S9)

Explains the significance of interpreting the clients' drawings and specifications. (K4, S5)

Justifies their choice of methods used to locate and plan routes to survey locations. (K5, S9)

Undertake site surveys
K10 K12 K14 K16 S10 S12 S13 B2

Applies static positioning, closed traverse, networks or levelling to establish control on the geospatial survey projects. (K10, S10)

Uses survey equipment and co-ordinates systems to capture and record accurate geospatial survey data in line with the task requirements, adapting to meet changing work demands as required. (K12, K14, K16, S12, S13, B2)

Justifies their chosen method of control used on site and how it supported the capturing of survey data. (K10, K14, S10, S13)

Producing reports
K6 K18 K21 S14 S15 S19

Uses survey processing software to produce 2D or 3D drawing's or 3D models to meet the project brief. (K6, S14)

Produces a report which includes data, information and drawings from the geospatial survey project using computer software in line with organisational requirements. (K18, S15)

Communicates their geospatial survey report to others in writing and by email in line with the needs of the audience. (K21, S19)

Explains how they have used the drawing software to provide the information in a way that is suitable for the audience. (K6, S14)

Quality assurance
K3 K19 S16 S18

Applies quality assurance procedures to the data collected on site and during the production of the report with drawing or models in line with organisational requirements. (K19, S16)

Complies with industry legislation and regulation whilst undertaking the geospatial survey project. (K3, S18)

Applies additional quality assurance checks to minimise errors and ensure high quality outcomes are achieved. (K19, S16)

Time Management
K22 S17

Manages their own time and geospatial survey tasks, including recording information and timesheets, to meet project deadlines. (K22, S17)

Evaluates the impact managing time and tasks have on meeting project deadlines. (K22, S17)

Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated

Theme
KSBs
Pass
A pass for this assessment method will be achieved as detailed below.
Interview underpinned by portfolio
K2 K7 K13 K20 K23 K25 K26 K27 S1 S2 S3 S4 S7 S11 S20 B3 B4 B5

The apprentice will be assessed in line with the marking scheme produced by the AB. In order to pass, the apprentice must achieve the requirements of the pass criteria of the mandated qualification.

 

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the overall grade of:

  • fail

  • pass

  • merit

  • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the project with questions and the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they will be awarded an overall fail.

ABs should make clear in their marking scheme integrated assessment method what represents a pass grade for the EPA. This pass grade must reflect demonstration of occupational competence in the KSBs.

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall merit, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in the project with questions and a pass in the other two assessment methods. To achieve an overall distinction, the apprentice must gain a distinction in the multiple choice test and project with questions and a pass in the interview.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Multiple-choice test Project with questions Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated Overall Grading
Any grade Any grade Fail Fail
Any grade Fail Pass Fail
Fail Any grade Pass Fail
Pass Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Pass Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does. 

The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and the EPAO should agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 6 months of the EPA outcome notification.

If the apprentice fails the project assessment method, they must amend the project output in line with the independent assessor’s feedback. The apprentice will be given 4 weeks to rework and submit the amended report.

Non-integrated assessment methods must be attempted before the integrated assessment method is attempted. The re-sit or re-take opportunities for the integrated assessment method must fall within the typical EPA period timeframes. This is to ensure that apprentices are not disadvantaged by the assessment of qualifications being available within an assessment window occurring once a year.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • apply for any reasonable adjustments and special considerations
  • prepare for and undertake the EPA including meeting all gateway requirements
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider
  • ensure that the apprentice is enrolled on mandated qualifications in line with the occupational standard
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time in line with EPA requirements
  • ensure that the integrated assessment method is scheduled with the AB for a date and time in line with EPA requirements
  • provide access to any employer-specific documentation as required for example, company policies
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete the EPA
  • ensure that any required supervision during the EPA period, as stated within this EPA plan, is in place
  • ensure the apprentice has access to the resources used to fulfil their role and carry out the EPA for workplace based assessments
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the APAR
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP)
  • understand the apprenticeship including the occupational standard, EPA plan and funding
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • have third party arrangements in place with the AB to:
    • work collaboratively to manage the delivery of the EPA
    • ensure the EPA is arranged to meet the scheduling requirements set out in the EPA plan
    • to share the outcomes of the assessment methods in a timely manner
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material) for the non-integrated assessment methods
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence. This must ensure, as a minimum, there is no personal benefit or detriment for those delivering the EPA or from the result of an assessment. It must cover:
    • apprentices
    • employers
    • independent assessors
    • any other roles involved in delivery or grading of the EPA
  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent assessment and maintain records of internal quality assurance (IQA) activity for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • appoint independent, competent, and suitably qualified assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan
  • appoint administrators, invigilators and any other roles where required to facilitate the EPA
  • deliver induction, initial and on-going training for all their independent assessors and any other roles involved in the delivery or grading of the non-integrated assessment methods of the EPA as specified within this EPA plan. This should include how to record the rationale and evidence for grading decisions where required
  • conduct standardisation with all their independent assessors before allowing them to deliver an EPA, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • maintain and apply a policy for reasonable adjustment and special considerations for apprentices
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • provide information, advice, and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • confirm the gateway requirements have been met before they start the EPA for an apprentice
  • host and facilitate the EPA or make suitable alternative arrangements
  • maintain the security of the EPA including, but not limited to, verifying the identity of the apprentice, invigilation and security of materials
  • arrange for the non-integrated assessment methods of the EPA to take place in a timely manner, in consultation with the employer
  • deliver the non-integrated assessment methods in line with this EPA plan
  • where the EPA plan permits assessment away from the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary
  • confirm the overall grade awarded including the outcomes of the integrated and non-integrated assessment methods in line with this EPA plan
  • conduct moderation of all their independent assessors’ decisions once EPAs have started
  • monitor the performance of all their independent assessors and provide re-training where necessary
  • maintain and apply a policy for conducting appeals
  • arrange the certification of the apprenticeship

Awarding body

As a minimum, the awarding body must:

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of any regulators for the mandated qualification
  • understand the apprenticeship including the occupational standard, EPA plan and funding
  • confirm that they agree to the conditions of integration for the integrated assessment method, as outlined in the EPA plan
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements
  • have third party arrangements in place with the EPAO to:
    • work collaboratively to manage the delivery of the EPA
    • ensure the EPA is arranged to meet the scheduling requirements requirements set out in this EPA plan
    • to share the outcomes of the integrated assessment method in a timely manner
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material) for the integrated assessment method
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence relating to the EPA of an apprentice (including by way of moderation).
  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent assessment and maintain records of internal quality assurance (IQA) activity
  • source a suitably qualified and independent person who must administer all aspects of the integrated assessment method. This means that they must not:
    • be connected to the apprentice
    • have been involved in the management or training of the apprentice
    • have a vested interest in the outcome

Where this is not possible, by exception, a person who has delivered the assessed content may administer the assessment. This is providing they are not the sole administrator.

  • source a suitably qualified and independent person who must grade all aspects of the integrated assessment method. The person making the grading judgement must not be employed by:
    • the same organisation as the apprentice
    • the apprentice's training provider
  • This means that the integrated assessment method be marked by either:
    • the awarding body
    • the independent person appointed by the awarding body, or an independent assessor sources by, or from, the EPAO
    • or a combination of both

In rare circumstances, training provider staff may mark the integrated assessment method. This will only be to mark tests where there is a right or wrong answer, for example, multiple-choice tests. Strict arrangements must be in place for monitoring, moderation and quality assurance.

  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material) for the integrated assessment methods
  • deliver induction, initial and on-going training for all their independent assessors and any other roles involved in the administration or grading of the integrated assessment method of the EPA as specified within this EPA plan. This should include how to record the rationale and evidence for grading decisions where required
  • provide information, advice, and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the integrated assessment method
  • arrange for the integrated assessment methods of the EPA to take place in a timely manner, in consultation with the employer
  • maintain the security of the integrated assessment method including, but not limited to, verifying the identity of the apprentice, invigilation and security of materials
  • must externally set and externally mark the integrated assessment method
  • maintain and apply a policy for reasonable adjustment and special considerations for apprentices
  • deliver the integrated assessment method in line with this EPA plan
  • conduct moderation of all their independent assessors’ decisions for integrated assessment methods
  • monitor the performance of all their independent assessors and provide re-training where necessary
  • an auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • maintain and apply a policy for conducting appeals
  • continue to follow the rules and regulations applicable to the qualification, for example, those of Ofqual and industry regulators.
  • must give IfATE at least 6 months’ notice of any changes to mandated qualifications

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must:

  • be independent, with no conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider, specifically, they must not receive a personal benefit or detriment from the result of the assessment
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation
  • have the competence to assess the EPA and meet the requirements of the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the apprenticeship’s occupational standard and EPA plan
  • attend induction and standardisation events before they conduct an EPA for the first time, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • use language in the delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • work with other personnel, including additional assessors where used, in the preparation and delivery of assessment methods
  • conduct the EPA to assess the apprentice against the KSBs and in line with the EPA plan
  • make final grading decisions in line with this EPA plan
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • comply with external quality assurance (EQA) requirements

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must:

  • conform to the requirements of the apprenticeship provider and assessment register (APAR)
  • ensure procedures are in place to mitigate against any conflict of interest
  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard
  • deliver training to the apprentice as outlined in their apprenticeship agreement
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • not make any adaptations to aspects of the integrated assessment method
  • remain independent from the delivery of the non-integrated assessment methods in EPA
  • remain independent from the integrated assessment method, except with the marking of tests where there is a right or wrong answer for example multiple-choice tests
  • remain independent from the administration of the integrated assessment method. This person must also be independent of the apprentice. Where this is not possible, by exception and agreed by the awarding body, a person who has delivered the assessed content may administer the assessment. This is providing they are not the sole administrator.

Marker

As a minimum, the marker must:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider, except for integrated assessment methods as outlined in the training provider roles
  • mark test answers in line with the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures

Invigilator

As a minimum, the invigilator must:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO
  • not invigilate an assessment, solely, if they have delivered the assessed content to the apprentice
  • invigilate and supervise the apprentice during tests and in breaks during assessment methods to prevent malpractice in line with the EPAO’s invigilation procedures

Reasonable adjustments

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO and AB must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for a reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made
  • Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Special considerations

The EPAO and AB must have special consideration arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for a special consideration
  • what special considerations will be given

Special considerations must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to the strategies, policies and procedures that an EPAO and AB must have in place to ensure valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions.

EPAOs and ABs for this EPA must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities table.

They must also appoint independent assessors who:

  • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 3 gained in the last 3 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • assessing multiple apprentices simultaneously where the assessment method permits this

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship is not aligned to professional recognition.

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Awareness of health and safety legislation, regulations and safe working practices relevant to surveying and the construction sector, including Health and Safety at Work Act. Awareness of permits and site inductions. Ability to identify the correct safety control equipment and how to use personal protective equipment (PPE)

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K2

Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS), site hazards, lines of reporting and required control measures

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K3

Industry legislation and regulations that apply to working in the geospatial profession

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K4

Methods of interpreting and extracting relevant design information from clients' drawings and specifications: 2D and 3D drawings, PDF plans, paper plots

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K5

Methods to locate sites and plan route

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K6

Principles and use of surveying processing software packages

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K7

Handling, adjustment checks, calibration and security of survey equipment on and off site

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K8

Site visits: site reconnaissance, planning and liaison and constraints

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K9

Principles of mapping and geographic information sciences (GIS)

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K10

Methods of control on site: static positioning, closed traverses, networks and levelling (manual and digital)

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K11

Principles of Geodesy, GIS, trigonometry, mathematics, error theory, photogrammetry and remote sensing

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K12

Co-ordinate systems: projections, transformations and datums

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K13

Traditional and modern equipment and techniques of setting engineering: measuring tapes and string, distances and bearings, total station using co-ordinates to peg out, grid lines and off set

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K14

Methods of capturing site survey data: topographic, river sections, drainage invert surveys, volumetric calculations, as built surveys and measured building surveys

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K15

Survey types: underground utilities, hydrographic, flood risk, settlement monitoring and rights of light surveys

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K16

Survey equipment used to capture data: total stations, levels, laser scanners, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K17

Associated survey equipment: Cat and Genny, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), drone (or unmanned aerial vehicle) and mobile mapping systems. electronic distance measurement (EDM) devices.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K18

Contents of geospatial survey: data, information and drawings

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K19

Quality assurance procedures of work and drawings: importance of accuracy, precision, types of errors, outliers and standard deviation

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K20

Verbal communication techniques: giving and receiving information and matching style to audience

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K21

Written communication techniques: report writing, email

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K22

Geospatial project lifecycle: recording information, client time, timesheets, meeting deadlines and completing work

Back to Grading
Project with questions
K23

The Four Pillars of Sustainability: Environmental, Social, Human and Economic

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K24

Principles of ethics and regulatory compliance: land ownership and boundaries, permissions to undertake geospatial survey work

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K25

Requirements for continual personal development within the industry and the opportunities for career progression

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K26

Signs of wellbeing and mental health within the workplace, and signposting to available support

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
K27

Inclusion, equity and diversity in the workplace

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Comply with health and safety regulations

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
S2

Plan and prepare Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS) and report any additional controls required

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
S3

Select and use personal protective equipment (PPE)

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
S4

Carry out adjustment checks on survey equipment

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
S5

Interpret information from client drawings and specifications

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S6

Gather and interpret information from a range of sources

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S7

Communicate with others verbally, for example colleagues and stakeholders

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
S8

Plan surveys selecting survey equipment for a project according to the client's specification

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S9

Planning routes to existing and new sites

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S10

Establish a survey control on site for example using total station, GNSS or levels

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S11

Use setting engineering equipment and techniques, for example measuring tapes and string, distances and bearings, total station using co-ordinates to peg out co-ordinates, grid lines and off sets

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
S12

Use survey equipment, for example total stations, levels, laser scanners, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) using geodetic parameters

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S13

Capture and record geospatial survey data, for example topographic, river sections, drainage invert surveys, volumetric calculations, as-built surveys and measured building surveys

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S14

Select and use surveying processing software for processing data into either 2D or 3D drawing's or 3D models

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S15

Produce geospatial survey reports using computer software

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S16

Apply quality assurance procedures: site work, drawing, model or report

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S17

Manage time and tasks to meet project deadlines

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S18

Comply with relevant industry legislation and regulations when undertaking geospatial work

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S19

Communicate in writing with others, for example internal and external customers, colleagues, and managers

Back to Grading
Project with questions
S20

Comply with environmental, social, human and economic sustainability regulations and requirements, for example safe disposal of waste, re-cycling or re-use of materials, efficient use of resources, contributing to the community, volunteering within the geospatial industry

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Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Collaborate within teams, across disciplines and external stakeholders in a professional manner

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Project with questions
B2

Respond and adapt to work demands and situations

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Project with questions
B3

Committed to continued professional development (CPD) to maintain and enhance competence in own area of practice

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Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
B4

Support equity, diversity and inclusivity in the workplace

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Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated
B5

Take personal responsibility for their own health and safety

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Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Multiple-choice test

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour

Project with questions

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Planning and site surveys
K4 K5 K8
S5 S6 S8 S9
B1

Methods of interpreting and extracting relevant design information from clients' drawings and specifications: 2D and 3D drawings, PDF plans, paper plots (K4)

Methods to locate sites and plan route (K5)

Site visits: site reconnaissance, planning and liaison and constraints (K8)

Interpret information from client drawings and specifications (S5)

Gather and interpret information from a range of sources (S6)

Plan surveys selecting survey equipment for a project according to the client's specification (S8)

Planning routes to existing and new sites (S9)

Collaborate within teams, across disciplines and external stakeholders in a professional manner (B1)

Undertake site surveys
K10 K12 K14 K16
S10 S12 S13
B2

Methods of control on site: static positioning, closed traverses, networks and levelling (manual and digital) (K10)

Co-ordinate systems: projections, transformations and datums (K12)

Methods of capturing site survey data: topographic, river sections, drainage invert surveys, volumetric calculations, as built surveys and measured building surveys (K14)

Survey equipment used to capture data: total stations, levels, laser scanners, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) (K16)

Establish a survey control on site for example using total station, GNSS or levels (S10)

Use survey equipment, for example total stations, levels, laser scanners, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) using geodetic parameters (S12)

Capture and record geospatial survey data, for example topographic, river sections, drainage invert surveys, volumetric calculations, as-built surveys and measured building surveys (S13)

Respond and adapt to work demands and situations (B2)

Producing reports
K6 K18 K21
S14 S15 S19

Principles and use of surveying processing software packages (K6)

Contents of geospatial survey: data, information and drawings (K18)

Written communication techniques: report writing, email (K21)

Select and use surveying processing software for processing data into either 2D or 3D drawing's or 3D models (S14)

Produce geospatial survey reports using computer software (S15)

Communicate in writing with others, for example internal and external customers, colleagues, and managers (S19)

None

Quality assurance
K3 K19
S16 S18

Industry legislation and regulations that apply to working in the geospatial profession (K3)

Quality assurance procedures of work and drawings: importance of accuracy, precision, types of errors, outliers and standard deviation (K19)

Apply quality assurance procedures: site work, drawing, model or report (S16)

Comply with relevant industry legislation and regulations when undertaking geospatial work (S18)

None

Time Management
K22
S17

Geospatial project lifecycle: recording information, client time, timesheets, meeting deadlines and completing work (K22)

Manage time and tasks to meet project deadlines (S17)

None

Interview underpinned by portfolio of evidence - integrated

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Interview underpinned by portfolio
K2 K7 K13 K20 K23 K25 K26 K27
S1 S2 S3 S4 S7 S11 S20
B3 B4 B5

Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS), site hazards, lines of reporting and required control measures (K2)

Handling, adjustment checks, calibration and security of survey equipment on and off site (K7)

Traditional and modern equipment and techniques of setting engineering: measuring tapes and string, distances and bearings, total station using co-ordinates to peg out, grid lines and off set (K13)

Verbal communication techniques: giving and receiving information and matching style to audience (K20)

The Four Pillars of Sustainability: Environmental, Social, Human and Economic (K23)

Requirements for continual personal development within the industry and the opportunities for career progression (K25)

Signs of wellbeing and mental health within the workplace, and signposting to available support (K26)

Inclusion, equity and diversity in the workplace (K27)

Comply with health and safety regulations (S1)

Plan and prepare Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS) and report any additional controls required (S2)

Select and use personal protective equipment (PPE) (S3)

Carry out adjustment checks on survey equipment (S4)

Communicate with others verbally, for example colleagues and stakeholders (S7)

Use setting engineering equipment and techniques, for example measuring tapes and string, distances and bearings, total station using co-ordinates to peg out co-ordinates, grid lines and off sets (S11)

Comply with environmental, social, human and economic sustainability regulations and requirements, for example safe disposal of waste, re-cycling or re-use of materials, efficient use of resources, contributing to the community, volunteering within the geospatial industry (S20)

Committed to continued professional development (CPD) to maintain and enhance competence in own area of practice (B3)

Support equity, diversity and inclusivity in the workplace (B4)

Take personal responsibility for their own health and safety (B5)

Employers involved in creating the standard: Cambridge Regional College, Cat Surveys, Chartered Institute of Civil Engineering Surveyors, chconsultancy, Cronton College, J S Consultants UK Ltd, Leica Geosystems, Malcolm Hughes Land Surveyors, Maltby Surveys, Murphy Geospatial, Powers, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, Storm Geomatics, Survey School, Tideway, Topcon

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 Occupational standard, end-point assessment plan and funding band revised. 08/01/2024 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 27/02/2018 07/01/2024 Not set

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