Starts on this apprenticeship are paused in the absence of an End Point Assessment Organisation (EPAO). Starts will be permitted again once a suitable EPAO is in place.

Key information

  1. Status: Approved for delivery
  2. Reference: ST0783
  3. Version: 1.1
  4. Level: 3
  5. Typical duration to gateway: 15 months
  6. Typical EPA period: 3 months
  7. Maximum funding: £9000
  8. Route: Creative and design
  9. Date updated: 18/10/2023
  10. Approved for delivery: 9 November 2020
  11. Lars code: 606
  12. EQA provider: Ofqual is the intended EQA provider
  13. Review: this apprenticeship will be reviewed in accordance with our change request policy.
Print apprenticeship summary

Apprenticeship summary

Overview of the role

To support their organisation to identify costumes for short/long term performance plans and be responsible for the care, maintenance and usage of costumes, ensuring that all costume elements are at the standard of the designer’s specification.

Occupation summary

This occupation can be found in production and technical departments of theatres, television, film, dance and fashion productions and cultural organisations. This occupation runs across a range of sectors, where a costume might be worn, such as music events, pop concerts, recitals, choirs, sports events, university events.

The duties of a costume technician can be varied due to the nature of the sector and technicians would need to be able to adapt to the requirements of the setting.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to provide support relating to the care, maintenance and dressing of cast or performers in costumes in a production environment.

The role typically involves the washing, ironing, steaming, repairing, setting, checking and dressing of costumes used on performers.  They will work with a variety of other performance related departments and require a high level of understanding of the detail within work documentation to ensure continuity of costume wear - for example costume character profiles and costume plotting.

They make sure the outfits are ready for the actors and performers and help by making simple alterations, if required. Or they might be asked to collect garments and supplies or complete returns.

They are likely to help with setting up workrooms and may help with the ageing and distressing of costumes. They may be given specific responsibility for crowd fittings or packing costumes for overseas shipment to other locations or units.

This is an active role which requires technicians to be flexible and responsive to production or performance needs. For example - fastening intricate costumes, moving backstage during a performance in tight timeframes or moving costumes around. 

This role can be found in a range of organisations such as theatres. They support productions such as plays, opera, ballet or musicals that can be long running or short-term productions.  They can also be found at large scale events such as opening and closing ceremonies in sports, fashion shows, commercials and film and television.

They will work alongside and interact with a range of production staff such as wardrobe managers, costume supervisors, costume makers, designers, stage managers, stylists, sound departments, wigs, hair and make-up technicians, script supervisors and continuity teams.  Performers such as actors, dancers, singers and models are assigned to costume technician by their supervisor to support from a costume or wardrobe perspective before, during and after the performance.

They work in organisations ranging from small to large. The nature of the creative sector means that this can vary considerably as can contract lengths.

They will work under the instruction of a supervisor and are required to follow delegated tasks completing given work independently.  They will take responsibility for the costumes of an assigned group of performers or cast and  their agreed costumes.  

They will work as part of a team but take full responsibility for their assigned tasks.  They must take into account deadlines, health and safety and professional ethics and sustainability within a specific environment and be confident in reporting any issues. 

Out of hours working and travel may be required as part of the role.

Typical job titles include:

Costume assistant Costume running assistant Dressers Performance support technician Standby costume assistant Wardrobe technician

Duties

  • Duty 1 Interpret the brief, production schedule, costume breakdown and plot in relation to costume or wardrobe requirements.
  • Duty 2 Follow production scheduling to ensure deadlines are met.
  • Duty 3 Assist with costume continuity, according to context.
  • Duty 4 Manage the impact on costumes of short notice changes such as cast changes, understudies, new cast members, script changes or environmental changes as instructed by a senior team member.
  • Duty 5 Check and maintain costumes before, during and after use, noting any required repairs or, alterations needed.
  • Duty 6 Assist with costume fittings.
  • Duty 7 Set all areas for costuming of the production such as trucks, dressing rooms, costume tents or quick change areas.
  • Duty 8 Dress or assist with dressing the cast.
  • Duty 9 Assist with distribution, coding, logging and running order of costumes for the performance, or show or production.
  • Duty 10 Inform supervisors about wardrobe consumables and running wardrobe supplies stock levels. Assist in the purchasing and delivery of items if required.
  • Duty 11 Clean and press costumes, organise dry or wet cleaning as instructed. Liaise with specialist suppliers if required.
  • Duty 12 Pack and store costumes in accordance with production or performance requirements.
  • Duty 13 Maintain all relevant paperwork, show notes, costume description lists, check offs, understudy information, costume maintenance information alongside all paperwork required by other departments. For example costume location lists.

Apprenticeship summary

ST0783, costume technician - stage and screen level 3

This is a summary of the key things that you – the apprentice and your employer need to know about your end-point assessment (EPA). You and your employer should read the EPA plan for the full details. It has information on assessment method requirements, roles and responsibilities, and re-sits and re-takes.

What is an end-point assessment and why it happens

An EPA is an assessment at the end of your apprenticeship. It will assess you against the knowledge, skills, and behaviours (KSBs) in the occupational standard. Your training will cover the KSBs. The EPA is your opportunity to show an independent assessor how well you can carry out the occupation you have been trained for.

Your employer will choose an end-point assessment organisation (EPAO) to deliver the EPA. Your employer and training provider should tell you what to expect and how to prepare for your EPA.

The length of the training for this apprenticeship is typically 15 months. The EPA period is typically 3 months.

The overall grades available for this apprenticeship are:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction


EPA gateway

The EPA gateway is when the EPAO checks and confirms that you have met any requirements required before you start the EPA. You will only enter the gateway when your employer says you are ready.

The gateway requirements for your EPA are:

  • achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, you must submit a portfolio of evidence

Assessment methods



Who to contact for help or more information

You should speak to your employer if you have a query that relates to your job.

You should speak to your training provider if you have any questions about your training or EPA before it starts.

You should receive detailed information and support from the EPAO before the EPA starts. You should speak to them if you have any questions about your EPA once it has started.Reasonable adjustments

If you have a disability, a physical or mental health condition or other special considerations, you may be able to have a reasonable adjustment that takes this into account. You should speak to your employer, training provider and EPAO and ask them what support you can get. The EPAO will decide if an adjustment is appropriate.

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation can be found in production and technical departments of theatres, television, film, dance and fashion productions and cultural organisations. This occupation runs across a range of sectors, where a costume might be worn, such as music events, pop concerts, recitals, choirs, sports events, university events.

The duties of a costume technician can be varied due to the nature of the sector and technicians would need to be able to adapt to the requirements of the setting.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to provide support relating to the care, maintenance and dressing of cast or performers in costumes in a production environment.

The role typically involves the washing, ironing, steaming, repairing, setting, checking and dressing of costumes used on performers.  They will work with a variety of other performance related departments and require a high level of understanding of the detail within work documentation to ensure continuity of costume wear - for example costume character profiles and costume plotting.

They make sure the outfits are ready for the actors and performers and help by making simple alterations, if required. Or they might be asked to collect garments and supplies or complete returns.

They are likely to help with setting up workrooms and may help with the ageing and distressing of costumes. They may be given specific responsibility for crowd fittings or packing costumes for overseas shipment to other locations or units.

This is an active role which requires technicians to be flexible and responsive to production or performance needs. For example - fastening intricate costumes, moving backstage during a performance in tight timeframes or moving costumes around. 

This role can be found in a range of organisations such as theatres. They support productions such as plays, opera, ballet or musicals that can be long running or short-term productions.  They can also be found at large scale events such as opening and closing ceremonies in sports, fashion shows, commercials and film and television.

They will work alongside and interact with a range of production staff such as wardrobe managers, costume supervisors, costume makers, designers, stage managers, stylists, sound departments, wigs, hair and make-up technicians, script supervisors and continuity teams.  Performers such as actors, dancers, singers and models are assigned to costume technician by their supervisor to support from a costume or wardrobe perspective before, during and after the performance.

They work in organisations ranging from small to large. The nature of the creative sector means that this can vary considerably as can contract lengths.

They will work under the instruction of a supervisor and are required to follow delegated tasks completing given work independently.  They will take responsibility for the costumes of an assigned group of performers or cast and  their agreed costumes.  

They will work as part of a team but take full responsibility for their assigned tasks.  They must take into account deadlines, health and safety and professional ethics and sustainability within a specific environment and be confident in reporting any issues. 

Out of hours working and travel may be required as part of the role.

Typical job titles include:

Costume assistant Costume running assistant Dressers Performance support technician Standby costume assistant Wardrobe technician

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Interpret the brief, production schedule, costume breakdown and plot in relation to costume or wardrobe requirements.

K1 K2 K5 K7 K11 K12

S1 S7 S12 S17 S18

Duty 2 Follow production scheduling to ensure deadlines are met.

K1 K2 K7

S1 S7 S9 S10

B1

Duty 3 Assist with costume continuity, according to context.

K10 K17 K18

S14

Duty 4 Manage the impact on costumes of short notice changes such as cast changes, understudies, new cast members, script changes or environmental changes as instructed by a senior team member.

K4 K6 K10

S13

B4

Duty 5 Check and maintain costumes before, during and after use, noting any required repairs or, alterations needed.

K10 K12 K13 K14 K18

S4 S5 S15 S16 S19 S20

B1

Duty 6 Assist with costume fittings.

S6 S9 S10 S11 S20 S21

B2 B3

Duty 7 Set all areas for costuming of the production such as trucks, dressing rooms, costume tents or quick change areas.

K7

B1

Duty 8 Dress or assist with dressing the cast.

K4 K6 K7 K10 K11 K19

S2 S9 S10 S11 S20 S21

B2 B3

Duty 9 Assist with distribution, coding, logging and running order of costumes for the performance, or show or production.

K3 K18

S3 S8 S9 S14 S20

B3

Duty 10 Inform supervisors about wardrobe consumables and running wardrobe supplies stock levels. Assist in the purchasing and delivery of items if required.

K3

S12 S17 S19

Duty 11 Clean and press costumes, organise dry or wet cleaning as instructed. Liaise with specialist suppliers if required.

K3 K7 K8 K14

S2 S4 S5 S6 S16 S17

B3

Duty 12 Pack and store costumes in accordance with production or performance requirements.

K7 K8 K15

S2 S3 S4 S5 S16 S23

Duty 13 Maintain all relevant paperwork, show notes, costume description lists, check offs, understudy information, costume maintenance information alongside all paperwork required by other departments. For example costume location lists.

K3 K5 K9 K16 K18

S1 S5 S7 S8 S12 S14 S18 S19 S22 S23

B1

KSBs

Knowledge

K1: Departmental structure, vision and purpose and how each department interacts with each other. Back to Duty

K2: The significance and importance of the role within the setting and the importance of working logically with other departments. Back to Duty

K3: Communication techniques: verbal, written, and digital. How to use industry specific terminology relevant to the role. Back to Duty

K4: Equality, diversity and inclusion principles and the relevance to the role. Back to Duty

K5: Data protection laws and confidentiality protocols for the setting and the impact on the role including social media policy. Back to Duty

K6: Current workplace rules and procedures regarding safeguarding and child protection and how they impact the role. Back to Duty

K7: Health and Safety legislation including Health and Safety at Work etc Act (HaSaWA), Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), personal protective equipment (PPE). Manual handling techniques and company health, safety and security policies. Back to Duty

K8: The importance of environmental sustainability and departmental processes for working on a production. For example, ‘Theatre Green Book’ for theatre, Albert Carbon Calculator for screen or activities that contribute to the monitoring and reduction of the carbon footprint. Back to Duty

K9: The requirements and purpose of show or production documentation such as costume breakdown, running notes, running lists, dressing plots, costume description lists. Back to Duty

K10: Dressing protocols pre, during and post production including the order of processes. For example, make-up, wigs, microphone. The importance of collaborative working processes and interdependency of departments in a performance or production. Back to Duty

K11: How to identify clothing and other costume elements to meet period or genre requirements for a specific performance or production. Back to Duty

K12: How to maintain the design of costumes taking into account the fit and the properties of fabrics and materials and how they are used in the context of the performance or production. Back to Duty

K13: Machine and hand sewing techniques and the importance of this for the authenticity of the costume. Back to Duty

K14: Laundry techniques and garment care and processes. For example, silk care versus woollen or cotton care. Costume finishing including ironing or steaming, as appropriate. Back to Duty

K15: Costume packing techniques for storage while costumes are inactive to avoid damage such as moth and mould, adhering to health and safety considerations. Back to Duty

K16: Workplace practices such as use of IT systems software or record keeping systems relating to costume. Back to Duty

K17: How photographic records are used in productions and performances. Back to Duty

K18: Costume or wardrobe departmental administrative requirements, such as alterations records, continuity notes, timesheets and work rotas. Back to Duty

K19: Costume rigging requirements including the health and safety implications when using these such as specialist quick changes, harnesses or integrated props, appropriate to a specific performance or production. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Work to the requirements of the organisation’s or production’s data protection policy specifically in respect of confidentiality in relation to artists and the projects such as NDAs (non-disclosure agreements). Back to Duty

S2: Comply with health, safety and security policies and procedures, including where appropriate selecting, using and wearing the required personal protective equipment. Back to Duty

S3: Plan for and safely relocate costumes as required ensuring costumes are protected from damage. Back to Duty

S4: Safely pack and unpack costumes and wardrobe equipment for storage and future use. For example, returning hires ensuring compliance with agreed terms and conditions. Back to Duty

S5: Organise the keeping of the costumes and equipment in a tidy and secure manner and contribute to good housekeeping. Back to Duty

S6: Safely operate equipment such as sewing machines, washing machines or steam irons. Back to Duty

S7: Create and maintain documentation relating to costumes for the purposes of a production. For example, dressing plots, costume descriptions and packing lists, using organisational recording systems, such as IT or paper-based records. Back to Duty

S8: Set costumes in dressing areas and check off costumes against the costume list. Back to Duty

S9: Prepare costume changes by pre-setting or laying out for performance. Back to Duty

S10: Dress and undress performers before, during and after an event, production or scene adhering to health and safety requirements and professional etiquette. Back to Duty

S11: Tactfully advise cast and performers on how to wear the costumes and when restrictions may need to be in place such as food and drink consumption, delicate fabrics. Back to Duty

S12: Communicate verbally with colleagues for example actively participating in meetings or rehearsals that impact on costume. Back to Duty

S13: Respond to short notice variations, such as cast or production staff cover. For example, costume fittings, alterations or covering a plot. Back to Duty

S14: Ensure the correct and consistent appearance of costumes to meet production specifications including preparing, maintaining and working to dressing notes and original designs. Back to Duty

S15: Undertake minor alterations and repairs to costumes, shoes and accessories. For example, hand or machine sewing, before, during or after performances. Back to Duty

S16: Care for costumes and accessories according to the specific design and maintenance requirements of the item. Back to Duty

S17: Assess and select the correct products, processes and techniques for cleaning and finishing a costume. Back to Duty

S18: Follow sustainable practices in line with industry standard recommendations. For example, recycling, reusing and repurposing. Back to Duty

S19: Follow reporting procedures for broken or missing items to allow for replacements or repair. Back to Duty

S20: Prepare costumes for fittings, check the equipment needed is in the fitting rooms before you start: such as measurement sheet, alterations book, pins, tape measure, scissors, camera. Back to Duty

S21: Assist with fittings in accordance with fitting room etiquette and procedures. Back to Duty

S22: Take notes and record accurate measurements as required. Back to Duty

S23: Assist with post-fitting labelling for remake workrooms or alterations. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Commitment to maintaining high standards with attention to detail in all tasks. Back to Duty

B2: Displays respect, tolerance and dignity when working with colleagues and others in line with required equality, diversity and inclusion standards. Back to Duty

B3: Works calmly under pressure. Back to Duty

B4: Displays resilience and flexibility when facing challenges. Actively works to find solutions, accepts support and acts on feedback. Back to Duty

Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

V1.1

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the costume technician - stage and screen apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Costume technician - stage and screen apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

A full-time costume technician - stage and screen apprentice typically spends 15 months on-programme. The apprentice must spend at least 12 months on-programme and complete the required amount of off-the-job training in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

The apprentice must complete their training and meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA. The EPA will assess occupational competence.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are below.

Assessment method 1 - practical assessment with questions:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • merit
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme - typically 15 months

The apprentice must:

  • complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) outlined in this apprenticeship’s standard
  • complete training towards English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • compile a portfolio of evidence

End-point assessment gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the apprenticeship.

The apprentice must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

For the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence, the apprentice must submit a portfolio of evidence.

Gateway evidence must be submitted to the EPAO along with any organisation specific policies and procedures requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment - typically 3 months

The grades available for each assessment method are below

Practical assessment with questions:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail

  • pass

  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • merit
    • distinction

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA is taken in the EPA period. The EPA period starts when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements have been met and is typically 3 months.

The EPAO should confirm the gateway requirements have been met and start the EPA as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must be content that the apprentice has attained sufficient KSBs to complete the apprenticeship. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider, but the employer must make the decision. The apprentice will then enter the gateway.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

They must:

  • confirm they are ready to take the EPA
  • have achieved English and mathematics qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules

  • submit a portfolio of evidence for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

The apprentice must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should only contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. It will typically contain 10 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence must be mapped against the KSBs. Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested.

Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation and records, for example:
  • workplace policies and procedures
  • example costume breakdowns
  • example running notes
  • example costume description lists
  • example dressing plots
  • example running lists
  • witness statements
  • annotated photographs
  • video clips (maximum total duration 10 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio of evidence should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example, witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the discussion. The independent assessor should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the discussion . They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

Order of assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Practical assessment with questions

Overview

In a practical assessment with questions, an independent assessor observes the apprentice completing a task or series of tasks set by the EPAO. The EPAO decides where it takes place. The assessment environment must closely relate to the apprentice’s natural working environment. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

  • It results in reliable, valid and authentic assessment of a practical occupation.
  • This is a practical occupation requiring the demonstration of knowledge, skills and behaviours. Practical assessment will ensure that safety critical and seasonal aspects can be tested in a manner that is repeatable and consistent. The breadth of knowledge, skills and behaviours are unlikely to occur in a specific real-life scenario and this method ensures consistency for candidates operating across a range of diverse locations.
  • It allows for the assessment to be delivered off-site where confidentiality may not be compromised.

Delivery

The practical assessment with questions must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the practical assessment with questions.

The independent assessor must only observe one apprentice at a time to ensure quality and rigour. They must be as unobtrusive as possible.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days' notice of the . practical assessment with questions

The practical assessment with questions must take 4 hours.

The independent assessor can increase the time of the practical assessment with questions by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to complete a task or respond to a question if necessary.

The practical assessment with questions cannot be split, other than for comfort breaks or to allow apprentices to move from one location to another. Where breaks occur, they will not count towards the total EPA time.

The EPAO must manage invigilation of the apprentice during the assessment, to maintain security of the EPA, in line with their malpractice policy. This includes breaks and moving between locations.

The independent assessor must explain to the apprentice the format and timescales of the practical assessment with questions before it starts. This does not count towards the assessment time.

The independent assessor must observe the following during the practical assessment:

A brief will need to be submitted by the employer at gateway. The purpose of the brief is to provide a context relevant to the apprentices work, that will meet all the knowledge, skills and behaviours for this assessment method. An example brief can be found below.

Example practical assessment brief

The apprentice will be given a costume description list and fitting or continuity photo corresponding to a rail of costumes from the production department from which they will identify the following:

  • Items which require laundering – the apprentice will demonstrate their laundry care skills and launder the items in the correct manner.
  • Items which require repair or alteration – the apprentice will carry these out demonstrating their sewing skills.
  • The apprentice will then continue with the laundered items – looking at ironing and or steaming requirements and carrying them out.
  • Using the notes, they will allocate each item to the area they need to be in for the performance, filming or event – demonstrating knowledge of environment and the correct way to pre-set a set of costumes.
  • At the end of this they will group the items together, ready for return.

The assessment can be:

  • completed by a combination of workplace activities from the apprentice’s normal work environment - and a simulation,
  • all workplace activity,
  • an activity based on a scenario.

The rationale for this is that it provides flexibility to the apprentice, EPAO and employer. Non disclosure agreements (NDA's), scheduling or show times may limit assessment opportunities and a combination of workplace activities, simulation or scenario may be required.

  • Setting a dressing room or backstage area, for example setting out the actors’ needs for a show that evening: full costumes and costume changes required including shoes, costume and accessories.
  • Sewing an element of a garment, for example hemming a garment using hand sewing and a machine.
  • Laundry and ironing of a costume.
  • Costume general maintenance, for example cleaning of shoes, securing buttons, organising dry cleaning, removing marks prior to washing, checking poppers and quick-change elements.
  • Preparation of costumes in accordance with design requirements, using a reference photo to ensure no element of the original design has changed over time.

These activities provide the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The independent assessor must ask questions. The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to test the apprentice’s breadth and depth of underpinning knowledge against the grading descriptors.

Questioning can occur both during and after the practical assessment. The time for questioning is included in the overall assessment time. The independent assessor must ask at least 5 questions. To remain as unobtrusive as possible, the independent assessor should ask questions during natural stops between tasks and after completion of work rather than disrupting the apprentice’s flow. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training.

The independent assessor can ask follow-up questions to clarify answers given by the apprentice. These questions are in addition to the above set number of questions for the practical assessment with questions.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision. The independent assessor must assess the practical assessment and responses to questions holistically when deciding the grade. 

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the KSBs observed
  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved

Assessment location

The practical assessment with questions must take place in a simulated environment selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises. The simulated environment must relate to the apprentice’s natural work environment. Equipment and resources needed for the practical assessment with questions must be provided by the EPAO, who can liaise with the employer to provide these.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. 

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of tasks and questions in the case of re-sits and retakes, to minimise predictability.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the practical assessment with questions:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the professional discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence.

Rationale

This assessment method is being used because:

  • It can be used for synoptic assessment of knowledge, skills and behaviours.
  • It helps to assess the apprentice’s in-depth understanding of their work and covers aspects of the occupation that are difficult to observe and take place in restricted and confidential settings.
  • It is a consistent method that applies across work settings in the industry
  • It is reflective of industry best practice for reporting orally on projects and justifying decisions taken.

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade.

An independent assessor must conduct and assess the professional discussion.

The purpose is to assess the apprentice’s competence against the following themes:

  • your role,
  • sustainability,
  • communication,
  • costume preparation and scheduling,
  • costume fitting and dressing,
  • process systems,
  • health and safety.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 14 days' notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 2 weeks to review the supporting documentation.

The apprentice must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

The apprentice can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence however, the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 90 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

The independent assessor must ask at least 10 questions. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in line with the EPAO’s training. Follow-up questions are allowed where clarification is required.

The independent assessor must make the grading decision.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. They must record:

  • the apprentice’s answers to questions
  • the KSBs demonstrated in answers to questions
  • the grade achieved 

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO for example, the EPAO’s or employer’s premises.

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

The EPAO must develop a purpose-built assessment specification and question bank. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. The EPAO must maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting with employers. The assessment specification and question bank must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

The assessment specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. The EPAO must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this.

The EPAO must ensure that the apprentice has a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

The EPAO must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and the employer

The EPAO must ensure that the EPA materials are subject to quality assurance procedures including standardisation and moderation.

Grading

Practical assessment with questions

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Health and safety
K7 S2 B1

Complies with health, safety and security policies including the wearing of PPE where appropriate to maintain high standards and paying attention to the details within the health and safety legislation. 

K7, S2, B1

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

Fitting and dressing
K10 K17 S8 S9 S14 S20 B3

Demonstrates the use of photographic records to prepare, maintain and work to dressing notes and original designs to ensure correct and consistent appearance of costumes to meet production specifications. 

K17, S14

Demonstrates the use of dressing protocols and the importance of collaborative working processes when setting and preparing costumes for fittings and throughout pre, production and post production.

K10, S8, S20

Prepares costume changes by pre-setting or laying costumes out for the performance in a calm manner when working under pressure.

S9, B3

 

Evaluates the use of photographic records, dressing notes and original designs to ensure the correct and consistent appearance of costumes to meet production specifications.

K17, S14

 

 

Costume maintenance
K12 K13 K14 S6 S15 S16 S17

Demonstrates the safe use of machine or hand sewing techniques to undertake minor repairs to costumes, shoes or accessories. 

K13, S6, S15

Undertakes the cleaning, finishing and maintenance of costumes and accessories, selecting products, processes or techniques according to specific design requirements. 

K12, K14, S16, S17

 

 

Analyses the effectiveness of different products, processes and techniques used to clean, finish and maintain costumes and accessories.

K12, K14 S16, S17

 

 

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all of the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Your role
K1 K2 K4 K5 K6 S1 B2

Describes the departmental structure, vision and purpose of the setting, including the significance and importance of your role and how each department interacts and works logically with each other. 

K1, K2

Explains how equality, diversity and inclusion principles are relevant to the role and how they enable respect, tolerance and dignity when working with others.

K4, B2

Explains how the data protection and social media policies impact on the role, particularly in relation to artists and the projects.

K5, S1

Explains how current workplace safeguarding and child protection rules and procedures impact on the role.

K6

 

Evaluates the impact of equality, diversity and inclusion principles on the role and the extent to which they enable respect, tolerance and dignity when working with others.

K4, B2

Sustainability
K8 S18

Describes how they follow sustainable practices in-line with industry standards and departmental processes and how they contribute to the reduction of the carbon footprint.

K8, S18

 

Evaluates the impact of following sustainable practices that are in-line with industry standards and departmental processes and the extent to which these contribute to environmental sustainability and the reduction of the carbon footprint.

K8, S18

 

Communication
K3 S12

Describes using verbal, written and digital communication techniques with colleagues including the  use of industry language.

K3, S12

 

 

Evaluates the effectiveness of verbal, written and digital communication techniques used with colleagues.

K3, S12

 

Costume preparation and scheduling
K9 K11 S7

Explains how to identify clothing and other costume elements to meet period or genre requirements.

K11

Explains the requirements and purpose of show or production documentation and costume breakdown, running notes, costume lists and dressing plots by providing examples of documents created and maintained.

K9, S7

 

Evaluates the requirements of show or production documentation and identifies improvements.

K9

Costume fitting and dressing
S10 S11 S13 S21 S22 S23 B4

Describes how to dress and undress performers whilst adhering to health and safety requirements and professional etiquette, including advice on how to wear the costumes and when restrictions may need to be in place.

S10, S11

Explains how to assist with fittings in accordance with fitting room etiquette and procedures and including taking notes and recording accurate measurements as required and post fitting labelling. 

S21, S22, S23

Explains how they would respond to short notice variations displaying resilience and flexibility when facing challenges, actively finding solutions, accepting support and responding to feedback.

S13, B4

 

 

Analyses changes in approach used to ensure professional etiquette, health and safety and a tactful approach is enhanced when dressing and undressing performers.

S10, S11 

Process systems
K16 K18 S19

Explain the costume or wardrobe departmental administrative and record keeping requirements relating to costumes including the reporting procedure for broken or missing items.

K16, K18, S19

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

Health and safety
K19

Describes costume rigging requirements including the health and safety implications when using these in a specific performance or production. 

K19

No grading criteria for this descriptor.

Costume storage
K15 S3 S4 S5

Explains how to plan, pack, relocate and store costumes using costume packing techniques to avoid damage.

K15, S3

Explains how to organise, pack and unpack costumes and wardrobe equipment safely in a tidy and secure manner contributing to good housekeeping, including returning to hire companies where appropriate. 

S4, S5

 

Evaluates the different packing techniques used for storage to avoid damage. 

K15, S3

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the overall grade of:

  • fail

  • pass

  • merit

  • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the practical assessment with questions and professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they will be awarded an overall fail.

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods. To achieve an overall merit, the apprentice must achieve a pass in the professional discussion supported by a portfolio of evidence and a distinction in the practical assessment or the apprentice must achieve a distinction in the professional discussion supported by a portfolio of evidence and a pass in the practical assessment. To achieve an overall EPA distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in both assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Practical assessment with questions Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Merit
Distinction Pass Merit
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

If the apprentice fails one assessment method or more, they can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does. The apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and the EPAO should agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

The apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade ofif pass they need to re-sit or re-take one or more assessment methods, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the apprenticeship standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • prepare for and undertake the EPA including meeting all gateway requirements

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider
  • work with the training provider, where applicable, to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the apprenticeship standard and is ready for EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA in a timely manner, including who, when, where
  • provide the EPAO with access to any employer-specific documentation as required for example, company policies
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows appropriate opportunity for the apprentice to meet the KSBs
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete the EPA
  • ensure that any required supervision during the EPA period, as stated within this EPA plan, is in place
  • ensure the apprentice has access to the resources used to fulfil their role and carry out the EPA for workplace based assessments
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner
  • conform to the requirements of the apprenticeship provider and assessment register
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP)
  • understand the apprenticeship including the occupational standard and EPA plan
  • make all necessary contractual arrangements including agreeing the price of the EPA
  • develop and produce assessment materials including specifications and marking materials, for example mark schemes, practice materials, training material
  • maintain and apply a policy for the declaration and management of conflict of interests and independence. This must ensure, as a minimum, there is no personal benefit or detriment for those delivering the EPA or from the result of an assessment. It must cover:
    • apprentices
    • employers
    • independent assessors
    • any other roles involved in delivery or grading of the EPA
  • have quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent assessment and maintain records of internal quality assurance (IQA) activity for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes
  • appoint independent, competent, and suitably qualified assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan
  • appoint administrators, invigilators and any other roles where required to facilitate the EPA
  • deliver induction, initial and on-going training for all their independent assessors and any other roles involved in the delivery or grading of the EPA as specified within this EPA plan. This should include how to record the rationale and evidence for grading decisions where required
  • conduct standardisation with all their independent assessors before allowing them to deliver an EPA, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • conduct moderation across all of their independent assessors decisions once EPAs have started according to a sampling plan, with associated risk rating of independent assessors
  • monitor the performance of all their independent assessors and provide additional training where necessary
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to all relevant stakeholders
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • arrange for the EPA to take place in a timely manner, in consultation with the employer
  • provide information, advice, and guidance documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA
  • confirm the gateway requirements have been met before they start the EPA for an apprentice
  • arrange a suitable venue for the EPA
  • maintain the security of the EPA including, but not limited to, verifying the identity of the apprentice, invigilation and security of materials
  • where the EPA plan permits assessment away from the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary
  • confirm the overall grade awarded
  • maintain and apply a policy for conducting appeals

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must:

  • be independent, with no conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider, specifically, they must not receive a personal benefit or detriment from the result of the assessment
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation
  • have the competence to assess the EPA and meet the requirements of the IQA section of this EPA plan
  • understand the apprenticeship’s occupational standard and EPA plan
  • attend induction and standardisation events before they conduct an EPA for the first time, when the EPA is updated, and at least once a year
  • use language in the delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the apprenticeship
  • work with other personnel, where used, in the preparation and delivery of assessment methods
  • conduct the EPA to assess the apprentice against the KSBs and in line with the EPA plan
  • make final grading decisions in line with this EPA plan
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO
  • comply with external quality assurance (EQA) requirements

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must:

  • conform to the requirements of the apprenticeship provider and assessment register
  • ensure procedures are in place to mitigate against any conflict of interest
  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard
  • deliver training to the apprentice as outlined in their apprenticeship agreement
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning
  • ensure the apprentice is prepared for the EPA
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA
  • ensure that all supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to the strategies, policies and procedures that an EPAO must have in place to ensure valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions.

EPAOs for this EPA must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities table.

They must also appoint independent assessors who:

  • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 3 gained in the last 3 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

This apprenticeship is not aligned to professional recognition.

KSB mapping table

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

Departmental structure, vision and purpose and how each department interacts with each other.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K2

The significance and importance of the role within the setting and the importance of working logically with other departments.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K3

Communication techniques: verbal, written, and digital. How to use industry specific terminology relevant to the role.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K4

Equality, diversity and inclusion principles and the relevance to the role.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K5

Data protection laws and confidentiality protocols for the setting and the impact on the role including social media policy.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K6

Current workplace rules and procedures regarding safeguarding and child protection and how they impact the role.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K7

Health and Safety legislation including Health and Safety at Work etc Act (HaSaWA), Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), personal protective equipment (PPE). Manual handling techniques and company health, safety and security policies.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K8

The importance of environmental sustainability and departmental processes for working on a production. For example, ‘Theatre Green Book’ for theatre, Albert Carbon Calculator for screen or activities that contribute to the monitoring and reduction of the carbon footprint.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K9

The requirements and purpose of show or production documentation such as costume breakdown, running notes, running lists, dressing plots, costume description lists.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K10

Dressing protocols pre, during and post production including the order of processes. For example, make-up, wigs, microphone. The importance of collaborative working processes and interdependency of departments in a performance or production.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K11

How to identify clothing and other costume elements to meet period or genre requirements for a specific performance or production.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K12

How to maintain the design of costumes taking into account the fit and the properties of fabrics and materials and how they are used in the context of the performance or production.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K13

Machine and hand sewing techniques and the importance of this for the authenticity of the costume.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K14

Laundry techniques and garment care and processes. For example, silk care versus woollen or cotton care. Costume finishing including ironing or steaming, as appropriate.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K15

Costume packing techniques for storage while costumes are inactive to avoid damage such as moth and mould, adhering to health and safety considerations.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K16

Workplace practices such as use of IT systems software or record keeping systems relating to costume.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K17

How photographic records are used in productions and performances.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
K18

Costume or wardrobe departmental administrative requirements, such as alterations records, continuity notes, timesheets and work rotas.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19

Costume rigging requirements including the health and safety implications when using these such as specialist quick changes, harnesses or integrated props, appropriate to a specific performance or production.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Work to the requirements of the organisation’s or production’s data protection policy specifically in respect of confidentiality in relation to artists and the projects such as NDAs (non-disclosure agreements).

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S2

Comply with health, safety and security policies and procedures, including where appropriate selecting, using and wearing the required personal protective equipment.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S3

Plan for and safely relocate costumes as required ensuring costumes are protected from damage.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S4

Safely pack and unpack costumes and wardrobe equipment for storage and future use. For example, returning hires ensuring compliance with agreed terms and conditions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S5

Organise the keeping of the costumes and equipment in a tidy and secure manner and contribute to good housekeeping.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S6

Safely operate equipment such as sewing machines, washing machines or steam irons.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S7

Create and maintain documentation relating to costumes for the purposes of a production. For example, dressing plots, costume descriptions and packing lists, using organisational recording systems, such as IT or paper-based records.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S8

Set costumes in dressing areas and check off costumes against the costume list.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S9

Prepare costume changes by pre-setting or laying out for performance.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S10

Dress and undress performers before, during and after an event, production or scene adhering to health and safety requirements and professional etiquette.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S11

Tactfully advise cast and performers on how to wear the costumes and when restrictions may need to be in place such as food and drink consumption, delicate fabrics.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12

Communicate verbally with colleagues for example actively participating in meetings or rehearsals that impact on costume.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S13

Respond to short notice variations, such as cast or production staff cover. For example, costume fittings, alterations or covering a plot.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S14

Ensure the correct and consistent appearance of costumes to meet production specifications including preparing, maintaining and working to dressing notes and original designs.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S15

Undertake minor alterations and repairs to costumes, shoes and accessories. For example, hand or machine sewing, before, during or after performances.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S16

Care for costumes and accessories according to the specific design and maintenance requirements of the item.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S17

Assess and select the correct products, processes and techniques for cleaning and finishing a costume.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S18

Follow sustainable practices in line with industry standard recommendations. For example, recycling, reusing and repurposing.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S19

Follow reporting procedures for broken or missing items to allow for replacements or repair.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S20

Prepare costumes for fittings, check the equipment needed is in the fitting rooms before you start: such as measurement sheet, alterations book, pins, tape measure, scissors, camera.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
S21

Assist with fittings in accordance with fitting room etiquette and procedures.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S22

Take notes and record accurate measurements as required.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S23

Assist with post-fitting labelling for remake workrooms or alterations.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Commitment to maintaining high standards with attention to detail in all tasks.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
B2

Displays respect, tolerance and dignity when working with colleagues and others in line with required equality, diversity and inclusion standards.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3

Works calmly under pressure.

Back to Grading
Practical assessment with questions
B4

Displays resilience and flexibility when facing challenges. Actively works to find solutions, accepts support and acts on feedback.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Practical assessment with questions

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Health and safety
K7
S2
B1

Health and Safety legislation including Health and Safety at Work etc Act (HaSaWA), Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), personal protective equipment (PPE). Manual handling techniques and company health, safety and security policies. (K7)

Comply with health, safety and security policies and procedures, including where appropriate selecting, using and wearing the required personal protective equipment. (S2)

Commitment to maintaining high standards with attention to detail in all tasks. (B1)

Fitting and dressing
K10 K17
S8 S9 S14 S20
B3

Dressing protocols pre, during and post production including the order of processes. For example, make-up, wigs, microphone. The importance of collaborative working processes and interdependency of departments in a performance or production. (K10)

How photographic records are used in productions and performances. (K17)

Set costumes in dressing areas and check off costumes against the costume list. (S8)

Prepare costume changes by pre-setting or laying out for performance. (S9)

Ensure the correct and consistent appearance of costumes to meet production specifications including preparing, maintaining and working to dressing notes and original designs. (S14)

Prepare costumes for fittings, check the equipment needed is in the fitting rooms before you start: such as measurement sheet, alterations book, pins, tape measure, scissors, camera. (S20)

Works calmly under pressure. (B3)

Costume maintenance
K12 K13 K14
S6 S15 S16 S17

How to maintain the design of costumes taking into account the fit and the properties of fabrics and materials and how they are used in the context of the performance or production. (K12)

Machine and hand sewing techniques and the importance of this for the authenticity of the costume. (K13)

Laundry techniques and garment care and processes. For example, silk care versus woollen or cotton care. Costume finishing including ironing or steaming, as appropriate. (K14)

Safely operate equipment such as sewing machines, washing machines or steam irons. (S6)

Undertake minor alterations and repairs to costumes, shoes and accessories. For example, hand or machine sewing, before, during or after performances. (S15)

Care for costumes and accessories according to the specific design and maintenance requirements of the item. (S16)

Assess and select the correct products, processes and techniques for cleaning and finishing a costume. (S17)

None

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Your role
K1 K2 K4 K5 K6
S1
B2

Departmental structure, vision and purpose and how each department interacts with each other. (K1)

The significance and importance of the role within the setting and the importance of working logically with other departments. (K2)

Equality, diversity and inclusion principles and the relevance to the role. (K4)

Data protection laws and confidentiality protocols for the setting and the impact on the role including social media policy. (K5)

Current workplace rules and procedures regarding safeguarding and child protection and how they impact the role. (K6)

Work to the requirements of the organisation’s or production’s data protection policy specifically in respect of confidentiality in relation to artists and the projects such as NDAs (non-disclosure agreements). (S1)

Displays respect, tolerance and dignity when working with colleagues and others in line with required equality, diversity and inclusion standards. (B2)

Sustainability
K8
S18

The importance of environmental sustainability and departmental processes for working on a production. For example, ‘Theatre Green Book’ for theatre, Albert Carbon Calculator for screen or activities that contribute to the monitoring and reduction of the carbon footprint. (K8)

Follow sustainable practices in line with industry standard recommendations. For example, recycling, reusing and repurposing. (S18)

None

Communication
K3
S12

Communication techniques: verbal, written, and digital. How to use industry specific terminology relevant to the role. (K3)

Communicate verbally with colleagues for example actively participating in meetings or rehearsals that impact on costume. (S12)

None

Costume preparation and scheduling
K9 K11
S7

The requirements and purpose of show or production documentation such as costume breakdown, running notes, running lists, dressing plots, costume description lists. (K9)

How to identify clothing and other costume elements to meet period or genre requirements for a specific performance or production. (K11)

Create and maintain documentation relating to costumes for the purposes of a production. For example, dressing plots, costume descriptions and packing lists, using organisational recording systems, such as IT or paper-based records. (S7)

None

Costume fitting and dressing

S10 S11 S13 S21 S22 S23
B4

None

Dress and undress performers before, during and after an event, production or scene adhering to health and safety requirements and professional etiquette. (S10)

Tactfully advise cast and performers on how to wear the costumes and when restrictions may need to be in place such as food and drink consumption, delicate fabrics. (S11)

Respond to short notice variations, such as cast or production staff cover. For example, costume fittings, alterations or covering a plot. (S13)

Assist with fittings in accordance with fitting room etiquette and procedures. (S21)

Take notes and record accurate measurements as required. (S22)

Assist with post-fitting labelling for remake workrooms or alterations. (S23)

Displays resilience and flexibility when facing challenges. Actively works to find solutions, accepts support and acts on feedback. (B4)

Process systems
K16 K18
S19

Workplace practices such as use of IT systems software or record keeping systems relating to costume. (K16)

Costume or wardrobe departmental administrative requirements, such as alterations records, continuity notes, timesheets and work rotas. (K18)

Follow reporting procedures for broken or missing items to allow for replacements or repair. (S19)

None

Health and safety
K19

Costume rigging requirements including the health and safety implications when using these such as specialist quick changes, harnesses or integrated props, appropriate to a specific performance or production. (K19)

None

None

Costume storage
K15
S3 S4 S5

Costume packing techniques for storage while costumes are inactive to avoid damage such as moth and mould, adhering to health and safety considerations. (K15)

Plan for and safely relocate costumes as required ensuring costumes are protected from damage. (S3)

Safely pack and unpack costumes and wardrobe equipment for storage and future use. For example, returning hires ensuring compliance with agreed terms and conditions. (S4)

Organise the keeping of the costumes and equipment in a tidy and secure manner and contribute to good housekeeping. (S5)

None

Employers involved in creating the standard: Almeida, Royal Court Theatre, Royal Opera House, Birmingham Rep, Nottingham Play House, Belgrade, Royal Exchange, AON, The Lyric, The Rambert, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, The Royal Central School of Speech & Drama, National Theatre, Young Vic, Royal Shakespeare Company, ITV, The Good Stitch, Creative and Cultural Skills, Screen Skills.

Version log

Version Change detail Earliest start date Latest start date Latest end date
1.1 Occupational standard, End-point assessment plan and funding band revised. 18/10/2023 Not set Not set
1.0 Approved for delivery 09/11/2020 17/10/2023 Not set

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