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Food and drink maintenance engineer

Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0195
  3. Version: 1.1
  4. Level: 3
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 42 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Maximum funding: £26000
  8. Route: Engineering and manufacturing
  9. Date updated: 05/05/2022
  10. Approved for delivery: 9 December 2014
  11. Lars code: 16
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual
  13. Example progression routes:
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Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

Maintaining machinery and equipment in the food and drinks industry, finding and resolving faults, to optimise production levels.

Occupation summary

Rate and provide feedback for this webpage template here

This occupation is found in the engineering function in the food and drink manufacturing sector. The sector uses highly automated equipment and technology to produce a wide range of food and drink products for consumers. 

Food and drink manufacturers range in size from small to large. Technicians may work directly for a food and drink company or a contractor.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to maintain food and drink machinery and equipment to optimise production levels. They conduct planned and predicative maintenance to prevent issues occurring and also reactive maintenance for example, to respond to breakdowns. They lead or support food and drink operational teams with machinery change overs and set ups. Contributing to the installation and decommissioning of food and drink equipment and machinery is also part of the role. Working with other teams, they contribute to technical performance reviews and continuous improvement activities. They may need to contribute to food and drink audits.   

They may complete work as part of a team or alone, depending on the task. 

In their daily work, food and drink maintenance technicians interact with other technicians and engineers. They also interact with operational and site teams. This may include quality, and research and development. They may also have contact with auditors, regulators, and customers undertaking site visits.

They typically report to an engineering lead. They work with minimal supervision. 

An employee in this occupation is responsible for using engineering practices that ensure food safety in line with food safety legislation. Keeping machinery and equipment available to meet production needs and outputs is key. They must comply with food safety, health and safety, environmental, sustainability, and engineering regulations and standards. They also must also take account of business operation considerations such as cost and service level agreements.

They are likely to be required to work a range of shifts, including unsociable hours.

Typical job titles include:

Food and drink maintenance engineer Food and drink multi-skilled engineer

Duties

  • Duty 1 Prepare for food and drink maintenance work.
  • Duty 2 Conduct planned maintenance of food and drink processing and packaging equipment.
  • Duty 3 Conduct predictive maintenance of food and drink processing and packaging equipment (condition based monitoring).
  • Duty 4 Respond to breakdowns of food and drink processing and packaging equipment. Conduct reactive maintenance or corrective actions to resolve deviation.
  • Duty 5 Identify faults (electrical, mechanical, instrumentation, automation and pneumatics) on food and drink processing and packaging equipment and action required.
  • Duty 6 Lead or support food and drink operational teams with machinery change overs and set ups.
  • Duty 7 Manufacture and repair component parts for food and drink processing and packaging equipment.
  • Duty 8 Contribute to continuous improvement projects to optimise food and drink equipment or process. For example, participate in failure investigations to ensure process effectiveness and to contribute to and implement practical engineering solutions for efficiency and profitability.
  • Duty 9 Remove and decommission food and drink processing and packaging equipment.
  • Duty 10 Contribute to the installation and commission food and drink processing and packaging equipment in line with food science and safety principles.
  • Duty 11 Contribute to technical performance reviews in collaboration with other functions and stakeholders.
  • Duty 12 Maintain engineering documentation for food and drink maintenance work.
  • Duty 13 Support maintenance and operational team members in developing engineering technical competence.
  • Duty 14 Ensure availability and performance of maintenance tools and equipment.
  • Duty 15 Contribute to food and drink internal and external audits.

Apprenticeship summary

ST0195, food and drink maintenance engineer level 3


This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA. 

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically42 months. The EPA period is typically3 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

When you pass the EPA, you will be awarded your apprenticeship certificate.

EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. The portfolio of evidence will typically contain 10 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence should be mapped against the KSBs.

Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested. Evidence sources may include:

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the interview. Independent assessors should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the interview. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

passed any other qualifications listed in the occupational standard. For the food and drink maintenance engineer,
the qualification required is:   Diploma in food and drink engineering maintenance



Assessment methods


Observation with questions
You will be observed by an independent assessor completing your work. It will last at least 4 hours. They will ask you at least 5 questions.

You will have 0 to complete the project. The independent assessor will review the artefact on site prior to meeting with you.





interview

You will have a professional interview with an independent assessor. It will last 90 minutes. They will ask you at least 12 questions.The questions will be about certain aspects of your occupation. You can use it to help answer the questions.

You will have 0 to complete the project. The independent assessor will review the artefact on site prior to meeting with you.




Test or examination
You will complete a test requiring long written answers. It will be closed book , meaning you will not have access to any books or reference materials.
 The test will have


The test will have 15 long response written questions. You will have 120 minutes to complete it.

You will have 0 to complete the project. The independent assessor will review the artefact on site prior to meeting with you.



Test or examination

You will complete a multiple-choice test. It will be closed book , meaning you will not have access to any books or reference materials.

The test will have 40 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes to complete it.


You will have 0 to complete the project. The independent assessor will review the artefact on site prior to meeting with you.




Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.


Reasonable adjustments


If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.


Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with The Institution of Engineering and Technology for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level..

Please contact the professional body for more details.

This apprenticeship aligns with The Institution of Mechanical Engineers for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level..

Please contact the professional body for more details.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

Rate and provide feedback for this webpage template here

This occupation is found in the engineering function in the food and drink manufacturing sector. The sector uses highly automated equipment and technology to produce a wide range of food and drink products for consumers. 

Food and drink manufacturers range in size from small to large. Technicians may work directly for a food and drink company or a contractor.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to maintain food and drink machinery and equipment to optimise production levels. They conduct planned and predicative maintenance to prevent issues occurring and also reactive maintenance for example, to respond to breakdowns. They lead or support food and drink operational teams with machinery change overs and set ups. Contributing to the installation and decommissioning of food and drink equipment and machinery is also part of the role. Working with other teams, they contribute to technical performance reviews and continuous improvement activities. They may need to contribute to food and drink audits.   

They may complete work as part of a team or alone, depending on the task. 

In their daily work, food and drink maintenance technicians interact with other technicians and engineers. They also interact with operational and site teams. This may include quality, and research and development. They may also have contact with auditors, regulators, and customers undertaking site visits.

They typically report to an engineering lead. They work with minimal supervision. 

An employee in this occupation is responsible for using engineering practices that ensure food safety in line with food safety legislation. Keeping machinery and equipment available to meet production needs and outputs is key. They must comply with food safety, health and safety, environmental, sustainability, and engineering regulations and standards. They also must also take account of business operation considerations such as cost and service level agreements.

They are likely to be required to work a range of shifts, including unsociable hours.

Typical job titles include:

Food and drink maintenance engineer Food and drink multi-skilled engineer

Entry requirements

Typically, 5 GCSEs including English grade 4 (C) and mathematics grade 6 (B), or equivalent. 

 

Occupation duties

Duty

KSBs

Duty 1 Prepare for food and drink maintenance work.

K1 K2 K8 K9 K11 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K42 K44 K45 K47

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S9 S26 S28 S29

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7

Duty 2 Conduct planned maintenance of food and drink processing and packaging equipment.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21 K22 K24 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S13 S17 S24

B1 B2 B3 B4 B7

Duty 3 Conduct predictive maintenance of food and drink processing and packaging equipment (condition based monitoring).

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21 K22 K24 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S17 S24

B1 B2 B3 B4 B7

Duty 4 Respond to breakdowns of food and drink processing and packaging equipment. Conduct reactive maintenance or corrective actions to resolve deviation.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38 K39 K40 K45

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S17 S19 S20 S22 S24 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 5 Identify faults (electrical, mechanical, instrumentation, automation and pneumatics) on food and drink processing and packaging equipment and action required.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38 K39 K40

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S17 S20 S22 S24 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 6 Lead or support food and drink operational teams with machinery change overs and set ups.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K22 K24 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38 K44 K45 K47 K48 K49

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S24 S28 S30

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7

Duty 7 Manufacture and repair component parts for food and drink processing and packaging equipment.

K2 K8 K9 K11 K12 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K22 K25 K26

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S18 S19 S21 S24

B1 B2 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 8 Contribute to continuous improvement projects to optimise food and drink equipment or process. For example, participate in failure investigations to ensure process effectiveness and to contribute to and implement practical engineering solutions for efficiency and profitability.

K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K8 K9 K11 K12 K13 K15 K18 K19 K20 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38 K39 K40 K41 K45 K47 K48 K49

S1 S4 S5 S6 S17 S20 S21 S22 S23 S26 S28 S29 S30

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B7

Duty 9 Remove and decommission food and drink processing and packaging equipment.

K1 K2 K6 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K24 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S16 S24

B1 B2 B3 B4 B7

Duty 10 Contribute to the installation and commission food and drink processing and packaging equipment in line with food science and safety principles.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K18 K19 K22 K24 K25 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S13 S14 S15 S19 S24

B1 B2 B3 B4 B7

Duty 11 Contribute to technical performance reviews in collaboration with other functions and stakeholders.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K7 K8 K9 K11 K12 K13 K15 K17 K18 K19 K21 K23 K24 K26 K27 K28 K29 K30 K31 K32 K33 K34 K35 K36 K37 K38 K39 K40 K41 K45 K46 K47 K48 K49

S1 S4 S5 S6 S17 S20 S22 S26 S28 S29 S30

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B7

Duty 12 Maintain engineering documentation for food and drink maintenance work.

K1 K2 K3 K8 K9 K11 K16 K42 K43 K45 K46

S3 S4 S5 S6 S8 S21 S25 S26 S27 S29

B1 B2 B3 B4 B7

Duty 13 Support maintenance and operational team members in developing engineering technical competence.

K2 K8 K9 K11 K45 K48 K49

S4 S5 S6 S26 S28 S30

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B7

Duty 14 Ensure availability and performance of maintenance tools and equipment.

K2 K8 K9 K11 K14 K16 K44

S1 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8

B1 B2 B3 B4 B7

Duty 15 Contribute to food and drink internal and external audits.

K1 K2 K3 K8 K9 K11 K45 K46

S1 S4 S5 S6 S26 S28 S29

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Food and drink sector awareness. The industry's regulator: The Food Standards Agency. Types of organisations: branded and non-branded, and high and low care sites. Types of food and drink products: ambient, frozen, fresh, chilled, confectionery, and liquid. End-to-end supply chain. Customers and consumers. Customer specifications: purpose and consequences of non-compliance. Implications of product shelf life. Back to Duty

K2: Food and drink maintenance engineer's role. Limits of autonomy. Different teams and functions involved in production. Business operation considerations: efficiency, customer satisfaction, competitiveness, minimising risks to production, and ethical practices. Back to Duty

K3: Principles of quality management systems and processes in the food and drink industry and impact on customer requirements. Customer and food trade association standards for example, British Retail Consortium, Retailer standards. Internal and external audits and impact on maintenance. Back to Duty

K4: Food science and technology - fundamentals of how engineering is used in food and drink production: aseptic filling and processing, chilling, freezing, heat processing, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), preservation, and packaging. Back to Duty

K5: Food safety regulations awareness and their impact on food and drink engineering: Food Safety Act, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), Threat Analysis of Critical Control Points (TACCP), and Vulnerability Assessment of Critical Control Points (VACCP). Back to Duty

K6: Food safety: control of contamination hazards (microbiological, physical, and chemical). The risk of contamination and impact on product integrity and health of consumers. Allergens. The importance and impact of temperature and process control measures. Regulatory information and date code responsibilities. Hygienic engineering design of food premises and equipment, and hygiene requirements of operators. Cleaning and disinfection principles, procedures, and methods: Cleaning in place (CIP), cleaning out of place, and chemical impact. Pest control. Back to Duty

K7: Properties of food and drink, packaging materials and sealing techniques and impact on engineering tasks. Back to Duty

K8: Health and safety regulations awareness and their application to food and drink engineering: Health and Safety at Work Act, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (CoSHH), Working in confined spaces, Working at Height, Lone working, Provision of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER), Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres (DSEAR), Pressure Equipment Directive (PED), Electricity at work regulations, Noise regulation, L8 Legionella, Display Screen Equipment, The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR), and Construction Design Management regulations. Slips trips and falls. Types of incidents: fire, accidents, and near-misses. Mitigation methods. Incident management. Near miss reporting. Back to Duty

K9: Health and safety practice: risk assessments and method statements, manual handling, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and signage and barriers. Back to Duty

K10: Safe isolation of process fluids, gases, electricity, and stored energy: Lockout, tagout (LOTO). Back to Duty

K11: Environmental regulations and requirements awareness and their application to food and drink engineering. Environmental Protection Act. Sustainability. Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE). Hazardous waste regulations. Waste management. Recyclable materials and waste disposal procedures. Energy monitoring. Data logging to optimise energy performance. The Climate Change Agreements. Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC). Renewable and alternative energy sources. Energy reduction. Types of pollution and control measures: noise, smells, spills, and waste. Efficient use of resources. Environmental permits. Back to Duty

K12: Types of food and drink equipment and their application: pumps, valves, gauges, temperature controls, mixers, conveyors, depositors, sealers, safety systems, pressure systems and transmitters, human machine interface, and handheld devices. The importance of set points. Back to Duty

K13: Spares and services considerations: availability, stock lead times, correct handling, the identification of equipment and parts, function and specification of parts, spares, and components, stock value, faulty stock, returns, salvageability of parts to be removed. Back to Duty

K14: Maintenance tools: selection, correct use, maintenance, storage requirements. Restrictions in food and drink industry and designated areas. Back to Duty

K15: Engineering standards and regulations awareness and their application to food and drink engineering: British Standards (BS), International Organisation for Standardisation standards (ISO), European Norm (EN), and Atmospheres and Explosives (ATEX). Manufacturers’ manuals: what they are and how to use them. Back to Duty

K16: Standard operating and quality assurance procedures (SOP): what they are and how to use them. Back to Duty

K17: British standards for engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. Back to Duty

K18: Engineering mathematical and scientific principles: calculations, conversions, and equipment sizing and dimensions. Back to Duty

K19: Engineering materials and their properties: impact on use in a food environment (food safe). Back to Duty

K20: Maintenance strategies and best practice: run to failure (breakdown maintenance), preventive (scheduled) maintenance, Predictive Maintenance (PdM), and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). Back to Duty

K21: Reliability techniques - critical tools: condition monitoring, oil sampling, thermography, vibration analysis, and ultrasound. How they are used to reduce breakdowns, failures, and operational losses. Back to Duty

K22: Food safety engineering: food grade oils, greases, cleaning fluids, and safe use of tools and equipment. Back to Duty

K23: Equipment performance measures: data and how to use it. Terminology: mean time between failure, and overall equipment effectiveness (availability). Back to Duty

K24: Mechanical principles. Types of mechanical drives, belts, chains, and gears: alignment, and how to identify wear. Types of bearings: application, alignment, and fit. Back to Duty

K25: Principles of down-hand (flat) TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding techniques in food environment: butt and tee. Awareness of MMA (Manual Metal Arc) and MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding practices and when they need to be used. Back to Duty

K26: Component manufacturing uses and requirements. Turning and milling, grinding, drilling, bench fitting techniques. Preparation for the food and drink environment. Threads, fit, finish, joining techniques, measurement and tolerance, and material selection considerations. Back to Duty

K27: Pneumatic and hydraulic system principles: transfer of energy inside fluid power systems in the food and drink industry. Back to Duty

K28: Basic engineering theory and thermodynamic principles on heat transfer used in the food and drink industry: how it works and maintenance requirements. Back to Duty

K29: Electrical principles. Basic electrical theory: LV (Low Voltage), HV (High Voltage), current, resistance, symbols and terminology. Electrical first aid. Alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) systems. Testing equipment. Electrical circuit theory, electrical machines, electrical safety systems, and smart solutions. Back to Duty

K30: Control circuits principles. Basic components (switches, relays, contactors, overloads, circuit breakers), power supplies, and calibration. Back to Duty

K31: Safety circuits: safety system categories, safety system architecture and components, characteristics of safety system components. What they do and why they are important (legality and performance). Back to Duty

K32: Types of motors and control systems and how they work: mechanical and electrical properties, programming of variable speed drives and parameters, soft starts. Back to Duty

K33: Electrical instrumentation and control installation, commissioning and decommissioning practices and techniques to standards required for food and drink industry. Ingress Protection (IP) and ATEX ratings. Testing and fault finding approved instrument requirements. Arc flash protection requirements. Back to Duty

K34: Automation. Instrumentation and calibration techniques for systems: thermo, weights, and flow. Robotics and data acquisition (SCADA) and smart network systems. Communication systems: Profinet, Ethernet, Profibus, CANopen, and DeviceNet. Back to Duty

K35: Types of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). How they work, system maintenance and architecture. Digital, analogue inputs, outputs, and IOT. Hardware interface and field wiring. Back to Duty

K36: Sensors and motion control. Types of sensors and how they work: digital, analogue, pressure level, probes, inductive and smart. Encoders and position control: selection procedures. Back to Duty

K37: Awareness of services and utilities in the context of food safety importance and impact: water supply and systems, boiler control, electrical distribution system, air compressors, steam boilers, refrigeration system, building management, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) controls, access control systems, effluent and waste, and chilled water systems. Back to Duty

K38: Principles of factory digitalisation (Industry 4.0). Back to Duty

K39: Problem solving techniques: root cause analysis, 6 thinking hats, DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control), and PDCA (Plan Do Check Act). Back to Duty

K40: Fault finding techniques: root cause analysis, 5 Whys, fishbone, and half-split. Diagnostic tools and equipment. Back to Duty

K41: Continuous improvement techniques: lean, 6-sigma, KAIZEN, 5S (Sort, set, shine, standardise and sustain), and SMED (Single-Minute Exchange of Dies). Back to Duty

K42: Information technology: Management Information Systems (MIS), spreadsheets, presentation, word processing, email, virtual communication and learning platforms. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Cyber security requirements. Back to Duty

K43: Maintenance work recording and documentation requirements. Back to Duty

K44: Organisation techniques: planning, time management, workflow, and work scheduling and prioritisation. Back to Duty

K45: Communication techniques: verbal, written, and electronic. Adapting style to audience. Engineering terminology. Back to Duty

K46: Report writing techniques. Back to Duty

K47: Team working techniques: how to work as part of a team, understanding the importance of establishing and meeting the requirements of different roles. Back to Duty

K48: Workplace training and buddying techniques: how to pass on knowledge and skills to others. Back to Duty

K49: Equality, diversity, and inclusion in the workplace: what it means and why it is important. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Read and interpret task related information and data. For example, work instructions, SOPs, quality control documentation, Service Level Agreements, specifications, engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information, work instructions, and operation manuals. Back to Duty

S2: Plan work. Identify and organise resources to complete tasks. Back to Duty

S3: Identify hazards and control measures to mitigate risks. Back to Duty

S4: Comply with food safety regulations and procedures. Back to Duty

S5: Comply with health and safety regulations and procedures. Back to Duty

S6: Comply with environment and sustainability regulations and procedures: safe disposal of waste, re-cycling or re-use of materials and efficient use of resources. Back to Duty

S7: Select, check the condition, and safely use maintenance tools and equipment. Store tools and equipment. Complete or arrange maintenance of tools and equipment including calibration where required. Back to Duty

S8: Follow standard operating procedures and quality procedures. Back to Duty

S9: Follow site isolation and lock off procedures (lockout, tagout) and re-instatement of equipment with system checks and handover. Back to Duty

S10: Apply mechanical and fluid power system maintenance practices and techniques. For example, check levels, parts wear, pressure, and sensors, grease and lubricate parts, replace, fit components, and calibrate equipment. Back to Duty

S11: Apply electrical and control maintenance practices and techniques including use of electrical testing equipment and instruments. For example, panel risk assessment, fixed wire installation testing, fault finding, thermographic surveys, and checking protection settings. Back to Duty

S12: Apply reliability engineering techniques to prevent or reduce the likelihood or frequency of failures. For example, condition monitoring, oil sampling, thermography, vibration analysis, and ultrasound. Back to Duty

S13: Install and configure instrumentation or process control systems. Back to Duty

S14: Install and configure electrical systems. For example, add distribution boards to circuits, single and three phase motors (AC and DC). Back to Duty

S15: Assemble, position and fix equipment or components. Complete commissioning checks. Back to Duty

S16: Disconnect and remove equipment or components. Complete storage measures to prevent deterioration. Back to Duty

S17: Read and interpret equipment performance data. Back to Duty

S18: Fabricate, drill, and join to produce basic parts, spares or components to measurement and tolerance specification. Back to Duty

S19: Apply down-hand (flat) TIG welding techniques: butt and tee. Back to Duty

S20: Apply mathematical techniques to solve engineering problems. Back to Duty

S21: Produce and amend electrical and mechanical engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. For example, for new component parts or change in circuit diagram or panel. Back to Duty

S22: Apply fault-finding and problem-solving techniques for example, using PLC data to diagnose issues and locate faults on industrial network. Back to Duty

S23: Apply continuous improvement techniques to understand current performance; collect and record data. Devise suggestions for improvement. Back to Duty

S24: Restore the work area on completion of activity. Back to Duty

S25: Resolve or escalate issues. Back to Duty

S26: Use information technology. For example, for document creation, communication, and information management. Comply with GDPR. Comply with cyber security. Back to Duty

S27: Record work activity. For example, asset management records, work sheets, checklists, waste environmental records, and any business or legal reporting requirements. Back to Duty

S28: Communicate verbal and written. For example, with colleagues and stakeholders. Use engineering terminology where appropriate. Back to Duty

S29: Produce reports for example, equipment performance reports. Back to Duty

S30: Provide guidance or training to colleagues or stakeholders. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Prioritise health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability. Back to Duty

B2: Promote health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability. Back to Duty

B3: Take ownership for own work and accountability for quality of work. Back to Duty

B4: Apply a professional approach. Back to Duty

B5: Team-focus to meet work goals: respectful to others, builds relationship with others, and positive inclusion. Back to Duty

B6: Respond and adapt to work demands. Back to Duty

B7: Committed to Continued Professional Development (CPD) to maintain and enhance their competence. Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Other mandatory qualifications

Diploma in food and drink engineering maintenance

Level: 3

Ofqual regulated

Professional recognition

This standard aligns with the following professional recognition:

  • The Institution of Engineering and Technology for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.
  • The Institution of Mechanical Engineers for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.
Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

AP05

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the food and drink maintenance engineer apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering their EPA.

Food and drink maintenance engineer apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 42 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a food and drink maintenance engineer. The apprentice must spend at least 12 months on-programme. The apprentice must spend at least 20% of their on-programme time completing off-the-job training.

This EPA has 4 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - observation with questions:

Assessment method 2 - interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

Assessment method 3 - written test:

Assessment method 4 - multiple-choice test:

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

EPA summary table

On-programme (typically 42 months)

The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the food and drink maintenance engineer occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications at Level 21, if required.

The apprentice must complete training towards the qualification listed in the food and drink maintenance engineer occupational standard.

The qualification required is a:

Diploma in food and drink engineering maintenance Level 3

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence.

End-point assessment gateway

The apprentice's employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the food and drink maintenance engineer occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the food and drink maintenance engineer occupational standard
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have passed the qualification listed in the food and drink maintenance engineer occupational standard ST0195.

The qualification required is a:

Diploma in food and drink engineering maintenance Level 3

The apprentice must have achieved English and mathematics at Level 21.

For the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to the EPAO.

End-point assessment (typically 3 months)

Grades available for each assessment method:

Observation with questions

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Written test

  • fail
  • pass

Multiple-choice test

  • fail
  • pass

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship aligns with The Institution of Engineering and Technology for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

This apprenticeship aligns with The Institution of Mechanical Engineers for Engineering Technician (EngTech). The experience gained and responsibility held by the apprentice on completion of the apprenticeship will either wholly or partially satisfy the requirements for registration at this level.

Re-sits and re-takes



  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: pass
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically, 2 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically, 4 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 3 months.

The expectation is that the EPAO will confirm the gateway requirements have been met and the EPA starts as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice is working at or above the food and drink maintenance engineer occupational standard. The apprentice then enters the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but they must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and mathematics at Level 21
  • achieved a diploma in food and drink engineering maintenance at level 3

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. The portfolio of evidence will typically contain 10 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence should be mapped against the KSBs.

Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested. Evidence sources may include:

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the interview. Independent assessors should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the interview. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

The apprentice must submit the gateway evidence to the EPAO.

The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms all gateway requirements have been met. The expectation is they will do this as quickly as possible.

Assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Observation with questions

Overview

In the observation with questions, an independent assessor observes the apprentice in their workplace and asks questions. The apprentice completes their day-to-day duties under normal working conditions. This allows the apprentice to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method through naturally occurring evidence. Simulation is not permitted during the observation.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

Delivery

The observation with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the observation with questions.

The independent assessor must only observe one apprentice at a time to ensure quality and rigour and they must be as unobtrusive as possible.

The EPAO must give the apprentice 2 weeks' notice of the observation with questions. 

The observation with questions must take 4 hours.

The independent assessor can increase the time of the observation with questions by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete a task or respond to a question if necessary.

The observation with questions may be split into discrete sections held on the same working day.

The EPAO must manage invigilation of the apprentice during the assessment, to maintain security of the EPA, in line with their malpractice policy. This includes breaks and moving between locations. 

The independent assessor must explain to the apprentice the format and timescales of the observation with questions before it starts. This does not count towards the assessment time.

The independent assessor should observe the following during the observation:

Activities may be conducted in relation to food and drink processing or packaging equipment.

Activities should cover mechanical, electrical, and fluid power equipment.

These activities provide the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Questioning can occur both during and after the observation and the time for questioning is included in the overall assessment time. The independent assessor must ask at least 5  questions. To remain as unobtrusive as possible, the independent assessor should ask questions during natural stops between tasks and after completion of work rather than disrupting the apprentice’s flow. Follow-up questions are allowed. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must ask questions about KSBs that were not observed to gather assessment evidence. These questions are in addition to the set number of questions (as above) for the observation and should be kept to a minimum. The independent assessor can also ask questions to clarify answers given by the apprentice.

The independent assessor must record the KSBs observed, KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions and the grade achieved. The apprentice’s answers to questions must also be recorded.

The independent assessor must make the grading decisions. The observation and responses to questions must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade.

Assessment location

The observation with questions must take place in the apprentice’s normal place of work (for example, their employer’s premises or a customer’s premises). Equipment and resources needed for the observation must be provided by the employer and be in good working condition.   

Questioning that occurs after the observation should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write an assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of the EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The EPAO must develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the observation with questions:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, an independent assessor asks the apprentice questions. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

Delivery

The interview must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the interview.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions is to assess the following themes:

Assessment of the above themes must be in relation to food and drink maintenance engineering.

The EPAO must give the apprentice 2 weeks' notice of the interview.

The independent assessor must have at least 2 weeks to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the interview.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however, it is not directly assessed.

The interview must last for 90 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the interview by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 12 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor must record the KSBs met, the grade achieved and answers to questions.

The independent assessor must make the grading decisions.

Assessment location

The interview must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The interview can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The interview should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write an assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of the EPA materials when consulting employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO will develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Written test

Overview

A written test is an assessment for asking questions in a controlled and invigilated environment. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge and skills mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

Delivery

The written test must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge and skills mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The written test can be computer or paper based.

The written test must consist of 15 long response written questions. Long response written questions need a written response of typically 1-2 paragraphs, around 100 words.

The written test must have one question for each theme - see mapping of KSBs to themes. A question must be awarded between 4-6 marks. A test paper must have 75 marks. Each question should clearly state the marks available. Papers must have a pass mark of 52 marks. Question papers must be of equal challenge.

Individual marks can be awarded for partial responses. Half marks are not permitted. Where there is insufficient evidence to award any marks in a response, a zero mark must be given. Marks must be awarded in line with the EPAOs mark scheme. The grading descriptors must inform the mark scheme.

The apprentice must be given at least 2 weeks' notice of the date and time of the written test.

Test administration

The apprentice must have 120 minutes to complete the test.

The written test is closed book which means that the apprentice cannot refer to reference books or materials whilst taking the test.

The following equipment is allowed to be used during the written test:

The written test must be taken in the presence of an invigilator who is the responsibility of the EPAO. Specialised (proctor) software can be used if the test can be taken on-line, to ensure the security of the test.

The EPAO must have an invigilation policy setting out how the written test must be conducted. It must state the ratio of apprentices to invigilators for the setting and allow the test to take place in a secure way.

The EPAO must verify the identity of the apprentice.

The EPAO is responsible for the security of the written test including the arrangements for on-line testing. The EPAO must ensure that their security arrangements maintain the validity and reliability of the written test.

Marking

The written test must be marked by an independent assessor or written test marker employed by the EPAO. Written test markers must have the same occupational competence and experience as an independent assessor, as defined in the internal quality assurance section.

The EPAO must develop a marking scheme based on the grading descriptors for this assessment method. The EPAO is responsible for overseeing the marking of the written test. The EPAO must set the standard and maintain that standard over time. The EPAO must ensure standardisation and the moderation of written response tests.










Assessment location

The apprentice must take the written test in a suitably controlled and invigilated environment that is a quiet room, free from distractions and influence. The EPAO must check the venue is suitable.

The written test could take place remotely if the appropriate technology and systems are in place to prevent malpractice. The EPAO must verify the apprentice’s identity and ensure invigilation of apprentices for example with, and not limited to, 360-degree cameras and screen sharing facilities.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write a test specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of the EPA materials when consulting employers. The test specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.





The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The EPAO will develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place for example, considering previous item performance data, item analysis, standardisation, training and moderation. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the written test:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • test specification
    • sample test and mark schemes
    • live tests and mark schemes
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Multiple-choice test

Overview

A multiple-choice test is an assessment for asking questions in a controlled and invigilated environment. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

Delivery

The multiple-choice test must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

The multiple-choice test can be computer or paper based.

The multiple-choice test must consist of 40 multiple-choice questions.

Multiple-choice questions must have four options, with one correct answer.

The apprentice must be given at least 2 weeks' notice of the date and time of the multiple-choice test.

Test administration

The apprentice must have 60 minutes to complete the test.

The multiple-choice test is closed book which means that the apprentice cannot refer to reference books or materials whilst taking the test.

The multiple-choice test must be taken in the presence of an invigilator who is the responsibility of the EPAO. Specialised (proctor) software can be used if the test can be taken on-line, to ensure the security of the test.

The EPAO must have an invigilation policy setting out how the multiple-choice test must be conducted. It must state the ratio of apprentices to invigilators for the setting and allow the test to take place in a secure way.

The EPAO must verify the identity of the apprentice.

The EPAO is responsible for the security of the multiple-choice test including the arrangements for on-line testing. The EPAO must ensure that their security arrangements maintain the validity and reliability of the multiple-choice test.

Marking

The multiple-choice test must be marked by an independent assessor or marker employed by the EPAO. They must follow a marking scheme produced by the EPAO. Marking by computer is allowed where question types support this.

A correct answer gets 1 mark.

Any incorrect or missing answers get zero marks.

The EPAO is responsible for overseeing the marking of the multiple-choice test. The EPAO must ensure standardisation and moderation of the multiple-choice test.

Assessment location

The apprentice must take the multiple-choice test in a suitably controlled and invigilated environment that is a quiet room, free from distractions and influence. The EPAO must check the venue is suitable.

The multiple-choice test could take place remotely if the appropriate technology and systems are in place to prevent malpractice. The EPAO must verify the apprentice’s identity and ensure invigilation of apprentices for example with, and not limited to, 360-degree cameras and screen sharing facilities.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must write a test specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers.

The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The EPAO must develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place for example, considering previous item performance data, item analysis, standardisation, training and moderation. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The test specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the multiple-choice test:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • test specification
    • sample test and mark schemes
    • live tests and mark schemes
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

Grading

Observation with questions

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme

KSBs

Pass

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors

Distinction

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors

Task information
S1

Reads and interprets written information and data correctly to plan and complete tasks - for example, engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. (S1)

N/A

Organisation
K44 S2

Plans work and identifies and organises resources to complete tasks using organisational techniques. (K44, S2)

Planning achieves efficiencies in the use of resources and mitigates against potential issues. (K44, S2)

Work environment
K9 S3 S4 S5 S6 S24 B1

Identifies hazards and implements control measures in-line with company procedures. Conducts work in line with food safety, and health and safety regulations and company procedures. (K9, S3, S4, S5)

Conducts work in line with environment and sustainability regulations and procedures, including safe disposal of waste, recycling or re-use of materials and efficient use of resources. Prioritises health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability over other factors for example time and cost. (S6, B1)

Restores work area on completion of the activity. (S24)

Explains the importance of compliance with health and safety practice with reference to the impact on individuals and the workplace. (K9)

Justifies how the applied control measure(s) minimise risks compared to others. (S3)

Tools and equipment
K14 S7

Selects maintenance tools appropriate for the task.  

Checks the condition of tools and equipment ensuring they are safe for use. Completes or arranges maintenance of tools and equipment including calibration where required.

Uses maintenance tools and equipment safely in line with their employer’s or manufacturers’ instructions and in line with restrictions in the food and drink industry and designated areas.

Stores tools and equipment on completion of work. (K14, S7)

 

Explains the importance of undertaking pre-checks of maintenance tools and equipment in line with their employer’s or manufacturers’ requirements. (K14, S7)

Procedures
K16 S8 S25 B3

Takes responsibility to complete work within limits of authority in compliance with company standard operating and quality procedures, identifying and resolving issues or escalating issues outside of limits of authority in line with company procedures. (K16, S8, S25, B3)

Explains the importance of completing tasks in line with standard maintenance procedures. (K16, S8)

Maintenance
K10 K22 S9 S10 S11

Follows site isolation and lock off procedures (lockout, tagout), system checks, and handover to safely re-instate equipment. (K10, S9) 

Applies mechanical, fluid power system, and electrical maintenance practices and techniques in line with food safety engineering requirements to meet task requirements. (K22, S10, S11)

Ways of working achieves task efficiencies or effectiveness; for example, mitigates against potential errors (right first time), high quality finish, completes additional measures to add value. (S10, S11)

Communication
K45 S28 B4

Applies a professional approach using verbal and written communication techniques suitable for the context, adapting style and use of terminology to suit the audience. Uses sector and industry terminology correctly. (K45, S28, B4)

N/A

Documentation
K43 S27

Completes work records required for tasks correctly, legibly and in full. (K43, S27)

N/A

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme

KSBs

Pass

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors

Distinction

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors

Food and drink maintenance engineer's role
K2

Explains their role identifying:

  • limits of autonomy
  • different teams and functions
  • business operation considerations (K2)

N/A

Reliability techniques
K21 S12

Describes how they have applied reliability engineering techniques to prevent or reduce the frequency of breakdowns, failures, and operational losses in line with company procedures. (K21, S12)

Justifies why the applied reliability technique(s) was correct for the task compared to another. (K21, S12)

Component manufacture
K26 S18

Describes how they have fabricated, drilled, and joined to produce basic parts, spares, or components in line with measurement and tolerance specification. (K26, S18)

N/A

Welding
K25 S19

Describes how they have applied down-hand (flat) TIG welding techniques. Explains when MMA and MIG approaches may be required. (K25, S19)

N/A

Problem solving and fault-finding
K39 K40 S22

Describes how they have applied fault-finding and problem-solving techniques to diagnose and resolve, or escalate problems or issues, in line with company procedures. (K39, K40, S22)

Explains the value of specific fault-finding and problem-solving techniques they have used for different issues. K39, K40, S22)

Continuous improvement
K41 S23 B2

Describes how they have applied continuous improvement techniques and devised suggestions for improvement for the benefit of the organisation, customer, or work process, which also promote health and safety, food safety or the environment and sustainability. (K41, S23, B2)

Evaluates the actual or potential value of a specific improvement suggestion. (K41, S23)

Installation, commission checks, and decommission
K33 S13 S14 S15 S16

Describes how they have installed and configured instrumentation or process control systems and electrical systems in line with standards required for food and drink industry, regulations and requirements. (K33, S13, S14)

Describes how they have applied practices and techniques to assemble, position, and fix equipment or components and complete commissioning checks for food and drink or packaging equipment in a food safe environment. (S15)

Describes how they applied practices and techniques to disconnect and remove equipment or components and complete storage measures to prevent deterioration. (S16)

Explains the importance of completing installation in line with standards required for food and drink industry, regulations and requirements. (K33)

Engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information
K17 S21

Describes how they have produced and amended electrical and mechanical engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information to British standards. (K17, S21)

N/A

Report writing
K46 S29

Outlines different reports they have produced, and describes techniques applied to ensure suitability for audience. (K46, S29)

N/A

Information technology
K42 S26

Describes how they have used information technology for different purposes (such as, MIS, spreadsheets, presentation, word processing, email, virtual communication, and learning platforms), explaining how they comply with general data protection regulations (GDPR) and cyber security. (K42, S26)

N/A

Team working
K47 K49 B5 B6

Describes how they have applied team working techniques to achieve work goals taking account of equality, diversity, and inclusion. Describes how they have responded and adapted to meet work demands. (K47, K49, B5, B6)

N/A

Training and development
K48 S30 B7

Describes how they have provided guidance or training to colleagues or stakeholders using different techniques to meet the identified need. (K48, S30)

Describes CPD they have undertaken and future plans for CPD to enhance competence. Explains what the impact of their CPD has been and how it has benefited others and the business. (B7)

N/A

Written test

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme

KSBs

Pass

Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors

Food safety regulations
K5

Awareness of food safety regulation(s) and their impact on food and drink engineering: Food Safety Act, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), Threat Analysis of Critical Control Points (TACCP), and Vulnerability Assessment of Critical Control Points (VACCP). (K5)

Properties of food and drink, packaging materials and sealing techniques
K7

Understands the properties of given food and drink, packaging material or sealing technique and its impact on given engineering task. (K7)

Food and drink equipment
K12

Understands types of food and drink equipment and their application: pumps, valves, gauges, temperature controls, mixers, conveyors, depositors, sealers, safety systems, pressure systems and transmitters, human machine interface, and handheld devices. The importance of set points. (K12)

 

Spares and services considerations
K13

Understands spares and services considerations: availability, stock lead times, correct handling, the identification of equipment and parts, function and specification of parts, spares, and components, stock value, faulty stock, returns, salvageability of parts to be removed. (K13)

Mathematical and scientific principles
K18 S20

Applies mathematical and scientific principles to complete given task. (K18, S20)

Engineering materials
K19

Understands engineering materials and their properties and impact on use in a food environment (food safe). (K19)

Maintenance strategies
K20

Understands maintenance strategies and best practice: run to failure (breakdown maintenance), preventive (scheduled) maintenance, Predictive Maintenance (PdM), and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). (K20)

Equipment performance measures
K23 S17

Reads and interprets equipment performance data, understanding equipment performance terminology. (K23, S17)

Mechanical principles
K24

Understands mechanical principles. Types of mechanical drives, belts, chains, and gears: alignment, and how to identify wear. Types of bearings: application, alignment, and fit. (K24)

Pneumatic and hydraulic system principles
K27

Understands pneumatic and hydraulic system principles: transfer of energy inside fluid power systems in the food and drink industry. (K27)

Basic engineering theory and thermodynamic principles
K28

Understands basic engineering theory and thermodynamic principles on heat transfer used in the food and drink industry: how it works and maintenance requirements. (K28)

Electrical principles
K29

Understands electrical principles. Basic electrical theory: LV (Low Voltage), HV (High Voltage), current, resistance, symbols and terminology. Electrical first aid. Alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) systems. Testing equipment. Electrical circuit theory, electrical machines, electrical safety systems, and smart solutions. (K29)

Control circuit principles
K30

Understands control circuits principles. Basic components (Switches, relays, contactors, overloads, circuit breakers), power supplies, and calibration. (K30)

Safety circuits
K31

Understands safety circuits: safety system categories, safety system architecture and components, characteristics of safety system components. What they do and why they are important (legality and performance). (K31)

Motors and control systems
K32

Understands types of motors and control systems and how they work: mechanical and electrical properties, programming of variable speed drives and parameters, soft starts. (K32)

Multiple-choice test

Grade Minimum marks required Maximum marks required
Fail 0 27
Pass 28 40

Overall EPA grading

The assessment methods contribute equally to the overall EPA grade.

Performance in the EPA will determine the apprenticeship grade of:

An independent assessor must individually grade the observation with questions and interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence according to the requirements set out in this EPA plan. An independent assessor or written test marker must individually grade the written test according to the requirements set out in this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they are awarded an overall EPA fail.

The apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods to get an overall pass. To achieve an overall EPA merit, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in the observation with questions or interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, and a pass in the other assessment methods: written test and multiple-choice test. To achieve an overall EPA distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in the observation with questions and interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, and a pass in the other assessment methods: written test and multiple-choice test.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Observation with questions Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Written test Multiple-choice test Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Any grade Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Any grade Any grade Fail
Any grade Any grade Any grade Fail Fail
Any grade Any grade Fail Any grade Fail
Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass Pass Merit
Distinction Pass Pass Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Pass Pass Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If an apprentice fails one or more assessment method(s), they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 2 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 4 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • undertake 20% off-the-job training as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • undertake the EPA including meeting all gateway requirements

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support a minimum of 20% off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the level required by the occupational standard and so is ready for EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in accordance with this EPA plan
  • ensure the apprentice is well prepared for the EPA
  • require the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows appropriate opportunity for the KSBs to be met
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a daily basis
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must: 

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO)
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship
  • understand the occupational standard
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials (for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material)
  • appoint suitably qualified and competent independent assessors and oversee their working
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA as appropriate
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading
  • provide adequate information, advice and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer
  • where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary
  • develop and provide appropriate assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances, including when the EPAO is the training provider for example, a HEI), there must be no conflict of interest
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of regular and robust IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and/or markers (where used)
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for all independent assessors before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy
  • verify the identity of the apprentice being assessed
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard

Pre-gateway, the EPAO must: 

  • make all necessary contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • provide adequate information, advice and guidance documentation to enable the apprentice, employers and training provider to prepare for the EPA
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer

At the gateway, the EPAO must: 

  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible

Post-gateway, the EPAO must: 

  • where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary.

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the subject matter
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances, including when the EPAO is the training provider for example HEI
  • attend induction training
  • attend standardisation events when they begin working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually on this apprenticeship 
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan, and without extending the EPA unnecessarily
  • assess against the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods and as determined by the EPAO, and without extending the EPA unnecessarily
  • make all grading decisions
  • record and report all assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider should:

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours as listed in the occupational standard
  • conduct training covering any knowledge, skill or behaviour requirement agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA. Where the training provider is the EPAO for example HEI, there must be procedures in place to mitigate against any conflict of interest

Marker

As a minimum, the marker should:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances including when the EPAO is the training provider for example HEI
  • mark test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures

Invigilator

As a minimum, the invigilators should:

  • attend induction training as directed by the EPAO
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances, including when the EPAO is the training provider for example HEI
  • invigilate and supervise apprentices during tests and in breaks during assessment methods to prevent malpractice in accordance with the EPAO’s invigilation procedures

Written test marker

As a minimum, the written test marker must:

  • meet the same requirements as the marker
  • have the occupation competence and experience as an independent assessor, as defined in the internal quality assurance section

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance (IQA)

Internal quality assurance refers to how the EPAO ensures valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. The EPAO must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section.

They must also:

  • have effective and rigorous quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 3 gained in the last 3 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
    • meet the following minimum requirements:
      • hold or working towards an assessor qualification
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide regular training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship for an independent assessor:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider

Mapping of KSBs to assessment methods

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Food and drink sector awareness. The industry's regulator: The Food Standards Agency. Types of organisations: branded and non-branded, and high and low care sites. Types of food and drink products: ambient, frozen, fresh, chilled, confectionery, and liquid. End-to-end supply chain. Customers and consumers. Customer specifications: purpose and consequences of non-compliance. Implications of product shelf life.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K2

Food and drink maintenance engineer's role. Limits of autonomy. Different teams and functions involved in production. Business operation considerations: efficiency, customer satisfaction, competitiveness, minimising risks to production, and ethical practices.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K3

Principles of quality management systems and processes in the food and drink industry and impact on customer requirements. Customer and food trade association standards for example, British Retail Consortium, Retailer standards. Internal and external audits and impact on maintenance.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K4

Food science and technology - fundamentals of how engineering is used in food and drink production: aseptic filling and processing, chilling, freezing, heat processing, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), preservation, and packaging.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K5

Food safety regulations awareness and their impact on food and drink engineering: Food Safety Act, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), Threat Analysis of Critical Control Points (TACCP), and Vulnerability Assessment of Critical Control Points (VACCP).

Back to Grading
Written test
K6

Food safety: control of contamination hazards (microbiological, physical, and chemical). The risk of contamination and impact on product integrity and health of consumers. Allergens. The importance and impact of temperature and process control measures. Regulatory information and date code responsibilities. Hygienic engineering design of food premises and equipment, and hygiene requirements of operators. Cleaning and disinfection principles, procedures, and methods: Cleaning in place (CIP), cleaning out of place, and chemical impact. Pest control.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K7

Properties of food and drink, packaging materials and sealing techniques and impact on engineering tasks.

Back to Grading
Written test
K8

Health and safety regulations awareness and their application to food and drink engineering: Health and Safety at Work Act, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (CoSHH), Working in confined spaces, Working at Height, Lone working, Provision of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER), Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres (DSEAR), Pressure Equipment Directive (PED), Electricity at work regulations, Noise regulation, L8 Legionella, Display Screen Equipment, The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR), and Construction Design Management regulations. Slips trips and falls. Types of incidents: fire, accidents, and near-misses. Mitigation methods. Incident management. Near miss reporting.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K9

Health and safety practice: risk assessments and method statements, manual handling, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and signage and barriers.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K10

Safe isolation of process fluids, gases, electricity, and stored energy: Lockout, tagout (LOTO).

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K11

Environmental regulations and requirements awareness and their application to food and drink engineering. Environmental Protection Act. Sustainability. Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE). Hazardous waste regulations. Waste management. Recyclable materials and waste disposal procedures. Energy monitoring. Data logging to optimise energy performance. The Climate Change Agreements. Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC). Renewable and alternative energy sources. Energy reduction. Types of pollution and control measures: noise, smells, spills, and waste. Efficient use of resources. Environmental permits.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K12

Types of food and drink equipment and their application: pumps, valves, gauges, temperature controls, mixers, conveyors, depositors, sealers, safety systems, pressure systems and transmitters, human machine interface, and handheld devices. The importance of set points.

Back to Grading
Written test
K13

Spares and services considerations: availability, stock lead times, correct handling, the identification of equipment and parts, function and specification of parts, spares, and components, stock value, faulty stock, returns, salvageability of parts to be removed.

Back to Grading
Written test
K14

Maintenance tools: selection, correct use, maintenance, storage requirements. Restrictions in food and drink industry and designated areas.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K15

Engineering standards and regulations awareness and their application to food and drink engineering: British Standards (BS), International Organisation for Standardisation standards (ISO), European Norm (EN), and Atmospheres and Explosives (ATEX). Manufacturers’ manuals: what they are and how to use them.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K16

Standard operating and quality assurance procedures (SOP): what they are and how to use them.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K17

British standards for engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K18

Engineering mathematical and scientific principles: calculations, conversions, and equipment sizing and dimensions.

Back to Grading
Written test
K19

Engineering materials and their properties: impact on use in a food environment (food safe).

Back to Grading
Written test
K20

Maintenance strategies and best practice: run to failure (breakdown maintenance), preventive (scheduled) maintenance, Predictive Maintenance (PdM), and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM).

Back to Grading
Written test
K21

Reliability techniques - critical tools: condition monitoring, oil sampling, thermography, vibration analysis, and ultrasound. How they are used to reduce breakdowns, failures, and operational losses.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K22

Food safety engineering: food grade oils, greases, cleaning fluids, and safe use of tools and equipment.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K23

Equipment performance measures: data and how to use it. Terminology: mean time between failure, and overall equipment effectiveness (availability).

Back to Grading
Written test
K24

Mechanical principles. Types of mechanical drives, belts, chains, and gears: alignment, and how to identify wear. Types of bearings: application, alignment, and fit.

Back to Grading
Written test
K25

Principles of down-hand (flat) TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding techniques in food environment: butt and tee. Awareness of MMA (Manual Metal Arc) and MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding practices and when they need to be used.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K26

Component manufacturing uses and requirements. Turning and milling, grinding, drilling, bench fitting techniques. Preparation for the food and drink environment. Threads, fit, finish, joining techniques, measurement and tolerance, and material selection considerations.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K27

Pneumatic and hydraulic system principles: transfer of energy inside fluid power systems in the food and drink industry.

Back to Grading
Written test
K28

Basic engineering theory and thermodynamic principles on heat transfer used in the food and drink industry: how it works and maintenance requirements.

Back to Grading
Written test
K29

Electrical principles. Basic electrical theory: LV (Low Voltage), HV (High Voltage), current, resistance, symbols and terminology. Electrical first aid. Alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) systems. Testing equipment. Electrical circuit theory, electrical machines, electrical safety systems, and smart solutions.

Back to Grading
Written test
K30

Control circuits principles. Basic components (switches, relays, contactors, overloads, circuit breakers), power supplies, and calibration.

Back to Grading
Written test
K31

Safety circuits: safety system categories, safety system architecture and components, characteristics of safety system components. What they do and why they are important (legality and performance).

Back to Grading
Written test
K32

Types of motors and control systems and how they work: mechanical and electrical properties, programming of variable speed drives and parameters, soft starts.

Back to Grading
Written test
K33

Electrical instrumentation and control installation, commissioning and decommissioning practices and techniques to standards required for food and drink industry. Ingress Protection (IP) and ATEX ratings. Testing and fault finding approved instrument requirements. Arc flash protection requirements.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K34

Automation. Instrumentation and calibration techniques for systems: thermo, weights, and flow. Robotics and data acquisition (SCADA) and smart network systems. Communication systems: Profinet, Ethernet, Profibus, CANopen, and DeviceNet.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K35

Types of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). How they work, system maintenance and architecture. Digital, analogue inputs, outputs, and IOT. Hardware interface and field wiring.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K36

Sensors and motion control. Types of sensors and how they work: digital, analogue, pressure level, probes, inductive and smart. Encoders and position control: selection procedures.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K37

Awareness of services and utilities in the context of food safety importance and impact: water supply and systems, boiler control, electrical distribution system, air compressors, steam boilers, refrigeration system, building management, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) controls, access control systems, effluent and waste, and chilled water systems.

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K38

Principles of factory digitalisation (Industry 4.0).

Back to Grading
Multiple-choice test
K39

Problem solving techniques: root cause analysis, 6 thinking hats, DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control), and PDCA (Plan Do Check Act).

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K40

Fault finding techniques: root cause analysis, 5 Whys, fishbone, and half-split. Diagnostic tools and equipment.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K41

Continuous improvement techniques: lean, 6-sigma, KAIZEN, 5S (Sort, set, shine, standardise and sustain), and SMED (Single-Minute Exchange of Dies).

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K42

Information technology: Management Information Systems (MIS), spreadsheets, presentation, word processing, email, virtual communication and learning platforms. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Cyber security requirements.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K43

Maintenance work recording and documentation requirements.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K44

Organisation techniques: planning, time management, workflow, and work scheduling and prioritisation.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K45

Communication techniques: verbal, written, and electronic. Adapting style to audience. Engineering terminology.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
K46

Report writing techniques.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K47

Team working techniques: how to work as part of a team, understanding the importance of establishing and meeting the requirements of different roles.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K48

Workplace training and buddying techniques: how to pass on knowledge and skills to others.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K49

Equality, diversity, and inclusion in the workplace: what it means and why it is important.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Read and interpret task related information and data. For example, work instructions, SOPs, quality control documentation, Service Level Agreements, specifications, engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information, work instructions, and operation manuals.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S2

Plan work. Identify and organise resources to complete tasks.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S3

Identify hazards and control measures to mitigate risks.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S4

Comply with food safety regulations and procedures.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S5

Comply with health and safety regulations and procedures.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S6

Comply with environment and sustainability regulations and procedures: safe disposal of waste, re-cycling or re-use of materials and efficient use of resources.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S7

Select, check the condition, and safely use maintenance tools and equipment. Store tools and equipment. Complete or arrange maintenance of tools and equipment including calibration where required.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S8

Follow standard operating procedures and quality procedures.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S9

Follow site isolation and lock off procedures (lockout, tagout) and re-instatement of equipment with system checks and handover.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S10

Apply mechanical and fluid power system maintenance practices and techniques. For example, check levels, parts wear, pressure, and sensors, grease and lubricate parts, replace, fit components, and calibrate equipment.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S11

Apply electrical and control maintenance practices and techniques including use of electrical testing equipment and instruments. For example, panel risk assessment, fixed wire installation testing, fault finding, thermographic surveys, and checking protection settings.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S12

Apply reliability engineering techniques to prevent or reduce the likelihood or frequency of failures. For example, condition monitoring, oil sampling, thermography, vibration analysis, and ultrasound.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S13

Install and configure instrumentation or process control systems.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S14

Install and configure electrical systems. For example, add distribution boards to circuits, single and three phase motors (AC and DC).

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S15

Assemble, position and fix equipment or components. Complete commissioning checks.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S16

Disconnect and remove equipment or components. Complete storage measures to prevent deterioration.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S17

Read and interpret equipment performance data.

Back to Grading
Written test
S18

Fabricate, drill, and join to produce basic parts, spares or components to measurement and tolerance specification.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S19

Apply down-hand (flat) TIG welding techniques: butt and tee.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S20

Apply mathematical techniques to solve engineering problems.

Back to Grading
Written test
S21

Produce and amend electrical and mechanical engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. For example, for new component parts or change in circuit diagram or panel.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S22

Apply fault-finding and problem-solving techniques for example, using PLC data to diagnose issues and locate faults on industrial network.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S23

Apply continuous improvement techniques to understand current performance; collect and record data. Devise suggestions for improvement.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S24

Restore the work area on completion of activity.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S25

Resolve or escalate issues.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S26

Use information technology. For example, for document creation, communication, and information management. Comply with GDPR. Comply with cyber security.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S27

Record work activity. For example, asset management records, work sheets, checklists, waste environmental records, and any business or legal reporting requirements.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S28

Communicate verbal and written. For example, with colleagues and stakeholders. Use engineering terminology where appropriate.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
S29

Produce reports for example, equipment performance reports.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S30

Provide guidance or training to colleagues or stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Prioritise health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
B2

Promote health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3

Take ownership for own work and accountability for quality of work.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
B4

Apply a professional approach.

Back to Grading
Observation with questions
B5

Team-focus to meet work goals: respectful to others, builds relationship with others, and positive inclusion.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B6

Respond and adapt to work demands.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B7

Committed to Continued Professional Development (CPD) to maintain and enhance their competence.

Back to Grading
Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Observation with questions - Observation

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Task information

S1

N/A

Read and interpret task related information and data. For example, work instructions, SOPs, quality control documentation, Service Level Agreements, specifications, engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information, work instructions, and operation manuals. (S1)

N/A

Organisation
K44
S2

Organisation techniques: planning, time management, workflow, and work scheduling and prioritisation. (K44)

Plan work. Identify and organise resources to complete tasks. (S2)

N/A

Work environment
K9
S3 S4 S5 S6 S24
B1

Health and safety practice: risk assessments and method statements, manual handling, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and signage and barriers. (K9)

Identify hazards and control measures to mitigate risks. (S3)

Comply with food safety regulations and procedures. (S4)

Comply with health and safety regulations and procedures. (S5)

Comply with environment and sustainability regulations and procedures: safe disposal of waste, re-cycling or re-use of materials and efficient use of resources. (S6)

Restore the work area on completion of activity. (S24)

Prioritise health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability. (B1)

Tools and equipment
K14
S7

Maintenance tools: selection, correct use, maintenance, storage requirements. Restrictions in food and drink industry and designated areas. (K14)

Select, check the condition, and safely use maintenance tools and equipment. Store tools and equipment. Complete or arrange maintenance of tools and equipment including calibration where required. (S7)

N/A

Procedures
K16
S8 S25
B3

Standard operating and quality assurance procedures (SOP): what they are and how to use them. (K16)

Follow standard operating procedures and quality procedures. (S8)

Resolve or escalate issues. (S25)

Take ownership for own work and accountability for quality of work. (B3)

Maintenance
K10 K22
S9 S10 S11

Safe isolation of process fluids, gases, electricity, and stored energy: Lockout, tagout (LOTO). (K10)

Food safety engineering: food grade oils, greases, cleaning fluids, and safe use of tools and equipment. (K22)

Follow site isolation and lock off procedures (lockout, tagout) and re-instatement of equipment with system checks and handover. (S9)

Apply mechanical and fluid power system maintenance practices and techniques. For example, check levels, parts wear, pressure, and sensors, grease and lubricate parts, replace, fit components, and calibrate equipment. (S10)

Apply electrical and control maintenance practices and techniques including use of electrical testing equipment and instruments. For example, panel risk assessment, fixed wire installation testing, fault finding, thermographic surveys, and checking protection settings. (S11)

N/A

Communication
K45
S28
B4

Communication techniques: verbal, written, and electronic. Adapting style to audience. Engineering terminology. (K45)

Communicate verbal and written. For example, with colleagues and stakeholders. Use engineering terminology where appropriate. (S28)

Apply a professional approach. (B4)

Documentation
K43
S27

Maintenance work recording and documentation requirements. (K43)

Record work activity. For example, asset management records, work sheets, checklists, waste environmental records, and any business or legal reporting requirements. (S27)

N/A

Interview underpinned by a portfolio of evidence - Discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Food and drink maintenance engineer's role
K2

Food and drink maintenance engineer's role. Limits of autonomy. Different teams and functions involved in production. Business operation considerations: efficiency, customer satisfaction, competitiveness, minimising risks to production, and ethical practices. (K2)

N/A

N/A

Reliability techniques
K21
S12

Reliability techniques - critical tools: condition monitoring, oil sampling, thermography, vibration analysis, and ultrasound. How they are used to reduce breakdowns, failures, and operational losses. (K21)

Apply reliability engineering techniques to prevent or reduce the likelihood or frequency of failures. For example, condition monitoring, oil sampling, thermography, vibration analysis, and ultrasound. (S12)

N/A

Component manufacture
K26
S18

Component manufacturing uses and requirements. Turning and milling, grinding, drilling, bench fitting techniques. Preparation for the food and drink environment. Threads, fit, finish, joining techniques, measurement and tolerance, and material selection considerations. (K26)

Fabricate, drill, and join to produce basic parts, spares or components to measurement and tolerance specification. (S18)

N/A

Welding
K25
S19

Principles of down-hand (flat) TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding techniques in food environment: butt and tee. Awareness of MMA (Manual Metal Arc) and MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding practices and when they need to be used. (K25)

Apply down-hand (flat) TIG welding techniques: butt and tee. (S19)

N/A

Problem solving and fault-finding
K39 K40
S22

Problem solving techniques: root cause analysis, 6 thinking hats, DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control), and PDCA (Plan Do Check Act). (K39)

Fault finding techniques: root cause analysis, 5 Whys, fishbone, and half-split. Diagnostic tools and equipment. (K40)

Apply fault-finding and problem-solving techniques for example, using PLC data to diagnose issues and locate faults on industrial network. (S22)

N/A

Continuous improvement
K41
S23
B2

Continuous improvement techniques: lean, 6-sigma, KAIZEN, 5S (Sort, set, shine, standardise and sustain), and SMED (Single-Minute Exchange of Dies). (K41)

Apply continuous improvement techniques to understand current performance; collect and record data. Devise suggestions for improvement. (S23)

Promote health and safety, food safety, and the environment and sustainability. (B2)

Installation, commission checks, and decommission
K33
S13 S14 S15 S16

Electrical instrumentation and control installation, commissioning and decommissioning practices and techniques to standards required for food and drink industry. Ingress Protection (IP) and ATEX ratings. Testing and fault finding approved instrument requirements. Arc flash protection requirements. (K33)

Install and configure instrumentation or process control systems. (S13)

Install and configure electrical systems. For example, add distribution boards to circuits, single and three phase motors (AC and DC). (S14)

Assemble, position and fix equipment or components. Complete commissioning checks. (S15)

Disconnect and remove equipment or components. Complete storage measures to prevent deterioration. (S16)

N/A

Engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information
K17
S21

British standards for engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. (K17)

Produce and amend electrical and mechanical engineering representations, drawings, and graphical information. For example, for new component parts or change in circuit diagram or panel. (S21)

N/A

Report writing
K46
S29

Report writing techniques. (K46)

Produce reports for example, equipment performance reports. (S29)

N/A

Information technology
K42
S26

Information technology: Management Information Systems (MIS), spreadsheets, presentation, word processing, email, virtual communication and learning platforms. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Cyber security requirements. (K42)

Use information technology. For example, for document creation, communication, and information management. Comply with GDPR. Comply with cyber security. (S26)

N/A

Team working
K47 K49

B5 B6

Team working techniques: how to work as part of a team, understanding the importance of establishing and meeting the requirements of different roles. (K47)

Equality, diversity, and inclusion in the workplace: what it means and why it is important. (K49)

N/A

Team-focus to meet work goals: respectful to others, builds relationship with others, and positive inclusion. (B5)

Respond and adapt to work demands. (B6)

Training and development
K48
S30
B7

Workplace training and buddying techniques: how to pass on knowledge and skills to others. (K48)

Provide guidance or training to colleagues or stakeholders. (S30)

Committed to Continued Professional Development (CPD) to maintain and enhance their competence. (B7)

Written test - TestExamination

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Food safety regulations
K5

Food safety regulations awareness and their impact on food and drink engineering: Food Safety Act, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), Threat Analysis of Critical Control Points (TACCP), and Vulnerability Assessment of Critical Control Points (VACCP). (K5)

N/A

N/A

Properties of food and drink, packaging materials and sealing techniques
K7

Properties of food and drink, packaging materials and sealing techniques and impact on engineering tasks. (K7)

N/A

N/A

Food and drink equipment
K12

Types of food and drink equipment and their application: pumps, valves, gauges, temperature controls, mixers, conveyors, depositors, sealers, safety systems, pressure systems and transmitters, human machine interface, and handheld devices. The importance of set points. (K12)

N/A

N/A

Spares and services considerations
K13

Spares and services considerations: availability, stock lead times, correct handling, the identification of equipment and parts, function and specification of parts, spares, and components, stock value, faulty stock, returns, salvageability of parts to be removed. (K13)

N/A

N/A

Mathematical and scientific principles
K18
S20

Engineering mathematical and scientific principles: calculations, conversions, and equipment sizing and dimensions. (K18)

Apply mathematical techniques to solve engineering problems. (S20)

N/A

Engineering materials
K19

Engineering materials and their properties: impact on use in a food environment (food safe). (K19)

N/A

N/A

Maintenance strategies
K20

Maintenance strategies and best practice: run to failure (breakdown maintenance), preventive (scheduled) maintenance, Predictive Maintenance (PdM), and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). (K20)

N/A

N/A

Equipment performance measures
K23
S17

Equipment performance measures: data and how to use it. Terminology: mean time between failure, and overall equipment effectiveness (availability). (K23)

Read and interpret equipment performance data. (S17)

N/A

Mechanical principles
K24

Mechanical principles. Types of mechanical drives, belts, chains, and gears: alignment, and how to identify wear. Types of bearings: application, alignment, and fit. (K24)

N/A

N/A

Pneumatic and hydraulic system principles
K27

Pneumatic and hydraulic system principles: transfer of energy inside fluid power systems in the food and drink industry. (K27)

N/A

N/A

Basic engineering theory and thermodynamic principles
K28

Basic engineering theory and thermodynamic principles on heat transfer used in the food and drink industry: how it works and maintenance requirements. (K28)

N/A

N/A

Electrical principles
K29

Electrical principles. Basic electrical theory: LV (Low Voltage), HV (High Voltage), current, resistance, symbols and terminology. Electrical first aid. Alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) systems. Testing equipment. Electrical circuit theory, electrical machines, electrical safety systems, and smart solutions. (K29)

N/A

N/A

Control circuit principles
K30

Control circuits principles. Basic components (switches, relays, contactors, overloads, circuit breakers), power supplies, and calibration. (K30)

N/A

N/A

Safety circuits
K31

Safety circuits: safety system categories, safety system architecture and components, characteristics of safety system components. What they do and why they are important (legality and performance). (K31)

N/A

N/A

Motors and control systems
K32

Types of motors and control systems and how they work: mechanical and electrical properties, programming of variable speed drives and parameters, soft starts. (K32)

N/A

N/A

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Employers involved in creating the standard: Bakkavor, James T Blakemans and Co Ltd, Coca-Cola Europacific Partners, Kraft Heinz, Lucozade Ribena Suntory Limited, Mars Wrigley Confectionary, Moy Park Müller UK and Ireland, Nestle UK and Ireland, New York Bakery Grupo Bimbo UK, Ornua Foods UK, Pladis Global, Playin Choc, Premier Foods, Saputo, WM Morrison Supermarkets PLC.

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 End-point assessment plan, funding and standard revised. 04/07/2022 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 09/12/2014 03/07/2022 Not set

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