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Forest craftsperson

Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST1321
  3. Version: 1.0
  4. Level: 3
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 24 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Maximum funding: £14000
  8. Route: Agriculture, environmental and animal care
  9. Date updated: 08/09/2022
  10. Approved for delivery: 18 August 2022
  11. Lars code: 683
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual
  13. Review:

    This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

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Contents

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Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Carry out the practical operations required to create, maintain and harvest forests and woodlands.

Occupation summary

Rate and provide feedback for this webpage template here

This occupation is found in forestry and land management. This includes governmental, non-governmental, private, public, charitable and local authority organisations in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that have an interest in forestry and woodland creation and management. Landowning organisations or private estates may employ their own forest craftsperson(s) and or use contractors who employ forest craftspersons.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to carry out the practical operations required to create, maintain and harvest forests and woodlands. Most employers will specialise in either establishment and maintenance, or harvesting. Employees in both sub-sectors would be expected to be aware of the full range of forestry operations, and to understand the commercial, environmental and social impacts of forestry. Establishment and maintenance operatives will carry out the range of duties required to prepare the ground, plant trees and undertake ongoing maintenance, including weeding, beating up and pruning. Harvesting operatives will carry out the range of duties required to fell, process and extract trees and timber. This occupation works predominantly in either established forests, woodlands or on open land. They need to be able and willing to do practical work outdoors in all weathers. Forestry and woodland sites are often in remote locations and the ability to travel independently to access sites is advantageous.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with colleagues including land owners, team leaders or work supervisors, and forest craftspersons. They may need to communicate with members of the public and other land management operatives in the course of their work.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for initiating and completing their own work to specification, with minimal supervision, ensuring they meet set deadlines. They are responsible for meeting quality requirements and working in accordance with legislation, environmental, health, safety and welfare considerations. They are accountable for the health and safety of themselves and others. They are expected to exercise responsibility, autonomy and judgement within limited parameters. They perform tasks that are complex and non-routine and may be in a variety of contexts. Forest operatives are responsible for checking their tools, equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE) are maintained and safe to use. They report to team leaders and or works supervisors.

Typical job titles include:

Chainsaw operator Green leaf Forest craftsperson Green leaf Forest worker Green leaf Tree establishment operative or contractor Green leaf

Duties

  • Duty 1 Implement health and safety legislation, industry guidance and organisational policies, (for example erecting warning signs at entry points to a worksite.)
  • Duty 2 Implement biosecurity legislation, industry guidance and organisational policies, (for example disinfecting footwear, tools and equipment before entering, leaving and travelling between work sites.)
  • Duty 3 Implement pollution control in line with legislation, industry guidance and organisational policies, (for example positioning a spill-kit appropriately prior to refuelling a chainsaw.)
  • Duty 4 Plant trees
  • Duty 5 Clear vegetation (for example cleaning, brashing)
  • Duty 6 Measure and select trees for removal.
  • Duty 7 Fell small trees.
  • Duty 8 Maintain forest infrastructure, (for example repair a damaged deer fence.)
  • Duty 9 Operate and maintain forestry tools, equipment and machinery.
  • Duty 10 Monitor and control the impact of pests, diseases and disorders.
  • Duty 11 Maintain records including digital records and reports.
  • Duty 12 Communicate with supervisor, colleagues, public and others
  • Duty 13 Use geographical tools including Global Positioning Systems (GPS), maps and plans.
  • Duty 14 (Establishment and maintenance) Manage vegetation (for example pruning and high pruning)
  • Duty 15 (Establishment and maintenance) Maintain trees (for example weeding and respacing.)
  • Duty 16 (Harvesting) Measure and select trees for harvesting
  • Duty 17 (Harvesting) Harvest trees and prepare timber for extraction
  • Duty 18 (Harvesting) Extract timber

Apprenticeship summary

ST1321, forest craftsperson level 3


This summary page outlines the information that you and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should also read the end-point assessment plan for the full details including roles and responsibilities, assessment method requirements and re-sits and re-takes.


What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of the apprenticeship. It assesses your competence against the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) on the occupational standard. You will have been trained on them during your training, both on and off the job. The EPA is your chance to show an independent assessor you can do the occupation you have been trained for. Your employer will only recommend you start the EPA when you have finished your training and both your employer and you think you are ready. Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should provide you with support on what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA. 

The typical length of the on-programme (training) part of this apprenticeship is 24 months. The end-point assessment period will typically last 3 months.

The grades available for this apprenticeship are:

Practical assessment with questions

Multiple-choice test

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

At the end of the apprenticeship, and having passed the EPA, you will be awarded with your apprenticeship certificate.

Gateway

The gateway is the point when all on-programme training and any mandatory qualification requirements have been met. When you have completed your training and your employer says you are competent in your occupation, you enter the gateway. The EPAO will check any mandatory qualifications are complete. They will tell you how to submit any necessary documents (for example, a portfolio). After the EPAO confirms that you have met all the requirements, the EPA starts.  

When you reach the gateway, you need to complete the following: 

Have achieved English and mathematics qualifications (including those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement) as specified by the apprenticeship funding rules. British Sign Language (BSL) qualifications are an alternative to English qualifications for those who have BSL as their primary language.

For the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence you must submit: portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

Apprentices must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by the professional discussion. The portfolio of evidence will typically contain 15 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence should be mapped against the KSBs.

Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested. Evidence sources may include:

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the professional discussion. Independent assessors should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the professional discussion assessment method. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

Passed any other mandated qualifications listed in the occupational standard. For the forest craftsperson,
The qualification(s) required are: 
(Core) QNUK Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work +F (RQF) or QA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid +F (RQF) or FAA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid


(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-cutting or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-Cutting


(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Felling and Processing Trees up to 380mm or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Felling Small Trees up to 380mm


(Establishment & Maintenance) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in Safe Use of Pesticides or City & Guilds Level 2 Principles of safe handling and application of pesticides


(Establishment and Maintenance) ) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in the Safe Application of Pesticide Using Hand Held Equipment or City & Guilds Level 2 Award In The Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment


(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Brush-cutters and Trimmers


(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Forestry Clearing Saw


(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Severing Uprooted or Windblown Trees Using a Chainsaw or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Individual Windblown Trees


(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Felling and Processing Trees over 380mm or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Felling and Processing Medium Trees Over 380mm and up to 760mm



Assessment methods



Practical assessment: you will be observed by the independent assessor completing a task or set of tasks that they give you. These tasks will be similar to your normal work. All equipment and information will be provided, and you will be told where this will take place. The practical assessment will last 210 hours. You will be asked a minimum of 12 questions by the independent assessor about the task(s). You will get at least 14 days notice of practical assessment.




Test / examination: you will be asked to complete a multiple-choice test. The EPAO will let you know if this is at an assessment centre or if it can be completed remotely. The test will be closed book so you will not be able to have any books or reference materials.
 The following equipment is permitted in the test:

calculator

writing materials

The test will have 30 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes to complete the multiple-choice test. There will be 4 possible answers but only 1 will be correct. Each correct answer with be worth 1 mark.

To achieve a pass, you need to get between 20 and 24 questions correct.
To achieve a distinction, you need to get between 25 and 30 questions correct.
You will get at least 14days notice of the test.





Discussion: you will meet with the independent assessor in a quiet place that is free from distractions and be asked questions. The professional discussion will last 70 hours and the independent assessor will ask a minimum of 12 questions to find out how well you can do your job. This method may take place remotely, though the EPAO will confirm the details. You will be given at least 14 days notice of the professional discussion.


Who to contact for help or more information

If you have a query that relates to your job, then please speak to your employer. You should speak to your training provider if you have any other questions about the apprenticeship including the end-point assessment. You should get detailed support from the EPAO before the EPA begins. Your employer and training provide should talk to you when they think you are ready to take the EPA. The EPA is for you to show how good you are at your job. You should speak to your training provider about what to expect in the EPA and how to prepare. You should speak to the EPAO if your EPA has already started, and you have a query.


Reasonable adjustments


If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.

Professional recognition

Professional body recognition is not relevant to this occupational apprenticeship.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

Rate and provide feedback for this webpage template here

This occupation is found in forestry and land management. This includes governmental, non-governmental, private, public, charitable and local authority organisations in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that have an interest in forestry and woodland creation and management. Landowning organisations or private estates may employ their own forest craftsperson(s) and or use contractors who employ forest craftspersons.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to carry out the practical operations required to create, maintain and harvest forests and woodlands. Most employers will specialise in either establishment and maintenance, or harvesting. Employees in both sub-sectors would be expected to be aware of the full range of forestry operations, and to understand the commercial, environmental and social impacts of forestry. Establishment and maintenance operatives will carry out the range of duties required to prepare the ground, plant trees and undertake ongoing maintenance, including weeding, beating up and pruning. Harvesting operatives will carry out the range of duties required to fell, process and extract trees and timber. This occupation works predominantly in either established forests, woodlands or on open land. They need to be able and willing to do practical work outdoors in all weathers. Forestry and woodland sites are often in remote locations and the ability to travel independently to access sites is advantageous.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with colleagues including land owners, team leaders or work supervisors, and forest craftspersons. They may need to communicate with members of the public and other land management operatives in the course of their work.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for initiating and completing their own work to specification, with minimal supervision, ensuring they meet set deadlines. They are responsible for meeting quality requirements and working in accordance with legislation, environmental, health, safety and welfare considerations. They are accountable for the health and safety of themselves and others. They are expected to exercise responsibility, autonomy and judgement within limited parameters. They perform tasks that are complex and non-routine and may be in a variety of contexts. Forest operatives are responsible for checking their tools, equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE) are maintained and safe to use. They report to team leaders and or works supervisors.

Typical job titles include:

Chainsaw operator Green leaf Forest craftsperson Green leaf Forest worker Green leaf Tree establishment operative or contractor Green leaf

Core occupation duties

Duty

KSBs

Duty 1 Implement health and safety legislation, industry guidance and organisational policies, (for example erecting warning signs at entry points to a worksite.)

K1 K7 K8 K11 K12 K14 K15 K16 K22 K23

S1 S5 S7 S8 S10 S11 S14 S15 S18 S19 S21 S22

B3 B5 B6

Duty 2 Implement biosecurity legislation, industry guidance and organisational policies, (for example disinfecting footwear, tools and equipment before entering, leaving and travelling between work sites.)

K2 K3 K7 K14 K15 K20 K22 K23

S2 S5 S6 S10 S13 S15 S18 S19 S21 S23

B3 B6

Duty 3 Implement pollution control in line with legislation, industry guidance and organisational policies, (for example positioning a spill-kit appropriately prior to refuelling a chainsaw.)

K2 K11 K12

S2 S5 S7 S8 S13 S18 S21

Duty 4 Plant trees

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K8 K9 K10 K12 K14 K15 K16 K19

S1 S2 S3 S6 S8 S11 S12 S13 S14 S16

B1 B2 B4 B5 B6

Duty 5 Clear vegetation (for example cleaning, brashing)

K1 K2 K4 K7 K8 K12 K15 K16

S1 S2 S3 S5 S8 S11 S12 S13 S14

B5 B6

Duty 6 Measure and select trees for removal.

K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K9 K15

S2 S3 S4 S5 S11 S12 S13 S15

Duty 7 Fell small trees.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K7 K9 K12 K14 K15 K16

S1 S2 S3 S5 S8 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14

B1 B4 B5 B6

Duty 8 Maintain forest infrastructure, (for example repair a damaged deer fence.)

K1 K2 K4 K7 K11 K12 K15 K16

S1 S2 S3 S5 S7 S8 S11 S12 S13 S14

B2 B4 B5 B6

Duty 9 Operate and maintain forestry tools, equipment and machinery.

K1 K2 K4 K12 K13 K14 K16 K22

S1 S3 S8 S9 S10 S19

B1

Duty 10 Monitor and control the impact of pests, diseases and disorders.

K2 K15

S2 S11 S13 S15

Duty 11 Maintain records including digital records and reports.

K14

S10

Duty 12 Communicate with supervisor, colleagues, public and others

K14 K15 K17 K19 K21

S10 S11 S15 S16 S17

B2 B3 B6

Duty 13 Use geographical tools including Global Positioning Systems (GPS), maps and plans.

K14

S10 S12 S15

B3

Option duties

Establishment and maintenance duties

Duty

KSBs

Duty 14 Manage vegetation (for example pruning and high pruning)

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K7 K9 K15 K16 K18 K19 K21

S1 S2 S3 S5 S8 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S18

B1 B2 B3 B5 B6

Duty 15 Maintain trees (for example weeding and respacing.)

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K7 K8 K9 K12 K14 K15 K16 K20 K22

S1 S2 S3 S5 S6 S8 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S17 S19

B1 B2 B4 B5

Harvesting duties

Duty

KSBs

Duty 16 Measure and select trees for harvesting

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K10 K11 K13 K15 K23 K24

B1 B4 B5 B6

Duty 17 Harvest trees and prepare timber for extraction

K1 K2 K3 K4 K6 K12 K15 K16 K23 K24

S1 S2 S3 S4 S8 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S15 S20 S21 S22 S23

B1 B4 B5 B6

Duty 18 Extract timber

K1 K2 K15 K16 K23

S1 S2 S11 S13 S23 S24

B5 B6


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Health and safety legislation, codes of practice (including Forest Industry Safety Accord guidance) and policies, including risk assessment. Back to Duty

K2: Biosecurity and environmental legislation, codes of practice and policies including pollution control. Back to Duty

K3: Principles of silvicultural practice in the UK including those most commonly used, their application, and the UK Forestry Standard Back to Duty

K4: Methods to identify trees and woodland plants including botanical keys taking account of seasonality. Back to Duty

K5: Plant and tree biology, physiology, lifecycles, growing conditions, landscape and timber properties. Back to Duty

K6: Techniques for measuring standing trees Back to Duty

K7: Techniques for felling small trees and removing unwanted vegetation. Back to Duty

K8: Techniques for planting, supporting and protecting trees and their suitability to different situations including site conditions. Back to Duty

K9: Implications of tree establishment activities on the end product and impact on decision-making process. Back to Duty

K10: Timber supply chain (for example timber markets and processing) and the actors within it including roles and responsibilities. Back to Duty

K11: Maintenance requirements for forest infrastructure, for example boundaries and rides. Back to Duty

K12: Maintenance, operational requirements and legislation for tools, equipment, machinery, vehicles and attachments.  Back to Duty

K13: Techniques for identification and control of tree pests, diseases and disorders, including impacts of pests and diseases on timber and the wider environment, and the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM). Back to Duty

K14: The importance of maintaining records including digital records and reports Back to Duty

K15: Techniques for communicating with technical and non-technical audiences and the importance of effective communication in the workplace with colleagues, customers and the public. Back to Duty

K16: Implications of changes in conditions, situations and working environments. Back to Duty

K17: The importance of recording a portfolio of experience and learning to aid career progression. Back to Duty

K18: The environmental, social and economic value of sustainable forest management. Back to Duty

K19: Methods for storing, transporting and handling trees and importance for tree health and establishment. Back to Duty

K20: (Establishment & maintenance) Techniques for protecting and maintaining plants after planting including purpose, timings and suitability to site conditions. Back to Duty

K21: (Establishment & maintenance) Methods of managing and controlling unwanted vegetation throughout the life cycle of the tree(s). Back to Duty

K22: (Establishment & maintenance) Methods for controlling vegetation or pests by chemical means (for example pesticides or organic equivalents). Back to Duty

K23: (Harvesting) Harvesting and extraction systems including tree felling and the factors affecting the cost of bringing timber to market. Back to Duty

K24: (Harvesting) Techniques for calculating timber in standing and felled trees Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Plan, implement, monitor and review health, safety and welfare of self and others, including creating risk assessments, legislative requirements and organisational policies. Back to Duty

S2: Plan, implement, check and report environmental mitigation measures, including legal compliance, organisational policies and risk assessment. Back to Duty

S3: Identify common forestry trees and woodland plants using scientific names. Back to Duty

S4: Measure trees for assessment of timber volumes. Back to Duty

S5: Identify and control unwanted vegetation including felling small trees using hand and motor manual tools. Back to Duty

S6: Plant trees including providing support and protection. Back to Duty

S7: Monitor and maintain forest and woodland infrastructure for example boundaries and rides. Back to Duty

S8: Operate and maintain tools, equipment and machinery safely in line with legislation and manufacturers guidance, for example winches, chainsaws or tractors. Back to Duty

S9: Monitor and control the impact of pests, diseases and disorders. Back to Duty

S10: Maintain records including digital records and reports. Back to Duty

S11: Communicate to technical and non-technical audiences including the use of verbal and written techniques. Back to Duty

S12: Interpret maps, plans and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Back to Duty

S13: Store and dispose of waste in accordance with regulations, for example chemicals, organic and inorganic waste, pollution and biosecurity controls. Back to Duty

S14: Load, unload and transport materials and equipment relative to the business Back to Duty

S15: Process information and communicate using digital technology for example emails, word processing software, video meeting software or applications for recording and sharing information. Back to Duty

S16: Store and handle trees to minimise negative impacts and maximise establishment potential. Back to Duty

S17: (Establishment & maintenance) Protect and maintain plants after planting including weeding, cleaning, re-spacing, beating up and application of products to prevent unwanted vegetation (for example mulch mat). Back to Duty

S18: (Establishment & maintenance) Improve quality of tree crop, including brashing and formative pruning. Back to Duty

S19: (Establishment & maintenance) Control vegetation or pests by chemical means (biocides or organic equivalents). Back to Duty

S20: (Harvesting) Select trees for harvesting. Back to Duty

S21: (Harvesting) Fell large trees motor-manually including use of assisted fell techniques. Back to Duty

S22: (Harvesting) Use hand winches in forestry. Back to Duty

S23: (Harvesting) Prepare timber for extraction including snedding, measuring, cross cutting and sorting timber to product specification. Back to Duty

S24: (Harvesting) Calculate timber volumes using mensuration techniques. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Takes ownership of work including attention to detail, spatial awareness and stamina. Back to Duty

B2: Team-focused and works effectively with colleagues and others Back to Duty

B3: Committed to keeping up to date with industry best practice and seeks to continuously improve and develop. Back to Duty

B4: Ability to work outdoors in all weather conditions. Back to Duty

B5: Puts safety first for themselves and others Back to Duty

B6: Respectful of others and tailors communication to audience. Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

(Core) QNUK Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work +F (RQF) or QA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid +F (RQF) or FAA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid

Level: 3

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-cutting or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-Cutting

Level: 2

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Felling and Processing Trees up to 380mm or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Felling Small Trees up to 380mm

Level: 2

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Establishment & Maintenance) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in Safe Use of Pesticides or City & Guilds Level 2 Principles of safe handling and application of pesticides

Level: 2

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Establishment and Maintenance) ) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in the Safe Application of Pesticide Using Hand Held Equipment or City & Guilds Level 2 Award In The Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment

Level: 2

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Brush-cutters and Trimmers

Level: 2

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Forestry Clearing Saw

Level: 2

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Severing Uprooted or Windblown Trees Using a Chainsaw or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Individual Windblown Trees

Level: 3

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Felling and Processing Trees over 380mm or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Felling and Processing Medium Trees Over 380mm and up to 760mm

Level: 3

Ofqual regulated

JustificationThe Forest Industry Safety Accord (FISA) Safety Guide 804 (https://ukfisa.com/Safety/Safety-Guides/fisa-805) which sets out safe practice in training and certification states: For professional chainsaw operators working in forestry, FISA recommends that the minimum level of adequacy of training for chainsaw operations – including aerial tree work, pruning and dismantling – be confirmed by an independent assessment, leading to recognised qualifications (previously referred to as certificates of competence). This is also a common requirement in contracts of service.As recognised most forest land owners will therefore require certificates of competence for workers before they award contracts. For example Forestry Commission (https://www.forestryengland.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Pre%20commencement%20Meeting.pdf) require all contractors prior to commencing work to demonstrate that their staff have the relevant certificates of competence to the work site. These include specifically for chainsaw use, crosscut, maintenance, felling small trees, felling large trees and windblown trees, depending upon what types of trees are in the contract. Not in the public domain is a more detailed list that includes first aid (+F) and a range of operator tickets. This means that these certificates must be held to work on forestry commission sites (a significant part of the England forest estate) for the apprentice to be able to work on these contracts. In addition, most insurers of forestry works will require that training and certification meet the FISA recommendations, again limiting opportunities for apprentices to work if they are not certificated. Users of professional products are required to hold a certificate showing they have sufficient knowledge of the subjects listed in Annex I of Guidance on the requirements of the Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 (https://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/using-pesticides/codes-of-practice/guidance-sustainable-use-ppp-regs-2012.htm). This activity is regulated and the qualifications mandated in the standards are all listed in the approved certificates for this purpose. Notes on pesticides (not for submission!)PA1 does still exist for C&G but I don’t think it is a regulated qualification unlike the PA6. The handbook is here: https://www.nptc.org.uk/assets/documents/ee2499867db446fba35f0d2eacd38031.pdf

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

Version 1.0

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the forest craftsperson apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Forest craftsperson apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 24 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a forest craftsperson. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 3 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - practical assessment with questions:

Assessment method 2 - multiple-choice test:

Assessment method 3 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

EPA summary table

On-programme (typically 24 months)

The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications (including those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement) as specified by the apprenticeship funding rules, if required. British Sign Language (BSL) qualifications are an alternative to English qualifications for those who have BSL as their primary language.

The apprentice must complete training towards any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard.

The qualification(s) required are:

(Core) QNUK Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work +F (RQF) or QA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid +F (RQF) or FAA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid

(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-cutting or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-Cutting

(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Felling and Processing Trees up to 380mm or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Felling Small Trees up to 380mm

(Establishment & Maintenance) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in Safe Use of Pesticides or City & Guilds Level 2 Principles of safe handling and application of pesticides

(Establishment and Maintenance) ) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in the Safe Application of Pesticide Using Hand Held Equipment or City & Guilds Level 2 Award In The Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment

(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Brush-cutters and Trimmers

(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Forestry Clearing Saw

(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Severing Uprooted or Windblown Trees Using a Chainsaw or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Individual Windblown Trees

(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Felling and Processing Trees over 380mm or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Felling and Processing Medium Trees Over 380mm and up to 760mm

End-point assessment gateway

The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

is working at or above the occupational standard as a forest craftsperson
has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have passed any other qualifications listed in the forest craftsperson occupational standard ST1321.

The qualification(s) required are:

(Core) QNUK Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work +F (RQF) or QA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid +F (RQF) or FAA Level 3 Award in Forestry First Aid

The qualification(s) required are:

(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-cutting or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Chainsaw Maintenance and Cross-Cutting

The qualification(s) required are:

(Core) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award In Felling and Processing Trees up to 380mm or City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate of Competence in Felling Small Trees up to 380mm

The qualification(s) required are:

(Establishment & Maintenance) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in Safe Use of Pesticides or City & Guilds Level 2 Principles of safe handling and application of pesticides

The qualification(s) required are:

(Establishment and Maintenance) ) Lantra Awards Level 2 Award in the Safe Application of Pesticide Using Hand Held Equipment or City & Guilds Level 2 Award In The Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment

The qualification(s) required are:

(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Brush-cutters and Trimmers

The qualification(s) required are:

(Establishment and Maintenance) City & Guilds NPTC Level 2 Award In the Safe Use of Forestry Clearing Saw

The qualification(s) required are:

(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Severing Uprooted or Windblown Trees Using a Chainsaw or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Individual Windblown Trees

The qualification(s) required are:

(Harvesting) Lantra Awards Level 3 Award In Felling and Processing Trees over 380mm or City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate of Competence in Felling and Processing Medium Trees Over 380mm and up to 760mm

The apprentice must achieve all of the qualifications listed in the Forest craftsperson occupational standard ST1321 relevant to their chosen option.

The apprentice must have achieved English and mathematics qualifications at Level 1. (For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and mathematics minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. British Sign Language (BSL) qualifications are an alternative to English qualifications for those who have BSL as their primary language).

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment (typically 3 months)

Grades available for each method:

Practical assessment with questions

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Multiple-choice test

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction

Re-sits and re-takes



  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: distinction
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically 2 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically 4 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA will be taken within the EPA period. The EPA period begins when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements are met and is typically 3 months.

The expectation is that the EPAO will confirm the gateway requirements are met and the EPA begins as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think their apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard. The apprentice will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and mathematics (including those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement) as specified by the apprenticeship funding rules. British Sign Language (BSL) qualifications are an alternative to English qualifications for those who have BSL as their primary language.

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

Apprentices must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by the professional discussion. The portfolio of evidence will typically contain 15 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence should be mapped against the KSBs.

Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested. Evidence sources may include:

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the professional discussion. Independent assessors should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the professional discussion assessment method. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Practical assessment with questions

Overview

In a practical assessment, the independent assessor observes the apprentice completing a task or series of tasks set by the EPAO. The EPAO decides where it takes place, and the test environment must closely relate to the apprentice’s natural working environment.

The practical and responses to questions must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade for the practical assessment.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

Delivery

Apprentices must be observed by an independent assessor completing 3 tasks (two from core and one from their selected option) in the practical assessment, in which they will be assessed against the KSBs assigned to this assessment method.

The practical assessment with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade.

The independent assessor must only observe one apprentice to ensure quality and rigour and they must be as unobtrusive as possible.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days' notice of the practical assessment.

The practical assessment with questions must take 210 minutes.

The independent assessor can increase the time of the practical assessment with questions by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete a task or respond to a question if necessary. The practical assessment and questioning must allow the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs at the highest possible grade.

The practical assessment with questions may take place in parts but must be completed within 1 working day(s). A working day is typically considered to be 7.5 hours long. The reason for this split is that they are likely to be at different locations on the site and are discreet and separate tasks.

EPAOs must manage invigilation of apprentices at all times to maintain security of the EPA, in line with their malpractice policy. This includes breaks and moving between locations.

The independent assessor must explain to the apprentice the format and timescales of the practical assessment with questions before it begins. This does not count towards the assessment time.

The independent assessor should observe the following during the practical assessment:

task 1: monitor and maintain forest and woodland infrastructure (core). this should take 80 minutes overall – 65 minutes observing the task and 15 minutes for questioning.

task 2: plant trees including providing support and protection (core). this should take 50 minutes overall – 40 minutes observing the task and 10 minutes for questioning.

task 3: one of these tasks will be completed depending on the option selected:

These activities provide the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs as shown in the mapping.

Questions must be asked. The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to to test underpinning knowledge and any KSBs that were not demonstrated during the practical.

Questions must be asked after each test. The total duration of the practical is 210 minutes and the time for questioning is included in the overall assessment time. The total time for the practical element is 170 minutes. The time allocated for questioning is 40 minutes.

The independent assessor must ask at least 12 questions - 4 per each task/activity. Follow-up questions are allowed. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training

The independent assessor can ask questions to clarify answers given by the apprentice. These questions are in addition to the set number of questions for the practical assessment with questions and should be kept to a minimum. The independent assessor can also ask questions to clarify answers given by the apprentice.

The independent assessor conducts and assesses the practical assessment with questions. They must record the KSBs observed, KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions and the grade achieved. The apprentice’s answers to questions must also be recorded.

The independent assessor makes all grading decisions.

Assessment location

The practical assessment with questions will take place in a simulated environment selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises). The simulated environment must relate to the apprentice’s natural work environment. Equipment and resources needed for the practical assessment with questions must be provided by the EPAO, who can liaise with the employer to provide these.

There should be a designated point of contact for the site if not owned by the EPAO. This could be someone from either the training provider or employer. Due to the remoteness and vast areas that the site may cover this is necessary to ensure apprentices and independent assessors are aware of various key points within the site and have someone to refer to if guidance about logistics is required. They are not directly involved with the practical assessment. This may be as simple as guiding the independent assessor and candidate to the relevant areas of the forest or site.

Questioning that occurs after each test of the practical assessment with questions should take place in a quiet space, free from distractions and influence

Question and resource development

EPAOs must write an assessment specification and question bank. The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs shown in the mapping. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. EPAOs should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The assessment specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

EPAOs will develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place. For example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. EPAOs will ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard.

EPAOs must ensure that apprentices have a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAOs must produce the following materials to support the practical assessment with questions:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and employer

Multiple-choice test

Overview

A test is an assessment for asking questions in a controlled and invigilated environment.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

would be difficult in the other assessment methods.

Delivery

This method must be appropriately structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade.

The multiple-choice test can be computer or paper based.

The multiple-choice test will consist of 30 multiple-choice questions.

Multiple-choice questions will have four options, including one correct answer.

Apprentices must be given at least 14 days' notice of the date and time of the multiple-choice test.

Test administration

Apprentices must have 60 minutes to complete the test.

The multiple-choice test is closed book which means that the apprentice cannot refer to reference books or materials whilst taking the test.

The following equipment is allowed to be used during the multiple-choice test:

calculator

writing materials

The multiple-choice test must be taken in the presence of an invigilator who is the responsibility of the EPAO. Specialised (proctor) software can be used if the test can be taken on-line, to ensure the security of the test.

The EPAO must have an invigilation policy setting out how the multiple-choice test must be conducted. It must state the ratio of apprentices to invigilators for the setting and allow the test to take place in a secure way.

The EPAO must verify the identity of the apprentice.

The EPAO is responsible for the security of the multiple-choice test including the arrangements for on-line testing. The EPAO must ensure that their security arrangements maintain the validity and reliability of the multiple-choice test.

Marking

The multiple-choice test must be marked by independent assessors or markers employed by the EPAO. They must follow a marking scheme produced by the EPAO. Marking by computer is allowed where question types support this.

A correct answer gets 1 mark.

Any incorrect or missing answers get zero marks.

The EPAO is responsible for overseeing the marking of the multiple-choice test. The EPAO must ensure standardisation and moderation of written response test.

Assessment location

Apprentices must take the multiple-choice test in a suitably controlled and invigilated environment that is a quiet room, free from distractions and influence. The EPAO must check the venue is suitable.

The multiple-choice test could take place remotely if the appropriate technology and systems are in place to prevent malpractice. EPAOs must verify the apprentice’s identity and ensure invigilation of apprentices for example with, and not limited to, 360-degree cameras and screen sharing facilities.

Question and resource development

EPAOs must write a test specification and question bank. The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs shown in the mapping. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. EPAOs should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The test specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

EPAOs will develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place, for example, considering previous item performance data, item analysis, standardisation, training and moderation. EPAOs will ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard.

EPAOs must ensure that apprentices have a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAOs must produce the following materials to support the multiple-choice test:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • test specification
    • sample test and mark schemes
    • live tests and mark schemes
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and employer

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the professional discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate their competency across the KSBs as shown in the mapping.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to:

- assess the KSBs mapped to this method against the grading descriptors

- explore aspects of work, including how it was carried out, in more detail

- require the apprentice to draw on their portfolio of evidence to demonstrate the KSBs

The independent assessor should ask a minimum of 12 questions to provide the apprentice with the opportunity to cover the full range of KSBs mapped to this method.

The topics and themes that must be covered are:

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days' notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 4 week(s) to review the supporting documentation.

Apprentices must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

Apprentices can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence, however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 70 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

For the professional discussion, the independent assessor must ask at least 12 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training. The professional discussion must allow the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method at the highest possible grade.

The independent assessor conducts and assesses the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. The records must include the KSBs met, the grade achieved and answers to questions.

The independent assessor will make all grading decisions.

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

EPAOs must write an assessment specification and question bank. The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs shown in the mapping. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. EPAOs should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The assessment specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

EPAOs will develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place, for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. EPAOs will ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard.

EPAOs must ensure that apprentices have a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAOs must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and employer

Grading

Practical assessment with questions

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme

KSBs

Pass

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors

Distinction

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors

(Core) Environment
S2 S13

Plans and implements the environmental mitigation measures for a forestry activity, including the storage and disposal of waste and biosecurity in line with legislation and organisational policies. Checks and reports in alignment with the risk assessment. (S2, S13)

 

Explains their mitigations with reference to relevant codes of practice. (S2)

 

 

(Core) Forest infrastructure
K11 S7 B1

Checks condition of forest infrastructure to ensure functionality. Maintains and repairs forest and woodland infrastructure to instructions. Demonstrates ownership of work, spatial awareness and stamina. (K11, S7, B1)

Identifies long term improvements that reduce future maintenance requirements, make cost savings or improve functionality. (K11, S7)

(Core) Health, safety and welfare
K16 S1 B5 B6

Plans and implements health, safety and welfare for self and others including writing a risk assessment for an activity and monitoring, reviewing and communicating this, identifying and adapting to any changes, conditions, situations and working environments. (K16, S1, B5, B6)

Justifies their assessment of risk and mitigating actions. (S1, B5)

 

 

(Core) Maps and plans
S12

Interprets maps and plans to identify site constraints and features. Uses GPS to identify the exact location of activity for an emergency plan. (S12)

n/a

(Core) Measuring
K6 S4

Measures diameter at breast height (DBH) and height of trees to enable calculation of timber volumes. Records results accurately. (K6, S4)

n/a

(Core) Planting
K8 K19 S6 S16

Stores and handles trees preventing damage and death and maximising establishment potential.  (K19, S16)

Plants trees and installs protection in line with planting plans and tree type. Demonstrates the correct planting technique(s) in line with organisational guidance.  Indicates why the planting technique is suitable for site or conditions. (K8, S6)

 

 

n/a

(Core) Transport materials
S14

Loads, unloads and transports materials and equipment taking actions to prevent damage to the materials or injury to personnel. (S14)

Loads, unloads and transports materials and equipment, and plans activities to reduce labour and increase efficiency.  (S14)

 

(Core) Tools, equipment and machinery
K12 S8

Sets up operates and maintains tools, equipment and machinery in accordance with manufacturers’ guidance and relevant legislation, carrying out safety checks, and using relevant safety features and protective equipment when operating (K12, S8)

 

Explains the potential impact of not maintaining or operating equipment to the required standard on personnel, the organisation and the environment. (K12, S8)

 

(Establishment and maintenance) Improve tree crop
K21 S18

Carries out brashing and formative pruning, explaining how this improves the quality of the tree crop and when in the lifecycle stages it is needed. (K21, S18) 

 

 

Explains how to achieve balance between timber quality and tree health. (K21, S18)

 

(Harvesting) Mensuration
K24 S24

Calculates  timber volumes accurately in standing and felled trees. (K24, S24)

 

Explains the importance of applying the appropriate technique and the potential consequences of under or over-estimations, using accurate terminology. (K24, S24)

(Harvesting) Timber processing
S23

Prepares timber for extraction, including snedding, measuring accurately, cross cutting and sorting timber to a product specification. (S23)

n/a

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme

KSBs

Pass

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors

Distinction

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors

(Core) Communication
K15 S11

Describes how they tailor their communication approaches using verbal and written techniques to   meet the needs of different technical and non-technical audiences such as   colleagues, customers and the public, and how they have ensured understanding. (K15, S11)

 

 

 

Explains the possible consequences of using communication approaches which do not meet the needs for different audiences. (K15, S11)

 

 

(Core) Digital and record keeping
K14 S10 S15

Summarises how they process information and communicate using digital technology to maintain and improve business efficiency. (S15)

Describes how they maintain records and outlines their purpose and importance. (K14, S10)

 

 

 

n/a

(Core) Pests and diseases
K13 S9

Explains the techniques they use to identify and control tree pests, diseases and disorders. Explains the impact of pests and diseases on trees, timber and the wider environment, the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and the potential impact of insufficient or poor control. (K13, S9)

 

 

Explains how pests and diseases can spread within and between sites and how to identify future threats. (K13, S9)

(Core) Professional development
B2 B3

Explains how they ensure that they develop their own skills and knowledge, including to meet industry best practice, and the positive impact this has on their team and others. (B2, B3)

 

n/a

(Core) Unwanted vegetation
K7 S5 B4

Outlines how they identify and control unwanted vegetation, including felling small tress in different weather conditions and justifies the chosen techniques and their use of tools with reference to the need to protect wanted vegetation. (K7, S5, B4)

 

 

n/a

(Establishment and maintenance) Protect and maintain trees
K20 K22 S17 S19

Outlines the measures they take to minimise competition by vegetation and protection from threats (for example browsing mammals, weather conditions).  (K20, S17)

Explains how they control vegetation or pests by chemical means using either biocides or organic equivalents in line with legislation.  (K22, S19)

Compares maintenance and protection techniques in line with site conditions and potential threats to the crop

 

(Harvesting) Harvest trees
K23 S20 S21 S22

Explains how they select trees for harvesting in line with the Operational Plan and how to identify them. (S20)

 

 

Describes how they fell trees motor-manually, including assisted fell techniques and use of hand winches in line with FISA (Forest Industry Safety Accord) industry guidance. Explains the application of different harvesting and extraction systems according to site factors and or conditions including impact on costs of bringing to market. (K23, S21, S22)

 

Explains the suitability of systems, techniques and tools in different circumstances and considers how a range of factors could influence decisions relating to selection and harvesting.  (K23, S21, S22)

 

Multiple-choice test

Grade Minimum marks required Maximum marks required
Fail 0 19
Pass 20 24
Distinction 25 30

Overall EPA grading

The EPA methods contribute equally to the overall EPA grade.

Performance in the EPA will determine the apprenticeship grade of:

Independent assessors must individually grade the: practical assessment with questions and professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence according to the requirements set out in this EPA plan.

EPAOs must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

Apprentices who fail one or more assessment method will be awarded an overall EPA fail.

Apprentices must achieve at least a pass in all the EPA methods to get an overall pass. In order to achieve an overall EPA ‘distinction’, apprentices must achieve two distinctions and a pass to achieve distinction.

Grades from individual assessment methods should be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA as a whole.

Practical assessment with questions Multiple-choice test Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass Pass
Pass Pass Distinction Pass
Pass Distinction Distinction Distinction
Distinction Pass Distinction Distinction
Distinction Distinction Pass Distinction
Distinction Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

Apprentices who fail one or more EPA method(s) can take a re-sit or a re-take at the employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

Apprentices should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 2 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 4 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed EPA methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to apprentices wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

An apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of distinction for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements 
  • undertake the EPA  

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA 
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan 
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis 
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:  

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner 
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO) 
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship 
  • understand the occupational standard 
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA 
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan 
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working 
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA  
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading 
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA 
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible 
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer 
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace 
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders 
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes 
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used) 
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually) 
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy 
  • verify the identity of the apprentice  
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan 
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA 
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation 
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan 
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • attend induction training 
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship  
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan  
  • assess the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan  
  • make the grading decisions 
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner 
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures 

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must: 

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard 
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan 
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning 
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA 

Marker

As a minimum, the marker must:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances 
  • mark test answers in line with the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures 

Invigilator

As a minimum, the invigilator must: 

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances 
  • invigilate and supervise apprentices during tests and in breaks during assessment methods to prevent malpractice in accordance with the EPAO’s invigilation procedures 

Designated Point of Contact on site

An additional person required during any practical assessment

As a minimum, the competent person will:

  • be at the assessment venue and be in situ prior to the assessment
  • be briefed prior to assessment by the independent assessor
  • adhere to confidentiality about all aspects of the assessment and the brief they have been provided with
  • not direct any activity and must take instruction from the apprentice
  • not ask questions that indicate how to complete the practical assessment successfully
  • not provide guidance or influence the assessment outcome in any way
  • have no direct connection and no conflict of interest with the apprentice
  • be the designated point of contact for the site if not owned by the EPAO

     

     

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance (IQA)

Internal quality assurance refers to how EPAOs ensure valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. EPAOs must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section and:

  • have effective and rigorous quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery and/or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider. In all instances, including when the EPAO is the training provider (for example a higher education institution)

Professional recognition

Professional body recognition is not relevant to this occupational apprenticeship.

Mapping of KSBs to assessment methods

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1: Core.

Health and safety legislation, codes of practice (including Forest Industry Safety Accord guidance) and policies, including risk assessment.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K2: Core.

Biosecurity and environmental legislation, codes of practice and policies including pollution control.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K3: Core.

Principles of silvicultural practice in the UK including those most commonly used, their application, and the UK Forestry Standard

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K4: Core.

Methods to identify trees and woodland plants including botanical keys taking account of seasonality.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K5: Core.

Plant and tree biology, physiology, lifecycles, growing conditions, landscape and timber properties.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K6: Core.

Techniques for measuring standing trees

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K7: Core.

Techniques for felling small trees and removing unwanted vegetation.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K8: Core.

Techniques for planting, supporting and protecting trees and their suitability to different situations including site conditions.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K9: Core.

Implications of tree establishment activities on the end product and impact on decision-making process.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K10: Core.

Timber supply chain (for example timber markets and processing) and the actors within it including roles and responsibilities.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K11: Core.

Maintenance requirements for forest infrastructure, for example boundaries and rides.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K12: Core.

Maintenance, operational requirements and legislation for tools, equipment, machinery, vehicles and attachments. 

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K13: Core.

Techniques for identification and control of tree pests, diseases and disorders, including impacts of pests and diseases on timber and the wider environment, and the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K14: Core.

The importance of maintaining records including digital records and reports

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K15: Core.

Techniques for communicating with technical and non-technical audiences and the importance of effective communication in the workplace with colleagues, customers and the public.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K16: Core.

Implications of changes in conditions, situations and working environments.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K17: Core.

The importance of recording a portfolio of experience and learning to aid career progression.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K18: Establishment and maintenance.

The environmental, social and economic value of sustainable forest management.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K19: Core.

Methods for storing, transporting and handling trees and importance for tree health and establishment.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K20: Core.

(Establishment & maintenance) Techniques for protecting and maintaining plants after planting including purpose, timings and suitability to site conditions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K21: Core.

(Establishment & maintenance) Methods of managing and controlling unwanted vegetation throughout the life cycle of the tree(s).

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K22: Core.

(Establishment & maintenance) Methods for controlling vegetation or pests by chemical means (for example pesticides or organic equivalents).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K23: Core.

(Harvesting) Harvesting and extraction systems including tree felling and the factors affecting the cost of bringing timber to market.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K24: Harvesting.

(Harvesting) Techniques for calculating timber in standing and felled trees

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
Skill Assessment methods
S1: Core.

Plan, implement, monitor and review health, safety and welfare of self and others, including creating risk assessments, legislative requirements and organisational policies.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S2: Core.

Plan, implement, check and report environmental mitigation measures, including legal compliance, organisational policies and risk assessment.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S3: Core.

Identify common forestry trees and woodland plants using scientific names.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
S4: Core.

Measure trees for assessment of timber volumes.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S5: Core.

Identify and control unwanted vegetation including felling small trees using hand and motor manual tools.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S6: Core.

Plant trees including providing support and protection.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S7: Core.

Monitor and maintain forest and woodland infrastructure for example boundaries and rides.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S8: Core.

Operate and maintain tools, equipment and machinery safely in line with legislation and manufacturers guidance, for example winches, chainsaws or tractors.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S9: Core.

Monitor and control the impact of pests, diseases and disorders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S10: Core.

Maintain records including digital records and reports.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S11: Core.

Communicate to technical and non-technical audiences including the use of verbal and written techniques.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12: Core.

Interpret maps, plans and Global Positioning Systems (GPS).

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S13: Core.

Store and dispose of waste in accordance with regulations, for example chemicals, organic and inorganic waste, pollution and biosecurity controls.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S14: Core.

Load, unload and transport materials and equipment relative to the business

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S15: Core.

Process information and communicate using digital technology for example emails, word processing software, video meeting software or applications for recording and sharing information.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S16: Core.

Store and handle trees to minimise negative impacts and maximise establishment potential.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S17: Core.

(Establishment & maintenance) Protect and maintain plants after planting including weeding, cleaning, re-spacing, beating up and application of products to prevent unwanted vegetation (for example mulch mat).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S18: Core.

(Establishment & maintenance) Improve quality of tree crop, including brashing and formative pruning.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S19: Core.

(Establishment & maintenance) Control vegetation or pests by chemical means (biocides or organic equivalents).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S20: Harvesting.

(Harvesting) Select trees for harvesting.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S21: Core.

(Harvesting) Fell large trees motor-manually including use of assisted fell techniques.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S22: Core.

(Harvesting) Use hand winches in forestry.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S23: Core.

(Harvesting) Prepare timber for extraction including snedding, measuring, cross cutting and sorting timber to product specification.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S24: Harvesting.

(Harvesting) Calculate timber volumes using mensuration techniques.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1: Core.

Takes ownership of work including attention to detail, spatial awareness and stamina.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
B2: Core.

Team-focused and works effectively with colleagues and others

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3: Core.

Committed to keeping up to date with industry best practice and seeks to continuously improve and develop.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B4: Core.

Ability to work outdoors in all weather conditions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B5: Core.

Puts safety first for themselves and others

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
B6: Core.

Respectful of others and tailors communication to audience.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Practical assessment with questions - PracticalAssessment

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Environment

S2 S13

N/A

Plan, implement, check and report environmental mitigation measures, including legal compliance, organisational policies and risk assessment. (S2)

Store and dispose of waste in accordance with regulations, for example chemicals, organic and inorganic waste, pollution and biosecurity controls. (S13)

N/A

(Core) Forest infrastructure
K11
S7
B1

Maintenance requirements for forest infrastructure, for example boundaries and rides. (K11)

Monitor and maintain forest and woodland infrastructure for example boundaries and rides. (S7)

Takes ownership of work including attention to detail, spatial awareness and stamina. (B1)

(Core) Health, safety and welfare
K16
S1
B5 B6

Implications of changes in conditions, situations and working environments. (K16)

Plan, implement, monitor and review health, safety and welfare of self and others, including creating risk assessments, legislative requirements and organisational policies. (S1)

Puts safety first for themselves and others (B5)

Respectful of others and tailors communication to audience. (B6)

(Core) Maps and plans

S12

N/A

Interpret maps, plans and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). (S12)

N/A

(Core) Measuring
K6
S4

Techniques for measuring standing trees (K6)

Measure trees for assessment of timber volumes. (S4)

N/A

(Core) Planting
K8 K19
S6 S16

Techniques for planting, supporting and protecting trees and their suitability to different situations including site conditions. (K8)

Methods for storing, transporting and handling trees and importance for tree health and establishment. (K19)

Plant trees including providing support and protection. (S6)

Store and handle trees to minimise negative impacts and maximise establishment potential. (S16)

N/A

(Core) Transport materials

S14

N/A

Load, unload and transport materials and equipment relative to the business (S14)

N/A

(Core) Tools, equipment and machinery
K12
S8

Maintenance, operational requirements and legislation for tools, equipment, machinery, vehicles and attachments.  (K12)

Operate and maintain tools, equipment and machinery safely in line with legislation and manufacturers guidance, for example winches, chainsaws or tractors. (S8)

N/A

(Establishment and maintenance) Improve tree crop
K21
S18

(Establishment & maintenance) Methods of managing and controlling unwanted vegetation throughout the life cycle of the tree(s). (K21)

(Establishment & maintenance) Improve quality of tree crop, including brashing and formative pruning. (S18)

N/A

(Harvesting) Mensuration
K24
S24

(Harvesting) Techniques for calculating timber in standing and felled trees (K24)

(Harvesting) Calculate timber volumes using mensuration techniques. (S24)

N/A

(Harvesting) Timber processing

S23

N/A

(Harvesting) Prepare timber for extraction including snedding, measuring, cross cutting and sorting timber to product specification. (S23)

N/A

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence - Discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
(Core) Communication
K15
S11

Techniques for communicating with technical and non-technical audiences and the importance of effective communication in the workplace with colleagues, customers and the public. (K15)

Communicate to technical and non-technical audiences including the use of verbal and written techniques. (S11)

N/A

(Core) Digital and record keeping
K14
S10 S15

The importance of maintaining records including digital records and reports (K14)

Maintain records including digital records and reports. (S10)

Process information and communicate using digital technology for example emails, word processing software, video meeting software or applications for recording and sharing information. (S15)

N/A

(Core) Pests and diseases
K13
S9

Techniques for identification and control of tree pests, diseases and disorders, including impacts of pests and diseases on timber and the wider environment, and the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM). (K13)

Monitor and control the impact of pests, diseases and disorders. (S9)

N/A

(Core) Professional development


B2 B3

N/A

N/A

Team-focused and works effectively with colleagues and others (B2)

Committed to keeping up to date with industry best practice and seeks to continuously improve and develop. (B3)

(Core) Unwanted vegetation
K7
S5
B4

Techniques for felling small trees and removing unwanted vegetation. (K7)

Identify and control unwanted vegetation including felling small trees using hand and motor manual tools. (S5)

Ability to work outdoors in all weather conditions. (B4)

(Establishment and maintenance) Protect and maintain trees
K20 K22
S17 S19

(Establishment & maintenance) Techniques for protecting and maintaining plants after planting including purpose, timings and suitability to site conditions. (K20)

(Establishment & maintenance) Methods for controlling vegetation or pests by chemical means (for example pesticides or organic equivalents). (K22)

(Establishment & maintenance) Protect and maintain plants after planting including weeding, cleaning, re-spacing, beating up and application of products to prevent unwanted vegetation (for example mulch mat). (S17)

(Establishment & maintenance) Control vegetation or pests by chemical means (biocides or organic equivalents). (S19)

N/A

(Harvesting) Harvest trees
K23
S20 S21 S22

(Harvesting) Harvesting and extraction systems including tree felling and the factors affecting the cost of bringing timber to market. (K23)

(Harvesting) Select trees for harvesting. (S20)

(Harvesting) Fell large trees motor-manually including use of assisted fell techniques. (S21)

(Harvesting) Use hand winches in forestry. (S22)

N/A

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Employers involved in creating the standard: Ground Control Goetre Villa Adrow Barcham - The Tree Specialists Bartlett Tree Experts Beachwood Trees and Landscape Ltd Camps Environmental Services Ltd Cormac Solutions Ltd Jenks Oxford Ltd Lockhart Garratt London Borough of Barnet London Borough of Bexley London Borough of Lambeth Quaife Woodlands Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Savills Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks Sedgemoor Tree Services Sharon Hosegood Associates The Tree Company Tim Moya Associates Tree Maintenance Ltd Treetech Arboricultural Services Ltd Woodland Trust Chatsworth House Trust CRC Ecology English Heritage Euroforest Forest Services Forestry England London Borough of Waltham Forest M&S Woodland Services Martin Glynn FICFOR National Trust Nurture Landscapes Royal Horticultural Society Say it with wood Wildways

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.0 Approved for delivery 18/08/2022 Not set Not set

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